06 July 2017

Rhubarb Crumble - A British Classic

Rhubarb Crumble - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

Rhubarb Crumble is a classic British dessert, made with a vegetable-slash-fruit originally from Siberia. It's associated with springtime, but I only just this week managed to get my hands on some.

It's both hothouse-grown and field-grown in the US and has been cultivated in the UK since the 1600s. And yet the cashier at the natural foods grocery had to ask me what it was.

It's such a "thing" in West Yorkshire that growers of Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb were awarded Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status in February 2010 (Hey, that's when I started Delightful Repast!).

Making this for just Mr Delightful and myself, I used less sugar than I've listed here in the recipe because we like sour. But most people will want to use at least this much sugar (many rhubarb recipes call for a great deal more), which comes in at just under my daily sugar allowance.

Are you a rhubarb fan? Do you grow your own? What is your favorite way to use it?

Rhubarb Crumble - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com


Rhubarb Crumble


(Makes 5 servings)

The Rhubarb

1 pound (454 grams) rhubarb, cut into 1/2-inch (1.25 cm) pieces
1/3 cup (2.33 ounces/66 grams) sugar*
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Pinch of salt


* Mature rhubarb is said to require more sugar than young rhubarb.

The Crumble

1/2 cup (2.5 ounces/71 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
4 tablespoons (2 ounces/57 grams) unsalted butter, cold
1/2 cup (1.75 ounce/50 grams) old-fashioned rolled oats
1/4 packed cup (1.75 ounce/50 grams) dark brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Pinch of salt


1 Preheat oven to 400F/205C/Gas6. Butter, or spray with cooking spray, a 1- to 1.5-quart baking dish. I used a Pyrex 1.5-quart loaf dish

2 Scrub, trim and cut up rhubarb into 1/2-inch (1.25 cm) pieces; you should have about 3 cups. Add to 1.5-quart mixing bowl. Stir in sugar, vanilla extract, cinnamon and salt. Transfer to baking dish.

3 Wipe out mixing bowl, no need to wash it. Add flour and butter to bowl, and rub the butter into the flour, leaving some larger pieces of butter. Add oats, sugar, cinnamon and salt; mix lightly with fingertips. Pour loosely over rhubarb in baking dish; do not pack down.

4 Bake in preheated oven for about 35 minutes, or until rhubarb is bubbling and crumble is golden. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Serve with lashings of Custard Sauce, softly whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

68 comments:

Angie Schneider said...

We adore crumble! Can't believe that I have never baked one with rhubarb. This looks so yum, Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. I'm sure you will now! I'm looking forward to making peach crumble.

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Fascinating. Yum, yum, Fascinating. Yum…YUM! Rhubarb – yum. Did I mention this is fascinating? Rhubarb the name is fascinating. The fact that I almost poisoned myself as a tadpole eating it out of the ground is not fascinating (the leaves are poisonous, as you probably know). Your recipe is very fascinating. 5 cleavers.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sully! 5 cleavers - wow! Yes, I'd heard the leaves are poisonous, but I have no first-hand experience (as a tadpole or otherwise).

Daniela said...

Thank you, Dearest Jean, for another so precious contribute, my copy book of recipes is becoming so very interesting and captivating, I'm looking forward to your next dish :)!

Wishing you a most lovely remainder of your week,
I'm sending blessings across the ocean,
with utmost gratitude

XOXO Dany

Tony Grant said...

Rhubarb!! What an amazing shrub. It helped save Britain in WWII when the population was, "Digging for Victory." Rhubarb was one of the favoured plants to grow. It is not only a laxative but it is cathartic to boot. Two sides of the same coin!!!!! I remember,growing up in Southampton in the 1950s, many people had got used to growing their own garden produce to supplement their diets during the war, the habit was continued. We had a neighbour who grew so much rhubarb she was forever leaning over our garden fence offering, sorry the wrong word, thrusting, upon my mother large bunches of rhubabrb which my mother turned into tarts. Having eaten so much rhubarb as a child it might be surprising to you, Jean, but I still love the taste. Can't get past the the thought that it is good for me. Now, your rhubarb crumble. It sounds and looks delicious.

Louca por porcelana said...

Your dessert looks delicious!Love the napkin and the gorgeous silver spoon!Have a lovely weekend,Jean!

Mrs Shoes said...

Rhubarb & strawberry crumble is Mr Shoes' favourite - warm & loads of vanilla ice cream on top.
I grow 2 varieties - they are harder to kill than weeds! Those leaves are toxic to pets & to horses also.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Dany dear, thank you. I hope you get a chance to cook with some of the beautiful produce you have there in Italy!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, thanks. I just love the way you can "fill in the details" for me on some of my posts. Love this "rhubarb in 1940s and 1950s Britain" info!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Maristela, thank you! Of course, you would notice the napkin and spoon, with your eye for all things beautiful!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mrs Shoes, sounds like rhubarb might be just the thing I need to grow - something hard to kill! Would my cat know to not eat the leaves?

Red Rose Alley said...

This looks so scrumptious, Jean. I think you either like rhubarb or you don't, and I really like it. Haven't had it in such a long time, but it reminds me of the holidays. I know how much you like to cook, and thought you may like the recipe of PAELLA that Nel just posted.

Happy July days.

~Sheri

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sheri! And, yes, I'll definitely check that out!

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Oh, I LOVE rhubarb crumble. Well rhubarb anything really. I bought some and froze it a month ago so that I can make it once my surgery is over with. Can't wait to make it! Just waiting a few more days to heal up before I tackle it. We have rhubarb everywhere here on the Island. I have planted it numerous times but my hubby kept going over it with the lawnmower. I didn't find it funny at the time but now we just laugh about it. I finally gave up and I just buy it now. Apparently mine isn't hard to kill!

Pauline Wiles said...

Oh, be still my beating heart. Actually, I'm like Angie and love any kind of crumble. My one complaint with rhubarb is the amount of sugar it needs to taste good - but Mrs Shoes has the savvy knack of mixing it with another fruit, so I think that's probably the way I'd go too.
I could truly demolish this dish, right now!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh Sandi, glad you're doing well after your surgery! If I planted it, it probably wouldn't be hard to kill either! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Pauline! And we, fortunately, love the sourness of rhubarb and so we don't add the crazy amounts of sugar many people feel it needs. Of course, I only put 3 or 4 tablespoons of sugar in a pumpkin pie, too. Unless I'm making it for guests, then I'll use 2/3 cup of sugar; but that's as high as I'll go! :D

organicgardendreams said...

Hi Jean, this recipe couldn't come at a more fitting time! Being back from our England vacation since about three weeks ago, I am still absolutely crazy about all things English, especially deserts.
When I am at the health food store next time, I will see if I can get some organic rhubarb and will try out your recipe.
As always I appreciate that you are conscious about the use of sugar in your recipes!
By the way, my latest post is about a fancy English Afternoon Tea that we had in England in a hotel. Maybe you want to stop by and take a look? Unfortunately no recipes, but you might like the presentation.
Warm regards,
Christina

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Christina, thank you. And I'll definitely check out your post about afternoon tea!

ellen b said...

It looks delicious!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Ellen!

Margie said...

I've had rhubarb pie before and wish that I can sample your rhubarb crumble!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

I wish you could, too, Margie! Along with a nice cup of tea!

Lauren @ My Wonderfully Made said...

I LOVE rhubarb! My grandpa used to have bushes and bushes of it and he made his rhubarb "pie" in a 9x13! This recipe looks so yummy -- I'm with you -- I tend to like it more on the sour side. That's too funny that that store didn't know what it was AND I did not know it was a traditional British dessert! Thanks for sharing your recipe with us!

lulumusing said...

My very favorite kind of dessert and rhubarb is in season making it a perfect time to make your crumble.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lauren, thank you! I just adored my grandparents, so it always makes me happy to hear a wonderful grandparent story like yours!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Lulu! I hope you'll try it soon and let me know how it turned out for you.

Marisa Franca @ Allourway said...

We used to grow our own rhubarb and it wasn't until recently that I discovered my oldest son loves rhubarb. Your dessert sounds like something we'd all enjoy -- we aren't big on super sugary desserts. I'll have to make this for my son. Have a great weekend.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marisa, thank you. I hope you and he will like it. Isn't it funny when you make a discovery like that about someone so close to you?!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Can you believe that I've never even tasted rhubarb, Jean? I know, it's sad, but true! I would love to sample your rhubarb crumble! It looks so pretty in that pretty crystal serving dish, and on that lovely napkin.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, thanks. I got the napkin set from a friend when her mother died and left her more linens than she could possibly use. I'm starting to find out that a lot of people have never had rhubarb!

Marilyn Miller said...

Sounds delicious! I never liked rhubarb until about a year ago; so we have planted it in our garden and I am sure next year there will be rhubarb things to nibble. Thanks for visiting me at Delights of the Heart.

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

I have been trying to grow rhubarb in my garden with little success because the plant needs cold winters which we don't have here in California. When I bake and make jam with rhubarb I like to mix it with strawberries. Your crumble looks delicious and I have to give it a try,

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marilyn. I'll be interested to see how your rhubarb plants come along. Some people have difficulty with it, but others say you can't kill it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Gerlinde, thanks. There are pluses and minuses for gardeners everywhere! I wonder what is considered the most versatile planting zone in the country?

Ruth W said...

That looks delicious Jean... unfortunately I have never liked rhubarb...although both my family and my husband's grew and loved it...oh well...Thanks for linking to Tuesday Cuppa Tea!
Ruth

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Ruth! I love the Tuesday Cuppa Tea!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

I never thought of rhubarb crumble as a British dish but, now that you mention it, I've only heard of it from my British friends! And, of course, now you. I am a huge rhubarb fan – and we grew it when we lived in Maine. It's harder to find in the desert, but I keep my eyes open for it every spring.

Oddly, one of my favorite preparations for rhubarb is a savory chutney that I serve over grilled quail.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, rhubarb seems to be one of those things that people either love or hate! :D It's perfect in sauces for all sorts of meaty things. The chutney over grilled quail sounds superb!

Cathy Lawdanski said...

Looks delicious! Pinning!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Cathy! And Pins are soooo appreciated.

Dawn | Rhyming With Wine said...

Ooh yum. I bet the vanilla and cinnamon make it really tasty. I actually live in "The Rhubarb Triangle" that you mention in West Yorkshire. I really should eat more of it and this looks like a good place to start! Thanks for linking up Jean x

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Dawn! I love West Yorkshire (one of my grandfathers was from there - I wonder if he liked rhubarb!).

Miz Helen said...

Hi Jean,
Your Rhubarb Crumble looks delicious, I just love a fantastic crumble! Thanks so much for sharing with us at Full Plate Thursday, have a great weekend and come back soon!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Miz Helen! Hope you're having a wonderful weekend too.

Tony Grant said...

Sorry to be a nuisance, Jean. Your rhubarb crumble has brought other memories of life in 1950s Britain back to me. Another rhubarb dish we had often, as well as rhubarb tart, was simply stewed rhubarb with custard. Another thing we had after the war were the French Jonnie Onion men coming over from Brittany on the ferries into Southampton. They all wore blue berrys on their heads and rode bicycles festooned with strings of onions. They would knock on our front door and my mum always bought strings of onions from them. It was us British trying to help the French get back onto their feet after the war. Many of those young men would have fought the Nazis and some maybe were in the French Resistance. Oh yes, we ate their onions. They were fine onions too. Also our milk used to be delivered by horse drawn carts in the 1950s. I remember taking a bucket and shovel to scoop up the horsevdroppings in the road. Horse manure was wonderful as a manure for growing vegetables. Roses did very well on horse manure. We also used to get door to door delivery of fresh fish from the fishing boats on the River Itchen in Southampton. The memories are flooding back!! I wonder how you would have adapted your cooking skills to those times? There were many bombed out sites which were covered in the rubble of destroyed houses. They became overgroen with all sorts of exotic weeds. They were our adventure playgrounds . We sometimes came across bits of shrapnel.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, you're not a nuisance at all. You're bringing history alive for me! Thanks again.

Annette, 3 Little Buttons said...

Yummy yum! We love this crumble, and it's something I can actually make. I love how it tastes so summery, but at the same time a real comfort food dessert. Thanks for sharing with the #DreamTeam xx

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Annette, thank you so much! Yes, it's something even a busy mum can find time to make once in a while!

handmade by amalia said...

This looks delicious, Jean, and beautifully styled. You're an artist.
Amalia
xo

Sue Loncaric said...

I love these old-fashioned desserts. Thanks for sharing with us at #BloggersPitStop and hope to see you next week.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amalia. Just so happened to have a napkin with a rhubarb-pink flower!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, thanks. See you there!

Bernideen said...

I just asked at Walmart if they had rhubarb and the answer was no but of course Hy-Vee will and the farmers market too! I am also wanted some decent strawberries that didn't travel the world to get here and spoil! Lovely recipe that I must try here!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Bernideen! I hope you find some rhubarb and strawberries this week. I've always meant to grow some strawberries - they're such an attractive plant, too - but haven't managed to get around to it!

April J Harris said...

Rhubarb Crumble truly s a British classic, Jean, and a real favourite of my husband! Your version sounds lovely and looks absolutely delicious. My late Mom used to grow her own rhubarb when I was growing up in Canada, and we've always had it here, so I was really interested to learn how rare it can be in North America. I found out when I posted my Baked Oatmeal with Rhubarb earlier this year and lots of people either hadn't heard of rhubarb or were unsure how they could get hold of some! Thank you for sharing this delicious treat with us at Hearth and Soul.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, April! And I've been wanting to try your Baked Oatmeal with Rhubarb ever since you posted it. Eventually ... though I might have to look for frozen rhubarb if I don't do it soon!

Beatrice Euphemie said...

Sounds delicious! It's so coincidental that you have posted this, as my daughter has a rhubarb plant and has been wanting recipes! I do hope she shares some, because I would love to make this. I live just 10 miles from a little town that dubs itself( http://rhubarbpiecapital.com/)
The Rhubarb Pie Capitol and has a festival every year! Thanks for sharing, Jean! x Karen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Karen, thanks so much. I hope you'll get to try this with some of your daughter's homegrown rhubarb. That's one festival I wouldn't want to miss!

Val said...

I love rhubarb and your crisp sounds delicious. Rhubarb is one of my favorite Spring/Summer flavors. Thanks for sharing your recipe on the #Celebrate365 Blog Party!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Val, thank you so much! I love the tartness of rhubarb - it just seems so springy/summery to me!

Richard Sheppard said...

Sure sounds and looks like another winner Jean! This is a keeper.

Grammy Dee said...

Looks yummy, although I don't recall ever tasting rhubarb :) Hubby would like it! Thank you Jean for attending the #WednesdayAIMLinkParty. I pinned your post on Pinterest and shared it on Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Richard, thank you. I hope you'll both like it as much as you like my cabbage soup!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Grammy Dee. And your social media shares are soooo appreciated. High time you tasted some rhubarb!

Parsimonious Perfection said...

I love just about any crumble, and this looks delish!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, PP! I'm going to make a peach crumble next.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...