02 November 2017

Chili Verde - Chile Verde - Green Chili - Cerdo en Salsa Verde

Chili Verde - Chile Verde - Green Chili - Cerdo en Salsa Verde / www.delightfulrepast.com

With a title like that, can you tell I'm a little undecided on the proper name? Chili Verde? Chile Verde? They both have their proponents.

It had been decades since I'd made chili verde, then a couple months ago I helped with a big Mexican lunch for a group of volunteers. I made a big steam table pan of Mexican rice and a new friend brought chili verde, which I ended up serving, and the smell of it right there in front of me was making me drool!

It took a while for Gloria to get the recipe to me, so in the meantime I consulted my friend Julia (of the rice) who told me how her family makes it. And eventually I dug up my own recipe from decades ago. And what I've come up with here is a hodgepodge of all three.

Gloria's recipe didn't include green chiles, Julia's recipe did not include tomatillos, and my old recipe called for roasting fresh tomatillos and chiles and putting them in the blender.

Well, that was all well and good back in the day. But then Muir Glen began making organic crushed tomatillos in jars and I got addicted to the stuff. And would have used it in this recipe if they hadn't discontinued the product! Please join me in begging them to resume production!

Muir Glen, please please please bring back the organic crushed tomatillos in 23-ounce jars.

There's nothing on the market like it, so I decided to use a combination of fresh tomatillos and a tomatillo salsa. Of course, the tomatillo salsa, unlike the Muir Glen, contains lots of other stuff, too; so that changed everything.

Chili Verde - Chile Verde - Green Chili - Cerdo en Salsa Verde / www.delightfulrepast.com

Anyway ...

If you want to make this on the stove instead of in the slow cooker, I added a little note about that in the directions below. My friends' recipes were for stovetop versions, but I wanted to come up with a slow-cooker version for those days when I just don't want to have to keep an eye on it.

No, it isn't a typo; there is no added liquid in this recipe. I even drain the chiles. Plenty of liquid forms as it cooks, and the consistency ends up being perfect, with no need to add thickeners at the end.

Are you a chili verde fan? Do you make it with just chiles, just tomatillos, or both? Buen provecho! 

Chili Verde - Chile Verde - Green Chili - Cerdo en Salsa Verde / www.delightfulrepast.com


Slow-Cooker Chili Verde


(Makes 8 servings)

1/3 cup (1.67 ounces/47 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 teaspoon salt, divided
3/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
4 pounds* pork shoulder, cut into 1- to 1 1/2-inch cubes
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (or pork fat that you've trimmed off)
1 medium (about 12 ounces/340 grams) yellow onion, chopped
1 pound (16 ounces/454 grams - about 16) tomatillos, chopped**

1 16-ounce jar 505 Southwestern Hatch Valley tomatillo, garlic & lime green chile salsa (I wish it didn't have garlic)
1 7-ounce can diced mild green chiles, drained
1/4 teaspoon oregano
1/4 teaspoon cumin
Garnish: chopped cilantro


* Pork shoulder (also called pork butt) is very fatty, so 4 pounds trims down to about 3 pounds. There's no need to trim off every bit of fat, but you will want to cut away the huge hunks.

** To get really specific, in case anyone wants to know, I cut the tomatillo in half vertically, then cut each half in half horizontally and thinly sliced it vertically.

1 In small bowl, whisk together flour, 1 teaspoon salt and the pepper. Spread cubed pork in a single layer on rimmed baking sheet (a 15x10-inch will do nicely) and sprinkle with the seasoned flour. Dredge the meat until lightly coated on all sides.

2 In 12-inch skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil and brown a third of the pork. Add to slow cooker. Repeat twice with remaining pork. Brown it well, taking at least 10 minutes per batch.

3 Add remaining tablespoon of oil to skillet and cook the onion until soft, about 5 minutes. I cook the onion after the pork to deglaze the pan and not waste those delicious brown bits. Add about 2 tablespoons of water, if needed, to help along the deglazing. Add to slow cooker.

4 Add tomatillos. Sprinkle on the oregano and cumin. Add the green chile and tomatillo salsa and the chopped green chiles. Give it a bit of a stir.

Note: At this point, if I were cooking this on the stove instead of in the slow cooker, I'd add enough water (perhaps a little chicken broth as well) to cover the meat; bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, loosely covered, until tender, about 3 hours, stirring occasionally.

5 Put the lid on the slow cooker and set it for 8 hours on Low. Pull the lid off for just a moment at the 7-hour mark to taste and adjust seasoning.

6 Serve with (over or next to) Mexican rice, garnished with cilantro and maybe some sour cream and shredded cheese. And don't forget the warm flour tortillas. Or the refried beans.

68 comments:

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

This sounds like a great slow cooker meal, Jean. I never did find the Muir Glen product that is now discontinued. Thank you for figuring out a way to replace it for us. Enjoy your day!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, thank you. I think it's one your family will like. Happy November!

All That I'm Eating said...

This sounds delicious, definitely something to put on for a cold evening!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, ATIE - yes, perfect for a cold evening!

Angie Schneider said...

I have never made a chili verde, Jean. It surely looks very inviting and would love to have some spread all over my bread :-))

ellen b said...

Yes, I am a chile verde fan. I'll need to try my hand at making it. Thanks for the recipe.

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Good chaser after Halloween to clear the sugar off the tongue! Despite being a Mick, I’m not much for Irish stew. But Mexican “catch-alls” – which is kinda what this puts me in mind of – are a staple for me. And what’s in a name? Call it what you will, it all conjugates into what I usually term “Mexican dragon” – a concoction that may include spices, crunchy vegetables, sauces ranging from tomato repasts to sour cream, a touch of uncooked freshness like celery, cheeses, and a variety of semi-masticated add-ons like canned mushrooms and black olives, more cheeses, all centered around the ground carcass of some bovine animal. Eating utensils are replaced by crisp corn fried chips whose saltiness begs for beverage. Of course, yours is much more artful and refined than mine, but there IS a kinship.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Angie, you *must* try it - I really think you'll like it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ellen, *do* try it and let me know how it turns out for you!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, your concoction sounds perfectly delightful too. But maybe branch out a bit with this one and let your tastebuds be tingled by tomatillos!

Daniela said...

Dearest Jean,
this dish is truly new to me, and I'm competely enthusiastic for this recipe of yours, thank you for the opportunity of trying it !

Wishing you a great month of November,
I'm sending you my warmest hug

XOXO Dany

janice15 said...

Jean it sounds wonderful.. I use fresh jalapeƱos and tomatillos.. roasted first.. and slices of white onion that are brown in oil.. I havent made it in years either.. will have to try yours thanks for sharing.. with love Janice

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Daniela, thank you. I'm quite sure you will like the flavors very much. Try it on a nice cool day!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, dear Janice. I hope you will try it soon. Everyone really loved it, and I'm making more as we speak!

Mrs Shoes said...

This sounds so good, but I've had a hard time finding anything more Mexican than refried beans... I'm going to have to see if there's specialty store in the city (an hour+ drive) so I can try this. We are soon to process Spot & NoSpot the pigs - my mouth is watering just thinking about this dish. "Brown food is good food", the celebrity chefs are always saying.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Mrs Shoes! I'm so sorry you have difficulty finding ingredients. You can try ordering from the companies or from Amazon. Let me know what you find. You've got the biggest part covered, with Spot and NoSpot!

Richard Sheppard said...

I just love chili verde! I wish my wife did but she doesn't like anything pork. Sigh. I'm also disappointed to hear that Muir Glen stopped making organic crushed tomatillos! Eeeek! I finally found them in my local market. Sigh, again! But I still would love to make this and maybe freeze the leftovers for another day. Yummy!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Richard, better check all your local stores and try to buy up any remaining jars! I couldn't find any in my area at all. But do call their 800 number or fill in their comment form and ask that they bring back the tomatillos. It really makes a difference - the more people who request it, the more likely they will be to bring it back. And do make this even if just for yourself - it freezes beautifully. I freeze it in meal-size portions.

Margie said...

I can't believe that I've gone this long without knowing about green chili. Thanks for sharing this tasty recipe!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Margie, you're probably not alone. If you didn't know about, probably a lot of people in your circle don't. You can start making this and getting everybody hooked on it! I think it might be addictive - it's that good (if I do say so myself!).

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

Oh my, chill verde , I have been looking for a recipe like this. It sounds and looks wonderful, my husband always orders it when we are in a Mexican restaurant. Pinned!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Gerlinde, thank you! I hope you'll make it soon. We are addicted to this recipe! Do let me know how it turns out for you.

Cranberry Morning said...

How could a shoulder also be called a butt?? Was someone confused about which end of the animal they were dealing with? Anyway, I wonder why Muir Glenn would stop making that product. It's always disappointing and a bit frustrating when that happens. I've never eaten Chile Verde nor have I ever seen it. But I would definitely try it if it were on a buffet at your house. :-))

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Judy! I bet you'd like it a lot. I had no idea about the shoulder/butt issue, so I looked it up. Turns out the barrels the pork was packed in were called butts. "The barrels the pork went into were called butts. This particular shoulder cut became known around the country as a New England specialty, and hence it became the 'Boston butt'."

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Well, green chili is a new one for me because I've never head of it before. It looks good although I couldn't eat it because of the pork. Pork and I just don't get along very well. But chili made from beef, I can eats lots of. I like your presentation. You always share wonderful and unique recipes, Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Sandi. You could definitely make the dish with beef. It would be different, but still very good.

Lorrie said...

This sounds delicious! I make a green chile chicken dish in the slow cooker, almost like a soup. I've not had one made with pork, but I'll bet it would be fabulous.

Mildred said...

John and I both would really love this recipe. Wishes for a nice weekend.

Lea Ann (Cooking On The Ranch) said...

This Chili sounds incredible. And I love that used a Jar of that Hatch Salsa. It's good stuff and I'm always looking for ways to use. it. In these parts Chili with an "i" refers to a soup or stew, or a blend of spices used to flavor that soup (chili powder) and chile with an "e" refers to the vegetable or a chile powder that is of a single variety. Such as a Poblano Chile or Ancho Chile powder,( pure with no blend of spices).

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lorrie, thank you. I hope you'll give it a try and let me know how you like it.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Mildred. I hope you and John have a great weekend too.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lea Ann, thank you. I agree with your info on the chile/chili issue. I always use my own combo of nothing-added single chile powders because I'm allergic to garlic and because I just like them. I didn't like using the jarred salsa for that reason, but it will work beautifully for most people. C'mon, Muir Glen, give me back my crushed tomatillos!

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

Your updated version of your chili sounds great. Thanks for the tip about cooking it on the stovetop...I'm without one at the present time.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Karen. I'm gradually starting to use the slow cooker on a more regular basis than in years past. It really has some advantages. But I don't buy that putting unbrowned meat in it turns out just as good. But you can actually brown IN my slow cooker.

Jeanie said...

this looks seriously yum, Jean. As soon as I start to heal more around my mouth I can have spice again and then watch out!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thanks. Can't wait for you to try it! Get well soon.

Marilyn @ MountainTopSpice said...

I love chili verde, and tomatillos are my favorite. I like to make enchiladas with it, our family's favorite. Your recipe looks delicious! Thanks for sharing it along with all the useful and helpful tips!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marilyn, thank you so much. I think I might be addicted to tomatillos! Would make wonderful enchiladas, though I usually use it in wet burritos.

Quinn said...

Yum! I haven't had chili verde in YEARS but my mouth is watering right now - I may use this as a test recipe for reintroducing individual varieties of nightshades to my diet.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Quinn, that's what I like to hear! I could eat this recipe every day! I really do love tomatoes, but I'm thinking tomatillos are my current favorite nightshade.

Cocoa and Lavender said...

Trader Joes used to carry a green salsa (I think with tomatillos) that had no garlic. I will have to check… Naturally, living in theSsouthwest, so many of these ingredients are right at our fingertips, often made fresh by people in the community. Can't wait to try your recipe – and I'm sure I'll make a couple changes, too!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, thank you. Do let me know if they still have that product. If not, next time I'll just use another pound or half a pound of fresh tomatillos and more green chiles.

Dr. Elise Cohen Ho said...

This sounds as if it is a great recipe to keep on hand. I love great slow cooker recipes.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Elise. I like to make *healthy* comfort food! And I hope lots of people will go over from here and read your post about eating healthy through "The Eating Season."

handmade by amalia said...

This looks wonderful, Jean, thanks for sharing. The avocado looks to be the perfect finishing touch.
Amalia
xo

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amalia. I love avocados!

Linda @ Life and Linda said...

I want some! I love chili Verde. I also enjoy using the crockpot for easy meals. Avocados are a must in our house. Thanks for sharing your posts at DI&DI. happy Sunday Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Linda! And Happy Sunday to you too!

April J Harris said...

I have never had Chile Verde, but looking at your version, Jean, I sure would like to give it a try! I like that the recipe is made in the slow cooker too. Thank you so much for sharing, and for being a part of Hearth and Soul. Have a lovely week ahead!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you so much. It is a recipe that would make you famous in your neighborhood! :-)

Miz Helen said...

I love being able to use the Slow Cooker for this delicious recipe, the flavors are amazing! Thanks so much for sharing your awesome post with us at Full Plate Thursday. Hope you are having a good week and come back to see us real soon!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Miz Helen! Love Full Plate Thursday - see you then!

Mama Grace said...

This looks delicious. #TriumphantTales

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Mama Grace.

Tony Grant said...

I know nothing about Mexican food, Jean. There are Mexican restaurants in London, we have one in Wimbledon, but they are far and few between. All through my youth, myself and my friends developed a taste for hot and spicy Indian food and of course Indian recipes are now created in most British households. We are pretty big on Chinese food over here too, and Greek and Italian and French. South African restaurants are pretty big busineess in metropolitan areas but Mexican has never really taken off. It’s a wonder we still have time for fish and chips. Have you ever eaten a vindaloo curry? It is an Indian meal you have to gradually work up to I must warn you. It can burn your internal organs to an agonising pulp.Ha! Ha! Going to the loo the next day can be excruciatingly painful. Ha! Ha!

Tony Grant said...

As an addendum to my previous comment, you might be wondering why perfectly normal English people would want to inflict on themselves the internal fire storm a Vindaloo Curry causes. Its a challenge many English people, after a few pints of beer, Jean, just can't resist it seems!!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, I haven't had a lot of Indian food, but what I've had I've enjoyed. When I think of vindaloo, I think of Jerry in The Good Life enjoying his takeaway when Margo was out for the evening.

Marilyn Miller said...

Yummm! I would love this.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Marilyn. It's just about our favorite thing to eat right now!

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

Just what I was looking for Jean! But I am embarrassed to say I have never (that I know of) tasted tomatillos. Are they much different from tomatoes? I like garlic in everything--and cumin along with oregano are my favorite spices right now. I like a good green chilli with my pork---so you can see you presented what I'm looking for right now!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, thank you! Yes, tomatillos are very different from tomatoes. They are small and green and covered in a husk that you pull off, and they feel rather sticky but that washes off. I don't know how to describe the flavor other than addictively delicious! And maybe kind of tart and fruity/citrusy. Soooo good.

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

thanks, Jean. I'll give them a taste. I love citrusy.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, you must remember to come back and tell me all about it!

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

Will do, Jean!

Debbie Harris said...

Oh yes! Jean,I will most certainly put this recipe in my recipe file, yum!
I have a green chili recipe from my late Aunt that is awesome, but this here looks and sounds wonderful.
We have Hatch roasted green chillies right here in our area, Colorado. They are brought in and roasted literally by the road side and oh my are they ever delicious. I use both mild and hot chillies when I cook with them, that gives the dish a little punch, but not too hot.

It was so nice visiting and reading some of your posts that I have missed while away with mom.
Thank you for your lasted visit to my place, it's always a joy seeing you in my in box.

Blessings~

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Debbie, I think I'm addicted to green chiles and tomatillos! Thanks so much for visiting in the midst of all that you have going on. Don't forget to take care of yourself as well. Hugs.

Red Rose Alley said...

Oooo, I love Chili Verde, and with Mexican rice, even better. My daughter is going to make her grandma's famous enchiladas for Christmas. I think you would really like them, Jean.

~Sheri

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sheri, thank you. Bet I'd love those enchiladas!

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