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19 September 2019

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues / www.delightfulrepast.com

As the long hot summer seques into autumn, I'm still favoring easy but elegant recipes that will get me out of the hot kitchen as quickly as possible. Summer's cherries have been replaced in my affections by black mission figs.

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues / www.delightfulrepast.com


Got in a supply today and thought of making a Fig and Frangipane Galette or a Fig Upside-Down Cake, but they both seemed like too much work on a hot day, so I went with that northern French classic we love, clafoutis (pronounced cla-foo-TEE). 

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues / www.delightfulrepast.com


It's shocking to me the number of people who make a funny little face whenever figs are mentioned and claim to not like them, even though most of them have never tasted one. The flavor is like nothing else, sort of jammy, fruity, earthy. Though it looks "seedy," the interior is soft.

And they're such lookers! Beautiful inside and out. The velvety purple skin of the black mission fig is edible, so don't even think of peeling it. And the flesh comes in such beautiful shades of pink. The fig is actually an inverted flower, so it's no wonder it's so photogenic.

Are you a fan of figs?

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues / www.delightfulrepast.com

Fig Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Figues


(Makes 8 servings)

1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
3/4 pound (12 ounces/340 grams) fresh figs, halved lengthwise (quartered, if large)
1/2 cup (3.5 ounces/99 grams) sugar, divided
1/4 teaspoon cardamom or ginger, optional
3 large eggs

1 tablespoon brandy
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh orange zest
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 dip-and-sweep cup (2.5 ounces/71 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups (10 fluid ounces/296 ml) milk
Garnish: powdered sugar

1 Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. Butter a Pyrex Easy Grab 9.5-Inch Deep Dish Pie Plate, not the standard 9-inch pie plate, with the 1/2 tablespoon softened butter. In a small dish, melt the tablespoon of butter and leave to cool slightly.

2 Place the halved (or quartered, as mine were) figs cut side up in prepared dish in a single layer. Stir together 1/8 cup sugar and cardamom; sprinkle evenly over the fruit.

3 In a 1-quart glass measure, whisk together the eggs, all but 1 tablespoon of the remaining sugar (save it to sprinkle on top), melted butter, brandy, vanilla extract, orange zest and salt. Whisk in the flour and then the milk, adding it gradually at first, to make a smooth batter. If it’s not as smooth as it should be, you can hit it with an immersion blender. Don’t drag out your blender for this one; a whisk will get the job done.

4 Pour the batter over the fruit. Sprinkle on the reserved tablespoon of sugar. Bake for about 45 minutes, until puffed and golden and browning around the edges and pulling away from the edges of the pan. Then it falls; that is perfectly normal.

5 Let stand 10 to 20 minutes before serving warm. Add a dusting of powdered sugar, if you like, just before serving. 


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Jean

46 comments:

  1. I always love easy elegant recipes, no matter what season :-) The clafoutis looks so beautiful and inviting with figs, Jean.

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  2. Thank you, Angie. And you have a way of making every recipe look elegant!

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  3. Dunno why figs have fallen out off the menu of history. I think I’ve had them, but maybe not, as the only thing I associate with figs is “prune whip.” In any case, I suspect it’s a marketing failure. “Fig” is just too insignificant a word. People don’t give a fig for figs. They need to be rebranded to suit your lavish description. Call them “fig-a-lulus” or “figatrigs” or something with some zing. I know. I’ve committed another blasphemy. Now I shall go to bed with no figgy pudding…

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  4. Sully, I can't say I'm surprised that you can't say for sure that you've ever had a fig. Not sure I would attribute that to a "marketing failure" in your case. :D

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  5. The recipe sounds tasty. The closest I've gotten to a fig is Fig Newtons! Thanks so much for linking up at the #UnlimitedMonthlyLinkParty 4. Shared.

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  6. Figs have a fantastic flavour. Well done for promoting them Jean. A ,"clafoutis." Have you spent a lot of time in France and Europe generally, Jean? Your recipes are often generic French, Italian and think you have made some Greek recipes in the past. Tony

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  7. I absolutely ADORE figs (sorry to shout). We have a smallish fig tree in our garden and on Tuesday, we picked the first 2. Jean, I'd be happy to talk figs with you any time!

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  8. Thanks, Tony. I enjoy all sorts of food, at least a little something, from just about everywhere. My foreign language skills are seriously lacking--usually limited to food terms!

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  9. I love figs, and this looks delicious. xo Laura

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  10. Pauline, it makes me soooo happy to hear from another fig fan! What's not to love about figs, right?! How lovely for you to have your own tree.

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  11. It's been way too long since I've made a clafoutis! What a yummy way to celebrate fig season. P.S. Gorgeous photos, Jean!

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  12. We are huge fans of figs. Up until my 30s (which is, admittedly, a long time ago), I had only had dried figs. Then I was visiting San Francisco with a friend and we went to the Ferry Building farmers market and I saw my first fresh figs for sale. I knew I had to buy and and eat it. It was one of the best decisions I have made. I was immediately addicted.

    I have never thought of putting them into a clafoutis—brilliant! If I can find any autumn figs out there, I will try this! Thanks, Jean!

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  13. Your fig clafoutis looks wonderful, Jean, and so pretty on that plate! I made fig preserves this summer from a friend’s fig tree. I also love dates, and many turn up their noses at them, too. Happy baking and painting!

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  14. Liz, thank you so much. So many good things to make, so little time!

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  15. David, thank you. I hope you can find some fresh figs and try this soon. I love that you remember the first time you tried a fig!

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  16. Thanks, Kitty. Fig preserves would be wonderful! And you're right about dates, too. Hope I can get some painting in on Sunday!

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  17. I used to eat fig when I was a kid and remember enjoying it. I no longer come across fig a lot but had fig cookies rather recently. Didn't recognize fig flavor but they were good anyway :-) Your fig clafoutis looks delicious!

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  18. Thanks, Tamago. It's funny how foods seem to "fall off our radar" from time to time.

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  19. Your shadows and shading are just perfect in your paintings. And the color JUST right!

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  20. Jeanie, thank you so much. You are one of the artists I admire, so I'm always happy to get your opinion and any suggestions.

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  21. Hello, I have never tried clafoutis. It does look delicious! Thanks for sharing.
    Enjoy your day, wishing you a happy weekend.

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  22. Thanks, Eileen. I hope you'll try one soon!

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  23. Delicious. I for one enjoy figs. When I was young I would pick them off my cousin's tree and eat them right then and there.

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  24. Thanks, Ellen. That sounds like a good food memory!

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  25. Your recipe looks mouthwatering!My Mom loves fig and we had it (the tree) in our backyard when I was a teenager...Birds loved figs too!Sweet remembrances!Thank you for your visit!Hugs!

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  26. Thank you, Maristella. It's probably a good thing I don't have a fig tree (or a peach tree), I'd eat waaaayyy too many!

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  27. I adore figs, and feel that my garden is paradise now that my fig tree in its fourth year has a bumper crop. I am picking fruit under the September sun every day. I am going to make this clafouti for breakfast in the morning. Thank you!

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  28. Thank you, Gretchen. I think it makes a delightful breakfast. How wonderful to have your own tree!

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  29. That's a pretty fancy recipe for me, but the plate is beautiful!
    Blessings from Harvest Lane Cottage,
    Laura

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  30. Thank you, Laura. The plate, along with a smaller plate and cup and saucer, was a gift from a friend.

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  31. I do love a clafoutis or two and using figs is an excellent notion. We're currently getting some excellent figs arriving from Turkey and, for some reason, Turkish figs seem to be just about the "jammiest" I've ever come across. Although I do enjoy a fig now and then my wife would happily eat the Turkish figs with every meal and has been known to do so.

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  32. Yes, Phil, I'm with her. I have a tendency to eat far too many of them, knowing they won't be around forever. And they need to be used rather quickly, so we really do need to eat them with every meal!

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  33. Thanks so much for sharing your awesome post with us at Full Plate Thursday,450. Hope you are having a great week and come back to see us soon!
    Miz Helen

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  34. Fig is always my favorite but quite expensive here. Yours looks extremely delightful..

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  35. Miz Helen, thank you so much. Love sharing at #FullPlateThursday!

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  36. T and T, thank you. Yes, figs are often quite expensive here as well. When I can get them as a bargain or a gift, I'm so grateful.

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  37. Figs are really good. Usually one of those fruits I don't bake with -- just eat them neat. This is a terrific recipe -- definitely our kind of dish. Thanks!

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  38. I just have fresh figs the other day and they were delicious. I can't imagine someone not wanting to give them a try. You dessert sounds terrific.

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  39. I have no problems with figs We love them- especially fresh figs are so delicious . Your clafoutis looks wonderful

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  40. Thanks, Karen. I can't imagine either--what's not to love?!

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  41. Thank you, judee! Yes, they are delicious--and completely unlike anything else.

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  42. Do enjoy Clafoutis :)
    This recipe looks delicious.

    All the best Jan

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