01 April 2011

Pan-Seared Ribeye Steaks - Rocky Mountain Organic Meats

Ribeye steak is my all-time favorite steak. I don't eat meat every day and I don't like to eat ridiculous quantities of it, so I've always preferred a nicely trimmed ribeye, about 8 ounces and about an inch thick (makes two meals for me!). And since, ideally, I would be a vegetarian instead of the flexitarian that I am, I prefer to have meat that has been organically, ethically, humanely and sustainably produced. (I hope my vegetarian and vegan readers will pass this post along to their omnivore friends.)

When I "met" Rod Morrison of Rocky Mountain Organic Meats on Twitter, I looked into the company and learned that their beef and lamb are 100% grass-fed, grass-finished and certified organic. No hormones. No antibiotics. No grain. No GMO feed. No irradiation. No feedlots where deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria thrive. Passionate about sustainable and organic agriculture and livestock production, Rod is dedicated to environmentally friendly agriculture practices, healthy land stewardship and--most important to me--the ethical treatment of animals. The animals are allowed to roam free and are treated humanely.

While two of the steaks thawed (they are shipped frozen from Wyoming), I pondered pan sauces and checked to see if I had on hand all the ingredients needed for my simple shallot pan sauce. Once the meat goes in the pan, you have to pay close attention--making mise en place (having all ingredients ready) crucial to steak cooking.

A lot of people either broil or grill their steaks and have never cooked one in a frying pan, thinking it would just ruin a good piece of meat. So I'm going to write out really detailed instructions for making a great-tasting skillet steak, something I learned from my mother. This one (in the photo) is cooked medium. How do you like your steaks?

Pan-Seared Ribeye Steaks with Shallot Pan Sauce

(Serves 2)

1 medium shallot, finely minced (about 2 tablespoons)
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (Lea & Perrins)
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon minced fresh parsley
1/8 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
2 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into 2 pieces

1 or 2 teaspoon(s) extra virgin olive oil
2 boneless ribeye steaks, 1 inch thick, about 8 ounces each, room temperature
Salt
Coarsely ground black pepper

1 Get sauce ingredients ready before starting steaks. Now I know this doesn't sound like much sauce. It isn't supposed to be. It's just a tiny bit of sauce for each steak, enough to accent the flavor of the beef without overpowering it. Trust me, it's the way to go!

2 Heat heavy-bottomed 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until very hot, about 3 minutes. Add the oil, not much, just enough to coat the bottom of the pan.

3 Thoroughly dry steaks with paper towels and season both sides with salt and lots of pepper. The oil should be shimmering in the hot pan.

4 Place steaks in the pan, with space between them. Cook over medium-high heat, not moving steaks, until well browned, about 5 minutes. Using tongs, turn steaks; cook 5 minutes. Turn steaks again and reduce heat to medium and continue cooking for 4 minutes (or 2 for medium rare, 6 for medium well to well done). Turn once more and cook for another 2 minutes. Transfer steaks to plate, tent with foil, and let rest 5 minutes or so while making the sauce.

5 As soon as steaks are removed, add shallots to pan and cook over low heat until softened, about 1 minute or so. Turn heat to medium-low; stir in Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, mustard, parsley and pepper, scraping up browned bits. Add accumulated juices from platter. Add butter, whisking constantly until melted. Spoon over steaks and serve immediately.

28 comments:

Cranberry Morning said...

Thanks, Jean. I'm one of those people who would have thought that any steak would be ruined if pan fried. I copied your detailed instructions and will try this next time! Looks delicious. I don't have steak often, but if I'm going to eat one, it better be a really good cut and taste delicious!

Jean said...

Thanks, Judy! When you do try it, please let me know how it turned out for you.

Meghan@travelwinedine said...

Thanks for this post. I don't eat red meat, but I do prepare it for my husband a few times a month. I have had some success in using a frying pan but am always nervous. This post will come in handy!

Jean said...

Meghan, thank you! I hope it helps. I don't cook steak very often, but this method never fails me.

Marc Frederic said...

April Fools?

Jean said...

No, Marc, it isn't an April Fool's joke. I really do cook meat once in a while, even though I would probably waste away were it not for legumes!

Melanie said...

Oh wow, I actually have all of these things at my house (well, not the organic ribeye, just a regular one from the grocery store.) The sauce sounds yummy; will have to try it out this weekend!
Just want to make sure I have one thing straight: heat the pan first, then add the oil, don't heat the oil in the pan? If this is the case, it would explain some issues I have had with pan frying steaks (oil getting too hot). This would be nice with some salad greens too.

Jean said...

Yes, you must heat the pan first. Takes a few minutes. Then add the oil. It will heat very quickly. I don't like overheating oils, not good for the food AND not good for YOU.

I had asparagus and mashed potatoes with it (I like mashed potatoes with everything--or with nothing!), but it would be wonderful with a nice green salad. Let me know how it turns out.

LightartedSue said...

Yummm, Jean! I'd like to say I'm a vegetarian, but I'm not. Like you, my favorite is ribeye....and I would never have pan fried! This looks delicious....and I will give it a try. I'm going to pass on to other folks.

Jean said...

Thanks so much, Sue, for the vote of confidence! Let me know how it turns out for you.

Caveman Home Companion said...

I like mine medium rare! I've been pan frying my rib eyes for years, but they never look as tasty as yours! This is a fantastic looking recipe and I'm going to try it tomorrow. Thanks!

Jean said...

Thanks, Caveman! I hope it turns out well for you. What's not to like about a well-browned (on the outside) steak with a little shallot pan sauce!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

I usually just wave a cut of steak in front of a 60-watt light bulb for 10 secconds before I eat it, but now that we're being mandated to CFLs, I may switch to pan. Course, CFL stands for Curly Fry Lightbulb, so maybe that's apropos. Key for me, though, is tenderizing the steak with "a thousand cuts" and salt poured into the wounds -- well, tenderizer. I literally dance a couple of forks into the sprinkled meat until everything permeates. Clueless abt other ways, but this seems to work for my iron-clad taste buds. Am currently skiing/hiking/snowshoeing around the northwest and seeing lots of cattle on the high plateaus. Open range definitely more hygenic-looking than the feed lots.

Jean said...

I don't think the Curly Fry Lightbulb gives a steak the flavor you get with a really hot frying pan! But whatever works for you. Yes, almost any situation looks more hygenic than feedlots! (I shudder.) Happy travels.

Mrs. Tuna said...

I usually grill our steak but sometimes its just too hot in Arizona. I'll have to print this out to try when its 110 degrees here.

Jean said...

Smart idea! That would be the perfect time to try it. Hope you like it.

Dr. Kristofer Young said...

Beautiful Jean!
You are taking your own photos? They are great!
To find Rocky Mountain, you went to Twitter, and searched by what?
Kris

Jean said...

Thanks! Yes, I take all my own photos, learning as I go! Just click on the link in the second paragraph for RMOM.

Dina said...

Jean - Thank you so much for being our first guest contributor to our blog! I am so glad we connected.

Jean said...

Dina, it was my pleasure! I like to take every opportunity to get the message out about these issues.

Jenn said...

Jean, that steak look incredible! I love the flavors of the sauce too. And yes, before I actually had a grill, I would pan sear steaks... they turn out perfect if done right! Great details on how to do just that.

Jean said...

Thanks, Jenn! I've never learned to use the grill (I know, I know ...), so maybe that's why I perfected the skillet method!

Conor @ Hold the Beef said...

For someone who doesn't eat much meat, you sound like a pro! I have never cooked a steak and it seems like one of those things to test someone's cooking ability with. I think you'd get an A+ and perhaps a nice sticker too ;)

Jean said...

Conor, thank you so much--that's the nicest thing anyone has said to me all day, it can only go downhill from here!

TheArtistOnTheRoad said...

I was going to grill some steaks last night but then remembered your pan cooked recipe. So I decided to give it a try and it was really good! You are right, it doesn't make much sauce but it's plenty since you don't want to overpower the meat. Served with green beans and a baked (microwaved!) potato on the side. Perfect.

Jean said...

Thanks for coming back and letting me know how it turned out for you! Sounds like you had a Delightful Repast!

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

Jean!
I've been meaning to get back to you on this recipe. I gave it a try a couple of weeks ago and my husband loved it. I love your very simple, but elegant suggestions. Thank you for a very good blog! I posted this recipe and your site on fb.

Jean said...

Susan, thank you! I'm so glad you and your husband liked it. And thanks for plugging me on Facebook (I'm not on Facebook, so ...).

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