26 December 2019

Apple Bread and Butter Pudding

Apple Bread and Butter Pudding - Classic British Comfort Food / www.delightfulrepast.com

I love a well made Bread and Butter Pudding, don't you? I've never really cared for ones with raisins or other dried fruits, but I do love one with some lightly cooked apples. And, of course, I used all organic ingredients and far less sugar than most recipes call for, so it's practically health food!

It's the perfect traditional comfort food dessert to warm you up on a cold evening. And you can make it ahead, which always makes me happy. I made this one large batch to serve to guests on two different evenings, putting half in the refrigerator for the first guests and half in the freezer for the others.

My ingredient quantities exactly fill a 13x9x2-inch 3-quart Pyrex baking dish. So don't get all loosey-goosey with the measurements unless you don't mind using an additional dish for the extra mixture. You can freeze it whole or cut into servings. Either way, move it from freezer to refrigerator the night before and then reheat in oven or microwave just before serving.

Mr Delightful likes the pudding cold with whipped cream. I like it warm, not hot, with a small scoop of organic vanilla ice cream. What's your preference?

Apple Bread and Butter Pudding - Classic British Comfort Food / www.delightfulrepast.com
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Apple Bread and Butter Pudding


(Makes 12 servings)

16 ounces (454 grams) good sliced white bread
3 medium (about 6 ounces/grams each) Golden Delicious or other good baking apples, skin on, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
4 tablespoons (1 ounce/28 grams) unsalted butter
1/4 packed cup (1.75 ounces/50 grams) dark brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
6 large eggs (medium in UK)
1/2 cup (2.33 ounces/66 grams) sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon mace or nutmeg
2 cups (16 fluid ounces/473 ml) milk
1 cup (8 fluid ounces/237 ml) heavy cream
2 tablespoons (1 fluid ounce/30 ml) brandy
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 Butter a 13x9x2-inch baking dish. Using bread that's a few days old (I often use 12 slices from the 1 1/2-pound loaf of Arnold/Brownberry/Oroweat potato bread), leave the crusts on, stack the bread a few slices at a time and cut into cubes, 16 squares per slice.

Note: This Fallue - Norman Brioche is excellent for bread puddings. Cut 1-inch thick slices and cut them into 1-inch cubes.

2 In a very large skillet (or Dutch oven) over medium heat, cook apples, butter, brown sugar and cinnamon until butter and sugar are melted and apples are softening a bit, about 10 minutes or so. Remove from heat and let stand to cool a bit while preparing the custard.

3 In 2-quart bowl, whisk together eggs, sugar, mace, salt, milk, cream, brandy and vanilla extract.

4 Add bread cubes to apples in skillet, mixing gently (you may use your impeccably clean hands!). Pour mixture into prepared baking dish, and spread evenly. Pour custard over all. And I don't know if you really need to, but I like to press the top down gently just to settle everything in. Let stand for 30 minutes or so. During the last 10 or 15 minutes, preheat the oven to 350F/180C/Gas4.

5 Bake until puffed and golden and knife inserted in center comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Transfer dish to rack and cool about 20 to 30 minutes to serve warm with either ice cream or Custard Sauce. Or refrigerate for at least 3 hours to serve chilled with whipped cream. It's also delicious at room temperature. Will keep in refrigerator for 2 to 3 days; in the freezer, for 2 to 3 months.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

19 December 2019

One-Pan French Onion Chicken

One-Pan French Onion Chicken / www.delightfulrepast.com

One-Pan French Onion Chicken is a great dinner party dish. And for a speedy weeknight dinner, you can make the caramelized onions in advance to hurry things along. Caramelized onions can't be rushed, but the cooking time is pretty much hands-off. I like to make a double batch and freeze half for future convenience.

You can easily double the recipe, but you'll need to cook the chicken in two batches. The chicken will not brown properly if the pan is crowded. It's okay to crowd the pan a bit for the broiling.

One-Pan French Onion Chicken / www.delightfulrepast.com


If your eyes are as sensitive to onions as mine are, you'll want to don a pair of these fabulous onion goggles before slicing the onions. Getting those goggles several years ago was life-changing! They come in several trim colors; mine have the lime green trim and really look quite cute!

The perfect "starch" to go with this for a dinner party is Pomme Rosti, but for family dinner I like Mashed Potatoes. Seasonal vegetables or salad round out the meal. We paired it with a decent French rosé, but lots of wines would work.

One-Pan French Onion Chicken / www.delightfulrepast.com

One-Pan French Onion Chicken 

Though I usually post strictly original recipes, this is one is adapted from one I saw on thekitchn website. I've made changes, added flavor and added a lot of my own info to the directions that I think will be helpful to you. 

(Makes 4 servings)

1 1/2 pounds (2 medium/24 ounces/680 grams) yellow onions, quartered and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons (1 ounce/28 grams) unsalted butter
3 tablespoons (1.5 fluid ounces/44 ml) extra virgin olive oil, divided
5/8 teaspoon salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon sugar 
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts (total weight 1.25 to 2 pounds/567 to 907 grams), halved horizontally starting at the thick end 
1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 
2 tablespoons (1 fluid ounce/30 ml) dry sherry or brandy 
1 cup (8 fluid ounces/237 ml) low-sodium chicken broth 
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/8 teaspoon marjoram
1/8 teaspoon thyme leaves
1/2 packed cup (2 ounces/57 grams) shredded Gruyere (or mozzarella)
2 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley 

1 In heavy-bottomed large skillet that is broiler-safe (I use the All-Clad Stainless 12-Inch Fry Pan), cook the onions in butter and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over low heat, covered, for 15 minutes. No need to watch them, just set the timer and walk away. 

2 Stir in the sugar (helps with browning) and 1/8 teaspoon of the salt. Cook, uncovered, over moderate heat (onions should be sizzling), stirring occasionally,* for about 35 to 45 minutes or more, or until onions are well caramelized, evenly brown. Transfer onions to one side of a large plate. 

* Check the onions every 5 minutes, but do not stir until they're sticking to the pan a bit. You need to let the onions stick a little to brown, then stir and scrape the pan. Just do not let it burn, or it's all over! 

3 Pat the chicken dry and season with pepper and remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt (or to taste). 

4 In same skillet, heat remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil (and whatever oil is left in the pan from the onions) over medium-high heat until shimmering. Cook the chicken over medium-high heat until lightly browned and cooked through, about 5 to 7 minutes per side, depending on thickness. If the chicken is sticking to the pan, it's not ready to turn; keep cooking. It should register 165F/74C on an instant-read thermometer. Transfer chicken to plate with the onions. 

5 Place an oven rack about 6 inches from the broiler and turn oven to Broil. Add sherry or brandy to skillet to deglaze, scraping up any browned bits. Whisk in broth and Dijon mustard. Bring to a boil. Boil gently for 5 minutes or so until sauce is reduced by half. 

6 Return the four chicken pieces to the skillet. Top each with caramelized onions and shredded cheese. Broil until the cheese is melted and browned, about 2 minutes. Garnish with minced parsley.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean 

12 December 2019

Pâte Brisée - Pie and Tart Crust

Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for pecan pie (as pictured), tarts, and quiches / www.delightfulrepast.com

Pie and tart crust is something I've been making since I was a teenager and, with the exception of Pâte Sucrée which is not supposed to be flaky, always with the aim of visible butter in the dough for maximum flakiness. I make my basic non-sweet pie crust, or pâte brisée, by whatever method suits my mood, by hand or in the food processor.

I know some people make it in a heavy-duty stand mixer, but all I've seen are still aiming for visible butter and a flaky crust. Then I saw Thomas Keller's recipe at The Splendid Table

As I commented at that site, "This flies in the face of everything I've read and practiced in many years of pie crust making, but I'm going to try it because Thomas Keller and Sebastien Rouxel said so! Sounds far easier to incorporate all the butter than to keep from incorporating it! Wonder how it will compare to my lovely flaky pastry. We shall see!" 


Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for quiches (as pictured here) or very sweet pies and tarts / www.delightfulrepast.com


So I put on my lab coat and headed into my laboratory, dusted off the stand mixer and tried it his way. He said this pâte brisée reflects his enduring respect for classical technique and is used for savory tarts, such as quiches, and for very sweet tarts. I used it for my Pecan Pie - Without Corn Syrup. And will use it for my Pecan Tart - Without Corn Syrup and Vegetable Quiche

I liked it! Have you tried it? What do you think?


Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for quiches or very sweet pies and tarts / www.delightfulrepast.com

Pâte Brisée 


Adapted from Bouchon Bakery Pate Brisee recipe 

(Makes 20 ounces/567 grams)

2 1/8 dip-and-sweep cups (10.625 ounces/301 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour, divided 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
2 sticks (8 ounces/227 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes and chilled until very cold 
1/4 cup (2 fluid ounces/59 ml) ice water

1 Place 1 cup (5 ounces/142 grams) of the flour and the salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment; mix to combine. With the mixer running on low speed, add the butter a small handful at a time. When all the butter has been added, increase the speed to medium-low and mix for about 1 minute, until the butter is thoroughly blended. 

2 Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl. Turn the speed to medium-low, add the remaining 1 1/8 cup (5.625 ounces/159 grams) of flour, and mix just to combine. Add the water and mix until incorporated. The dough will come up around the paddle and should feel smooth, not sticky, to the touch. 

3 Remove the dough from the mixer and check to be certain that there are no visible pieces of butter remaining; if necessary, return the dough to the mixer and mix again briefly. 

4 Divide the dough into two equal pieces, pat each into a 5-inch disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour, but preferably overnight. (The dough can be refrigerated for up to 1 day or frozen for up to 1 month.)

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

05 December 2019

Pumpkin Nut Bread - Pumpkin Tea Loaf

Pumpkin Nut Bread - Pumpkin Tea Loaf / www.delightfulrepast.com

This pumpkin nut bread doesn't have to be made with pumpkin. You can use an equal amount of butternut squash or persimmon or "whatever" puree.

Back in the day (my teens and twenties), nut breads of every stripe were my "thing." Then for some reason they fell by the wayside. Maybe it was when I got into cake decorating. Even though I don't eat frosting, it was the "medium" for my art in those days. But after mastering that, I moved on and haven't decorated a cake in years.

You can make this loaf in a 9x5-inch standard loaf tin, but I make it in a 12x4x2.5-inch tea loaf tin because I like the small slices. I bought it years ago from King Arthur Flour, but they no longer carry it. Now they carry a ceramic tea loaf pan in the same size. I'll list a few links in the recipe directions for similar tins, in case you prefer metal as I do.

I took this to a get-together at a friend's house recently. It was a hit. One of the guests remarked on the wonderful texture and also noted that it was not overly sweet, so that you could actually taste what it was rather than just tasting sugar. Which, of course, is what I always aim for in desserts.

Just looked online to see if my Mikasa 'Margaux' sandwich tray is still available. The pattern was discontinued long ago, but I found a used one at Replacements, Ltd at a much higher price than I paid for it new not long after it was discontinued.


Pumpkin Nut Bread - Pumpkin Tea Loaf / www.delightfulrepast.com
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Pumpkin Nut Bread - Pumpkin Tea Loaf


(Makes one 12x4x2.5-inch tea loaf or one standard 9x5-inch loaf)

1 1/2 dip-and-sweep cups (7.5 ounces/213 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/3 cup (2.67 fluid ounces/79 ml) milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
6 tablespoons (3 ounces/85 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
3/4 cup (5.25 ounces/149 grams) sugar
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/2 15-ounce can (7.5 ounces/213 grams, about 7/8 cup) pumpkin puree

1/2 cup (2 ounces/57 grams) chopped pecans

1 Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. Grease (I use softened butter) and lightly flour one 12x4x2.5-inch tea loaf pan.

Note: Here are some pans I found that are similar to mine: Wilton tea loaf pan and  Westmark tea loaf pan.

2 In small bowl, whisk together flour, soda, cinnamon, salt, ginger, baking powder and cloves.

3 In cup, combine milk and vanilla extract.

4 In mixing bowl, with electric hand mixer, beat butter until creamy, about 30 seconds. Add sugar and beat on high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in eggs, one at a time, about 30 seconds after each. Stir in the pumpkin puree just until blended.

5 Add the flour mixture in 3 parts, alternating with the liquid in 2 parts, stirring until smooth. Fold in nuts.

6 Pour into prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake for about 55 to 60 minutes. Cool in pan on wire rack for 5 to 10 minutes; remove from pan and continue cooling on wire rack.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean
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