12 December 2019

Pâte Brisée - Pie and Tart Crust

Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for pecan pie (as pictured), tarts, and quiches / www.delightfulrepast.com

Pie and tart crust is something I've been making since I was a teenager and, with the exception of Pâte Sucrée which is not supposed to be flaky, always with the aim of visible butter in the dough for maximum flakiness. I make my basic non-sweet pie crust, or pâte brisée, by whatever method suits my mood, by hand or in the food processor.

I know some people make it in a heavy-duty stand mixer, but all I've seen are still aiming for visible butter and a flaky crust. Then I saw Thomas Keller's recipe at The Splendid Table

As I commented at that site, "This flies in the face of everything I've read and practiced in many years of pie crust making, but I'm going to try it because Thomas Keller and Sebastien Rouxel said so! Sounds far easier to incorporate all the butter than to keep from incorporating it! Wonder how it will compare to my lovely flaky pastry. We shall see!" 


Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for quiches (as pictured here) or very sweet pies and tarts / www.delightfulrepast.com


So I put on my lab coat and headed into my laboratory, dusted off the stand mixer and tried it his way. He said this pâte brisée reflects his enduring respect for classical technique and is used for savory tarts, such as quiches, and for very sweet tarts. I used it for my Pecan Pie - Without Corn Syrup. And will use it for my Pecan Tart - Without Corn Syrup and Vegetable Quiche

I liked it! Have you tried it? What do you think?


Pate Brisee - Classic French Pastry - perfect for quiches or very sweet pies and tarts / www.delightfulrepast.com

Pâte Brisée 


Adapted from Bouchon Bakery Pate Brisee recipe 

(Makes 20 ounces/567 grams)

2 1/8 dip-and-sweep cups (10.625 ounces/301 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour, divided 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
2 sticks (8 ounces/227 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes and chilled until very cold 
1/4 cup (2 fluid ounces/59 ml) ice water

1 Place 1 cup (5 ounces/142 grams) of the flour and the salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment; mix to combine. With the mixer running on low speed, add the butter a small handful at a time. When all the butter has been added, increase the speed to medium-low and mix for about 1 minute, until the butter is thoroughly blended. 

2 Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl. Turn the speed to medium-low, add the remaining 1 1/8 cup (5.625 ounces/159 grams) of flour, and mix just to combine. Add the water and mix until incorporated. The dough will come up around the paddle and should feel smooth, not sticky, to the touch. 

3 Remove the dough from the mixer and check to be certain that there are no visible pieces of butter remaining; if necessary, return the dough to the mixer and mix again briefly. 

4 Divide the dough into two equal pieces, pat each into a 5-inch disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour, but preferably overnight. (The dough can be refrigerated for up to 1 day or frozen for up to 1 month.)

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Jean

48 comments:

Angie's Recipes said...

That pecan tart looks splendid and the crust turned out so perfect!

TONY said...

Well done Jean for trying a new way of making pastry. Its good to get out of your comfort zone.How else can humanity progress?
I like pate but I must admit I tend not to read the ingredients. They often create visceral feelings. But then I will happily eat black pudding, haggis, chorizo and in fact any sausage or pate made from the innards of almost any animal.(note the , almost) Just don't tell me what the body parts are. Anyway, this looks delicious.

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Hope there’s some left after I finish feasting my eyes, ‘cause, man, that looks good enough to eat! Meanwhile, Thomas and Sebastien can eat their hearts out. Your credentials are permission to create and innovate, Jean, because you do not “bake” by lining out a recipe. You grasp the purpose and effect of all ingredients. 5 cleavers!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. I make mine less sweet than most, but plenty sweet for us.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, thanks, I love experimenting. Though I am a pâte (pastry) fan, I am not a fan of pâté (pastes or loaves of stuff that usually includes liver).

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Sully--I live for those 5 cleaver awards! And I think Thomas and Sebastien and I could have a good time in the kitchen observing each other's process.

TONY said...

Ah pate and not pate!! (I have no circumflex accents or any other sort of accent as far as I know on my keyboard. I probably have but I have never learned how to use them.) I really did not know that was French for pastry. Ha! Ha!

Anyway, I have other things on my mind this evening. Marilyn, Emily and I have just been round to our voting booth and made our X against the name of anybody that will keep Boris Johnson and the Conservatives out of power. Strategic voting. I would normally vote Labour, I am a socialist at heart but Liberal Democrats are the party that will keep the Conservatives out of Wimbledon. Sorry, this is a very stressful moment in Britain's history. How have we got to this point??? Bloody hell!!!!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, Tony, stress is high all over the world, I think. But politics is outside my bailiwick, so I better stick to food! True confession time: I don't know how to do accent marks on my keyboard either; so I cut and paste!

ellen b. said...

Yes! Stick to food because you do food well!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ellen, thanks so much! :-)

tea lady said...

can I use this receipe for a tart pan with a remove able bottom, I have one and would like to make the receipe.

Lea Ann (Cooking On The Ranch) said...

Culinary School taught me the traditional of using the sheeting method by hand. With visible butter. But if Thomas Keller insists .... I might just give this a try. :)

Liz That Skinny Chick Can Bake said...

Interesting technique! I'm still searching for that perfect pie crust and with your endorsement and also Thomas Keller's, this is next on my list to try!! Thanks, Jean!!

Jeanie said...

Looks great! Woe is me -- my oven broke yesterday! And baking isn't even started! Guess who I'm calling in a few minutes!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tea lady, yes you can. I love my 9-inch tart tin with removable bottom. Also have an 11-inch one, but I haven't used it in years, since I prefer the shorter slices.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lea Ann, I like to use the sheeting method, and just couldn't believe this would turn out at all! I was quite shocked.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Liz, I've posted a few pie crust tutorials (pie crust has always sort of been my "thing"), but I just had to try this method out of curiosity. I hope you will try it and let me know if it is indeed your "perfect pie crust." I mean, Thomas Keller, right?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, I hope you can get your oven fixed today! I'm waiting for a replacement freezer door for my new refrigerator. There was a chip on the edge and, though I would have been happy to have someone come out and repair it, they simply ordered a new door. Have Rick try this crust out and let me know his thoughts!

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

I usually make pate every Christmas. {I don't know how to use the accents either} My pate is an Acadian meat pie which has been made for generations by my friend's grandmother and relatives. It is supposed to be made with a pie crust, which I made in the beginning, using the drippings from the cooked meat. But now I always make it with a bannock crust because I like the thicker crust. Your crust looks perfect and lovely for sweet or savoury fillings. Yum! Have a wonderful weekend, Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sandi, thank you. I wonder if your Acadian meat pie is similar to my Quebecoise Tourtiere, https://www.delightfulrepast.com/2016/12/tourtiere-french-canadian-meat-pie.html, something that was a tradition in my husband's family. Hope you're staying cozy!

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

Looks good, bet it tastes yummy!! Thanks so much for linking up at the #UnlimitedMonthlyLinkParty 7. Shared.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Dee. And did I mention, it's easy and foolproof!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

Very interesting method. It's not the way I first learned to make pâte brisée but it certainly sounds worth trying. I admit that I hardly ever make pastry at all these days but the next time that I do, I'm going to use this method. For what it's worth the two things that particularly stick in my mind from first being shown how to make pâte brisée by a slightly scary French pastry chef were that everything should be done 'à toute vitesse' and that it was beneficial to add a little oil with the butter (about a tablespoon to every 4 ounces of butter). I'm worried that if I try a different method that he may turn up on my doorstep brandishing a vicious-looking rouleau à pâtisserie.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Phil, I have an enormous and very heavy rolling pin you can meet him with! :D Yes, à toute vitesse and garde le froid (or something like that!). This method sounds crazy, but it turns out a good pastry. Do try it and let me know how it worked for you.

Margie said...

Your pecan pie looks great, Jean! In a funny coincidence, I enjoyed pecan pie, from relatives, earlier this week.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Margie. Nice of your relatives to supply pecan pie! Love it.

April J Harris said...

I've had great results recently making pastry in the stand mixer, Jean, although this method varies a little from what I have been doing so I look forward to giving it a try. Your results certainly look delicious. Thank you so much for being a part of the Hearth and Soul Link Party.

Tamago said...

Oooh your pate brisee looks very flaky. Crust is the favorite part of pies and tarts for me :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, April. Yes, it IS different, incorporating all the butter! Sounds crazy, doesn't it?!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Tamago. The crust is MY favorite part of pies and tarts, too! Glad to find another crust fan.

Cocoa and Lavender said...

This is really interesting, Jean. I would’ve never (like you) thought that incorporating the butter as such would work. I’m willing to give it a try. I’ve been working on several different versions using the food processor, and they have come out very well. But my favorite way to make pastry is using my fingers - that’s the way my mother did it, and that’s the way I generally do it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, I know, crazy! I love making it by hand, too. But I have some issues with one of my hands just now and so am glad I mastered the food processor technique. I think you're going to have fun trying this one out.

handmade by amalia said...

Everything you make looks so pretty and precise.
And delicious!
Amalia
xo

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Amalia, thank you so much! I try to give very precise directions so that cooks/bakers at any level can duplicate it.

Natalie said...

Thanks, Jean, for sharing a different method. Everything looks good and I bet they're delicious. #senisal

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Natalie. I was shocked by this method! :D

Kitchen Riffs said...

Neat recipe. Definitely will have to try this. I often use the food processor when I make Pâte Brisée, but Mrs KR prefers the stand mixer, so I'll be showing this to her. Thanks. And Happy Holidays!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. I'd be interested to hear what Mrs Riffs thinks about it. It's definitely different from the usual stand mixer method.

Lowcarb team member said...

Looks good Jean :)
Many thanks for sharing.

All the best Jan

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Jan! I appreciate your stopping by!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

No, I have not tried making pie crust in the mixer, Jean, but now I’d like to!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, I knoooooww! I'd heard of making it in the stand mixer (but still trying to keep that visible butter) and had no interest, but when I read this I just had to try it!

Treat and Trick said...

This looks perfect, I did mine by grating the butter then mix manually, it works fine for me..

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Nora. That's how I most often make pastry too. Love it! This was an intriguing experiment, though, and turned out beautifully, much to my surprise!

Shelbee on the Edge said...

You can’t beat a good flaky crust! The pecan tart looks amazing (one of my favorite desserts ever) and the quiche is right up my alley, too. Thanks for sharing and linking up with me.

Shelbee
www.shelbeeontheedge.com

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Shelbee. I always think the crust is the best part of anything. So I'm thinking of throwing a crust on my stew this evening!

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

Congrats! Your post is FEATURED at the #UnlimitedMonthlyLinkParty 8.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Dee! I appreciate that!

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