31 May 2018

Fallue - The Traditional Norman Brioche

Fallue - The Traditional Norman Brioche - Regional French Baking / www.delightfulrepast.com

Fallue is a traditional French brioche loaf from Normandy. And I can’t believe it’s taken me all these years to finally hear of it! Blogger Phil’s Fallue post at As Strong As Soup had me sputtering about “How have I never heard of this before now?!”

Just as I was sputtering when PBS presented Island at War on Masterpiece Theatre and I learned for the very first time that one of the Channel Islands had been occupied during WW2! (I like to know stuff!) Anyway… 

Breadaholic that I am, I wanted to make this immediately. Phil uses his bread machine to mix the dough, but I decided to use the stand mixer. I nearly always make bread by hand, but I thought I’d break out the heavy-duty stand mixer...

...and make this historical loaf in a modern way SINCE I ONLY JUST HEARD OF IT! (I know, I’m shouting, but you should’ve heard me during Island at War!) 

The recipe actually calls for crème fraiche, but I use only organic dairy products (and eggs and flour and everything else) and couldn’t find any organic crème fraiche, so I came up with my own little “faux” version: 1/2 cup organic heavy whipping cream with 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar stirred in, left to thicken a bit for 5 or 10 minutes or so. 

Crème fraiche is higher in fat than sour cream and is not nearly as tangy, so I didn’t think sour cream would make a good substitute. My faux version seemed to have just the right amount of tang. I think I’ll be finding lots more ways to use it.

You know what popped into my head when I took my first bite of Fallue? I immediately thought, This is the perfect bread for Coronation Chicken Sandwiches

So tell me, is Fallue a new one on you as well? I'm sure I would remember if Julia or Jacques (Child and Pepin) had mentioned it. I don't mind telling you, I'm a bit miffed with Jacques right now. Thank goodness Phil clued me in! 


Fallue - The Traditional Norman Brioche - French Regional Baking / www.delightfulrepast.com

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La Fallue – Brioche Normande 


(Makes one large loaf)

The Dough 

3 1/2 cups (17.5 ounces/496 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour (plus 1/2 cup – 2.5 ounces/71 grams to “work from”) 
1/4 cup (1.75 ounces/50 grams) sugar 
2 teaspoons (7 to 8 grams) instant yeast 
1 1/2 teaspoons (8 grams) salt 
1 stick (4 ounces/113 grams) unsalted butter, thoroughly softened 
1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces/118 ml) heavy whipping cream with 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar stirred in, room temperature 
5 large (medium in UK) eggs, room temperature, beat 1 of them and reserve 2 tablespoons of it for the egg wash 

The Egg Wash 

Reserved 2 tablespoons beaten egg 
1 teaspoon water 

1 In the mixer bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, instant yeast and salt. With fingers or a pastry cutter, cut softened butter into flour mixture until it looks like fine crumbs. Attach the dough hook and mixer bowl to the stand mixer. Add the thickened soured cream and eggs (don't forget to beat one and reserve 2 tablespoons). Mix on speed 3 for 10 to 15 minutes, adding flour during the last 5 minutes, if needed, from the 1/2 cup a tablespoon at a time until the dough is not quite so sticky. I used half of the 1/2 cup.

Note: The dough will not come together into a ball like other bread doughs. Resist the urge to keep adding more flour; too much flour will turn your soft and fluffy brioche into something entirely different. 

2 Transfer dough to lightly oiled 2-quart glass measure and cover with silicone lid or plastic wrap; let rise until nearly doubled, about 2 1/2 hours. You could leave the dough in the mixer bowl, but it’s easier to monitor the dough’s rise in a straight-sided clear glass container. Besides, since the dough will be going into the refrigerator overnight, you might want to free up your mixing bowl for something else. 

3 When the dough has not doubled but has risen by 75% (from the 4-cup level to the 7-cup line—see what I’m sayin’ about using a 2-quart glass measure?), put it in the refrigerator overnight (18 hours, actually, in this case). This will slow the fermentation, improving flavor and texture, and chill the butter, making shaping the sticky dough much easier. 

4 Line a large baking tray (I use a heavy-duty 18x13x1-inch half-sheet pan) with parchment paper. Turn the chilled dough out onto lightly floured surface (working from the remains of the 1/2 cup) and press it into a smooth 9-inch (23 cm) square; it will soften a bit as you handle it. Starting at the edge farthest away from you, roll the dough rather tightly into a log, sealing the seam (which will go on the bottom) and turning the ends under, shaping into a long oval loaf, about 12 inches (30 cm) by 3 to 3.5 inches (8 to 9 cm).


Fallue - The Traditional Norman Brioche - Regional French Baking (this photo - the loaf's final rise) / www.delightfulrepast.com


5 Place diagonally on the prepared baking tray. Cover lightly. Let rise until doubled and very puffy, about 2 to 2 1/2 hours. 


Fallue - The Traditional Norman Brioche - French Regional Baking (this photo - loaf risen and glazed) / www.delightfulrepast.com


6 Preheat the oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. 375F/190C/Gas5. In small bowl, beat together egg and water with a fork. Brush the dough with the egg wash. Use kitchen scissors to snip the dough all around the top edge of the loaf to make the traditional spikey effect.* Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until golden brown and sounding hollow when tapped on the bottom, or when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center bottom of the loaf registers 195F/90C.

* My spikey effect wasn't very spikey, but I don't mind! 

7 Cool completely on wire rack, 1 to 2 hours, before slicing. Serve with butter and preserves or with its traditional Norman accompaniment, Teurgoule


La Fallue - Brioche Normande / www.delightfulrepast.com

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to  earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites.

Jean

56 comments:

Ruth W said...

Hi Jean. I do love brioche...whether plain or sandwich or...well, any way. And so fun whether small or in a loaf. Haven’t seen a recipe for awhile, so thanks for that! Have a lovely week and thanks for linking to Tuesday Cuppa Tea
Ruth

Louca por porcelana said...

Hi Jean!That Brioche looks so good!Yummy!Hugs!

Decor To Adore said...

I can't say that I have heard of this particular brioche. But I would totally eat it! Love the spiky detail on top. :)

Pauline Wiles said...

Yes, Fallue is totally new to me too! But I do love your "Breadaholic" description and am definitely a member of that club...

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Ruth. And this one is so easy. People think of brioche as being complicated, but this method is simple.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Maristella! Hugs to you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Laura, thank you. Glad I'm not the only one who was left in the dark about this beautiful bread!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Pauline, you have to try this. The mixer does all the work. It's not tricky in any way. And it is soooo good, all by itself, with a cup of tea. And I can't wait to make Coronation Chicken sandwiches with it!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

You shout? I don’t believe it. You are the consummate whisperer. But I’ll give a shout out for your French brioche loaf even though I’m the universe’s polar opposite of a breadaholic. Looks good. Sounds good. Reads good. Not hard to believe it IS good. Needs lots of butter, I’m thinkin’, maybe toasted with a little garlic.

Angie Schneider said...

I am too a breadholic :-) Your brioche loaf looks bakery perfect, Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, of course, lots of butter. And, well, you are right about the shouting--I only shout with capital letters, not my voice.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Angie. Yes, you and I do love breads, don't we!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

I'm more than happy to be of service by passing on some of my more obscure recipe finds. I really love the idea of using fallue with coronation chicken. The birthplace of this bread is close to the ports where spices were landed in ye olden days so maybe it's not at all inappropriate. I think your solution for a crème fraiche alternative is just right. I might be a little bit surprised that you hadn't heard about the occupation of the Channel Islands but I'm not surprised that fallue is new to you. I think a lot of the regional dishes and breads such as fallue and gâteau battu from northern France are unfairly neglected - even by the non-northern French.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Phil, even if you weren't such a good cook and baker, and even if you didn't make me aware of these more obscure recipes, your blog would be a favorite of mine just because you're so amusing! :-)

Margie said...

This post is very timely as last weekend, I was gifted brioche buns from my aunt. I think she bought it while she was in Ottawa.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Wonderful, Margie! Brioche goes so beautifully with a cup of tea.

Anonymous said...

Can this be made in a bread machine?

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

I've not heard of Fallue either, Jean, nor the fact the Channel Islands were occupied! Really must google that one. Your recipe looks like a winner! I must give it a try soon. ♥

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Anonymous, yes. If you follow the link to Phil's recipe, it tells how he mixes it in a bread machine (though he bakes it in the oven).

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Martha, thank you. I think you're going to enjoy this brioche! Yes, go to imdb.com and look up Island at War. I'm not sure what year PBS showed it, but it was the first I'd heard of it (they give the island in the series a fictitious name, though). It just wasn't in our history textbooks here!

ellen b. said...

That is a beautiful work of art, Jean!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

Fallue is nue to me, too - can’t wait to try it. Wonderful instructions, Jean! Now I just need to figure out the timing for my schedule! (And get a 2 quart glass measure!)

kateonthinice said...

Let me eat brioche! #BlogCrush

April J Harris said...

Your Fallue looks gorgeous, Jean and so delicious too. I had never heard of this bread either, but I'm so glad that you did, and that you shared it. Your step by step instructions are fantastic too. Thank you so much for sharing, and for being a part of the Hearth and Soul Link Party. Have a lovely weekend!

Bernideen said...

That looks delicious and thanks for sharing another award winning baked goodie!

Angela said...

That looks delicious!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Ellen. And it's really easy!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, thank you. And when you make it, do let me know if I need to clarify anything in my instructions. "Nue" to you! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kate, it is rather somewhere in between cake and bread!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thanks so much. And it seems no one has heard of it before, so I'm feeling better about it now!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Bernideen, thank you. Anything that goes well with tea, I'll definitely be telling *you* about!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angela!

Sylvia Lance said...

Fallue is new to me too! But looks oh so yummy! Thanks for linking up with us!
#BloggingGrandmothersLinkParty

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sylvia!

Miz Helen said...

Oh my goodness Jean, this bread looks amazing. I can't wait to have a slice of this delicious bread! Thanks so much for sharing with us at Full Plate Thursday and have a great week!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Miz Helen, thank you. I think it would be perfect for your Old Fashioned Chicken Spread!

Fran @ Gday Souffle said...

I also haven't heard of this type of bread before, even though I lived in Paris for 9 months! I like the decoration made with the scissors- must taste heavenly especially with the strawberry jam!

janice15 said...

Your bread looks amazing.. thanks for sharing it Jean with love Janice

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Fran, thank you. I'm thinking "regional" foods in France are perhaps more regional than in other countries--perhaps this isn't well known outside of Normandy. I'll be posting its "companion" food next Thursday!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Janice, thank you. Funny, I was just thinking about you yesterday, that I hadn't heard from you in a while. Was hoping all was well with you and yours.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Hi Jean, I'm a little behind because I was babysitting for three nights/days. I have never heard of Fallue, either, but thank you for bringing it my attention. Your bread looks amazing, and I know that we both share a love of bread baking. Yes, please, I'd love this with one of your coronation sandwiches!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Kitty. And this is an easy, unfussy bread Cissy could make. And during the rises, she could make several other things--since she's a "professional" and all! :-)

Tony Grant said...

"Just as I was sputtering when PBS presented Island at War on Masterpiece Theatre and I learned for the very first time that one of the Channel Islands had been occupied during WW2! (I like to know stuff!) Anyway…

Well, anyway, Jean, it wasn't ONE of the Channel Islands that was occupied, they all were. They became part of the incredible defenses the Germans built to create "The Atlantic Wall." Google it if you want to find out more. They built underground hospitals on the islands too. The Channel Islanders were used as slave labourers alongside many Russian prisoners of war from the Russian Front to build these immense fortifications and gun emplacements.They are all there today. You can visit them. Jean you and Mr Delightful have got to go to France. You need to spend some time there. Your culinary knowledge and knowledge of European History would expand exponentially. Ha! Ha! ( I'm not saying its not extensive already) All the best, Tony

Pom Pom said...

Oh how beautiful, Jean! And with jam! You are a bread artist.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks for the info, Tony. I'm afraid I had no European history classes in school beyond high school World History, which was sadly lacking. And a trip to France would be wonderful for so many reasons!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Pom Pom, thank you! Come back on Thursday to see it paired with its dessert companion.

Debbie-Dabble Blog and A Debbie-Dabble Christmas said...

Looks really good!! Thanks so much for stopping by and for your kind words!!
Hugs,
Deb

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Deb, thank you. And be sure to come back on Thursday for the Teurgoule (a rice pudding) that goes with it. Rice pudding was very popular in Victorian times, so perfect to serve in your Victorian dining room!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Yup, Fallue is new to me, too. I'm going to have to make up for lost time. :-) This looks terrific -- thanks.

Jeanie said...

This is new to me and it looks so marvelous, so delish! I'll have to share this with the resident breadman!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

John, thank you. It's a very versatile loaf you'll enjoy with lots of different things.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, yes, Jeanie, you definitely need to have your wonderful "resident breadman" make this for you! :-)

JakiJellz said...

I love brioche - this looks lovely. Thanks for sharing with #TriumphantTales, we'd love to see you back again on Tuesday!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jaki! It's something I'll be making again and again.

Cranberry Morning said...

That looks fantastic, Jean! And I happen to live that movie Island at War. Have you read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? If you liked Island at War, you might like that book. I sure did.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Judy. And it's sooo easy, too. Yes, I've read that and liked it a lot. But thank you for mentioning it. Because you know how upset I'd be if I found out later! :D

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