06 August 2015

Homemade Mayonnaise - Immersion Blender Method - No Raw Egg

Homemade Mayonnaise - Immersion Blender Method / www.delightfulrepast.com

I do love the flavor of a certain brand of mayonnaise I grew up with, but it is not organic; so I prefer homemade. And I make mine with gently cooked egg so no one will have issues with it because of concerns about salmonella. 

Be sure to use the freshest eggs and oils for mayonnaise. Eggs lose some of their emulsifying ability as they age, and oils can turn rancid and take on "off" flavors. Taste the oils you plan to use; if they don't taste good, your mayonnaise won't taste good. 

Olive oil alone is too strongly flavored for general-purpose mayonnaise, so I use one part organic extra virgin olive oil and three parts organic canola oil. I always buy non-GMO organic expeller pressed (pressed without chemicals and high-speed presses that generate heat) oil.

If you don't have an immersion blender but you do have a food processor, try my Food Processor Mayonnaise. If you want to do it by hand with a whisk, you're on your own; I haven't done that in years! Not that it's difficult, but my beating arm is having issues these days.


Homemade Mayonnaise - Immersion Blender Method / www.delightfulrepast.com


Homemade Mayonnaise - Immersion Blender Method

(Makes 1 1/4 cups) 

1 very fresh large egg
1 very fresh large egg yolk
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon white or red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon tapioca flour or
unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
3/4 cups very fresh organic canola oil
1/4 cup very fresh extra virgin olive oil 

1 In 1-quart bowl, whisk together the egg, yolk, water, lemon juice, vinegar, sugar, flour, salt and dry mustard. Whisk vigorously for 1 minute, until mixture is smooth and frothy.



Making Homemade Mayonnaise / www.delightfulrepast.com


2 Transfer the mixture to a small nonstick skillet and heat over very low heat, stirring with a spatula, until the mixture starts to thicken. It should register 160F/71C on an instant-read thermometer; do not allow mixture to reach 170F/76C. Remove from heat, set pan in another pan of ice and water, and stir until the mixture has cooled to room temperature. Pour into 16-ounce mixing beaker. Measure the oils into the beaker. 

3 Stand the immersion blender in the beaker. With the blender blade in one spot touching the bottom, blend on low speed until the mixture begins to thicken, about 5 to 10 seconds. With the blender on low, slowly pull the blade up to the top of the beaker. Continue, moving the blender slowly up and down until thick, about 25 to 30 seconds longer. Taste and adjust seasoning. 

4 Scrape mayonnaise into a glass jar or container, cover and refrigerate. Can be refrigerated up to 4 days (some people say longer). I rarely use that much mayonnaise in such a short time, so I divide it between two jars and give one to a friend. 

41 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Technically I have an immersion blender, as I threw my last blender in the lake behind my house. But since it sleeps with the fishes, I shall try the whisk (even though my “beating arm” is also having issues from dope-slapping myself upside the head). I was particularly impressed with your analysis of various oils, and again I have drawn significant insights from your methods and the error of my ways, as I have been using motor oil (tastes awful, but I get 36 miles to the jar). Dare I mention the term “Salad Dressing”? As near as I can figure out, that’s Mayo with sugar. Sounds right for me. [Dope-slaps self.]

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, "tastes awful, but I get 36 miles to the jar" is the best oil joke I've ever heard!

Sister in the Mid-west said...

This sounds delicious! I am so glad to have found a recipe for homemade mayonnaise with cooked egg. I will book mark this page. :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sister in the Midwest! Hope you like it as much as we do. Let me know how it turns out for you.

Angie Schneider said...

I don't eat mayonnaise unless it's homemade! And you know what? I can't imagine my life without my immersion blender. Yours looks great, Jean.

whiteangel said...

I bet that tastes lovely. I always make home made mayonnaise.

Jacquelineand.... said...

Saving this one Jean; we don't use mayo often but I want the freshest and best when we do... and just got some lovely organic eggs from a friend, so yay!

Quinn said...

I'm curious about the flour, which I've never seen in mayo instructions before. Does it have something to do with using cooked egg instead of raw? (I make a very simple old-style mayo, using organic eggs fresh from my hens, but I'm always interested in experimenting with other methods!)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Angie, thank you! I'm new to the immersion blender, and I'm already wondering how I ever got along without it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

It's so much better, isn't it, whiteangel?!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jacqueline, thank you. It must be wonderful to have a source of good organic eggs nearby!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Quinn, adding that bit of flour (I use tapioca flour, but all-purpose will do) is just something I've always done with the cooked-egg method. I think it might reduce the risk of overcooking the egg, much like when making a stirred custard.

Mocadeaux said...

This reminds me of when I saw a Martha Stewart piece about making your own marshmallows and I thought, "Marshmallows are an ingredient, not something you make!" It never occurred to me to make my own. But this mayo recipe sounds doable AND delicious!! I'll give it a try!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mo, I hope you will make it soon. It is really quite easy and so much better than anything you can buy.

belleau kitchen said...

I think home made mayo is one of life's last luxuries and really it shouldn't be, it's so simple. Yours looks gorgeous. I've never made the cooked egg method before because I don't have an issue with it but it looks so nice I must give it a go!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Dom, thank you so much! And I agree, "one of life's last luxuries." If you try the cooked egg method, do let me know what you think.

Marlene Baird said...

There's nothing better than homemade mayo. MMM!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yeahhh, Marlene! But, shocking as it sounds, I know a few people who actually don't like it! How crazy is that!

Ashley Mullen said...

This is something I've never tried to make, I might have to give it a go sometime. Thank you for linking up to this week's Tasty Tuesday Linky. I am pinning you recipe to the Tasty Tuesday Pinterest board.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ashley, yes, give it a go. And let me know how it turns out for you!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

I haven't made homemade mayo in years, Jean, but I'd like to try your no raw egg version. I don't own an immersion blender, and will need to look up your food processor version.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, I do hope you'll try it. It's easy (though not quite as fast as just using a raw egg!) and so tasty. I'm afraid the only storebought mayonnaise I like is one that is not organic and has GMOs, so I must have homemade.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

I appreciate your visit to my blog, Jean! I look forward to making the mayo recipe!

Stephanie said...

I have never made homemade mayo but have often thought I would try it sometime :) Thank you for an excellent recipe, my dear Jean, and thanks for sharing with Roses of Inspiration. I hope you're able to join us again this week. Hugs!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Stephanie, thank *you*! And I hope you will try it soon -- on some lovely tea sandwiches!

Joanne Young said...

Jean, this mayo is lovely! I used it in a an avocado and tomato sandwich. It gave the sandwich a gusto! :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Joanne! That sounds sooooo good! Must pick up some avocados and tomatoes this week.

sippitysup said...

I've been traveling and although I've peeked at this several times I haven't gotten to comment. I've now arrived at my destination and I have a week of not much to do. I plan to try this mayo. I think it will impress folks. GREG

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Greg, thank you! Let me know how it turns out for you. (I'm so envious -- I need a week of not much to do right now!)

creativelyhomespun said...

This looks amazing!!! Thank you for linking up at the Creative K Kids’ Tasty Tuesdays! I have pinned your post to our Tasty Tuesdays Pinterest Board!! I hope to see you again next week! xo

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, creativelyhomespun! Pins are much appreciated!

Michelle Nahom said...

I need to try this Jean! I've never tried making my own mayo before, but I'd like to!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Michelle, I hope you will -- you'll be amazed!

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

Alas and alack, Jean...I still cook in the dark ages...but my whisking arm isn't giving me any trouble so I should be able to give it a try. I do love the homemade!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, that's wonderful! I love cooking "in the dark ages" when I can!

Swathi Iyer said...

Jean, thanks for sharing recipe of mayonnaise without any raw eggs, yes I won't make it at home, Pinning and tweeting, Thanks once again for sharing with Hearth and soul blog hop.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Swathi, thank you! Pins and tweets are much appreciated! Yes, we are always getting warnings about raw or undercooked eggs and meat, especially for children, elderly people and pregnant women. Since I often cook for people in all those categories, I'd rather just get into the habit of not using raw eggs.

April J Harris said...

Love this recipe, Jean. It's the raw egg that has always put me off making my own mayonnaise! Pinned and will share.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, April! Pins and shares are sooo appreciated! I think you're going to love making your own mayonnaise.

Anonymous said...

You don't get salmonella from raw eggs. IF the egg was contaminated with it, it would be on the shell and an easy way to get rid of that is to run the raw egg under boiling water for a few seconds.

...there are actually more instances of food poisoning from things like spinach than raw eggs.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Anonymous. I'm plenty careful about my spinach, too! Though the chances of foodborne illness from raw eggs might be small, I prefer to follow the recommendation of the American Egg Board that "for egg-containing dishes, cook until an internal temperature of 160F or above has been reached."

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