18 March 2021

Clotted Cream - Stovetop Method

Clotted Cream - Stovetop Method - An Afternoon Tea Essential / www.delightfulrepast.com

As I pointed out in my
Clotted Cream Tutorial, clotted cream, which doesn't sound that appealing to the uninitiated, is the delectable accompaniment to scones that elevates that simple bake to an Occasion. And, of course, it has other delicious applications.

While I couldn't be happier with my Clotted Cream - Oven Method, I have friends whose oven either does not have that low of a temperature setting or does not hold a very steady temperature or will time out before 12 hours is up. I even have friends in studio apartments without an oven. So I wanted to come up with a good and easy stovetop method.

As with the oven method, this does not require your standing at the stove for hours on end. Once you get it going, you can pretty much just go about your business. This must not be stirred or jostled, so it benefits from benign neglect once you have your just-barely-a-simmer temperature established.

Do you love clotted cream as much as I do?


Clotted Cream - Stovetop Method - An Afternoon Tea Essential / www.delightfulrepast.com

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Clotted Cream – Stovetop Method


(Makes about 1 cup)

1 pint (16 fluid ounces/473 ml) heavy whipping cream


1 Fill base of double boiler with water to about 1.5 inches (in mine, that means 1 quart). Bring to barely a simmer. Place double boiler insert over the water. It must not touch the simmering water.

Tip: If you don’t have a double boiler, you can use a stainless steel or glass mixing bowl over a large saucepan.

2 Pour 2 cups (16 fluid ounces/473 ml) of heavy whipping cream into top of double boiler. The cream should not be more than 1 inch deep. Leave the lid off. Check by ear every once in a while to make sure the water is barely simmering. If you have an instant-read thermometer, it should register somewhere in the 185F/85C to 200F/94C range.

3 Gently heat the cream at barely a simmer, uncovered, never stirring, for 3 hours. Being careful to not slosh the cream around, remove the top pan from the base and set it on a wire rack to cool at room temperature for 1 hour. Then cover and refrigerate for 12 hours.

4 Lift up a "corner" of the chilled clotted cream and pour off the liquid* underneath into a 1-cup glass measure; use it in your next batch of scones, pancakes, or whatever you happen to be making. Scoop up layer of clotted cream into jar or serving dish. Keeps for several days, covered and refrigerated. Or you can freeze it

* When you pour off that liquid, you don't have to get every last drop out. Usually the underside of the clotted cream layer is quite wet and might actually drip as you spoon it into a container. The contents of the container can seem quite wet, but it all melds together in the refrigerator.

Note: These cute little 4-ounce freezer-safe canning/storage jars with plastic caps are perfect for clotted cream. One recipe makes two jars. 

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Jean

41 comments:

TONY said...

Clotted Cream. Great stuff, Jean. Reminds me of holidays in Devon and Cornwall.

However, Jean, just so that you know. I won't tell anybody, I promise.

"In 1993, an application was made for the name Cornish clotted cream to have a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) in the European Union for cream produced by the traditional recipe in Cornwall. This was accepted in 1998.[21] Cornish clotted cream must be made from milk produced in Cornwall and have a minimum butterfat content of 55 percent.[22] The unique, slightly yellow, Cornish clotted cream colour is due to the high carotene levels in the grass.[22]"

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Tony! I love that Cornwall got the PDO on that. Has Devonshire gotten protected status for their clotted cream as well?

TONY said...

Probably. If the place name is in front of it such as Scotch Whisky or Cheddar Cheese etc they are usually protected. I do realise you can get away with not having Cornish or Devon in front of the name. It’s a minefield really. Cheddar cheese is an interesting one because the real stuff can only be made from the milk from about twenty farms in Devon and Somerset but versions of it are made all over the world.

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

That is an easy enough recipe. I wish my hubby liked it. I had bought some one time at a tea room {it had been imported from Britain} and he didn't like it. So I tried making a 'mock' clotted cream and he didn't like that either. It has to be whipped cream or he won't it. *le sigh* The things we women do for our men! ;-) Thank you for stopping by and Happy Spring!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, I love the brands of US cheddar I buy, but I'm sure they're nothing like true Cheddar. That's why I've taken to not capitalizing the word.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

That's so true, Sandi, "the things we do ... !" He may have a mental block about it. Must admit, "clotted" does not sound like something desirable! 😁

Margie said...

Yes, I love clotted cream too! It really elevates the scones!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Clotted cream has my eyes convinced it tastes like whipped cream. Definitely an illusion, I’m sure. Probably more like sour cream. Yeah, my sweet tooth is the guardian at the gate. Still back thinking of toad-in-a-hole. Then again, if my lessened expectations are informing me of anything, it’s a perfect match for tea and scones. Wish I had Jean’s genes. Then I could join civilized society and explore the whole pantry.

Lowcarb team member said...

Clotted cream is such a lovely treat ...

All the best Jan

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

That's a great way to put it, Margie! It definitely elevates the scones.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, though clotted cream does not have any added sugar, there is a certain sweetness to it. Nothing at all like sour cream or cheese of any kind. I think the long slow cooking caramelizes some of the milk sugar/lactose and enhances the sweetness. You really must try it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jan. Wish it was readily available over here.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Love clotted cream! And I haven't had it in a very long time. And I've never made it. Really should try this -- it seems pretty easy. Thanks!

Angie's Recipes said...

Such a wonderful treat! We love scones and this definitely is something I should try myself too.

Nancy said...

I do love the stuff. I’ve had great success making it with your oven method so I’m anxious to try the stove top version. I got a new range a while back that is very efficient. I’m a little hesitant about leaving the oven on for 12 hours now though. Just my hang up. I also like Chantilly cream a lot. Keep up the good work.

Jeanie said...

I was just talking with a friend last week about scones and clotted cream and we were both thinking we should look up a recipe for it before we (someday) were able to get together again. Thank you! Your timing is perfect! Happy Spring!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

I am thinking that I will need to use my magnetic induction burner for this, as my electric stovetop is just not reliable enough to keep the temperature steady. This post also reminded me that I need to check and see if my oven temperature goes low enough to try the oven version. Thanks for both the reminder of the oven recipe and this now stovetop version!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Thank you for this easy method, Jean! I’ll have to try this for my next tea party.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

John, it IS really easy. Just a matter of getting the heat right and letting it do its thing. I have a gas stove and have next to know experience with electric or induction, but I'm hoping some will comment on that.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. It will be a wonderful accompaniment to some of your beautiful bakes!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Nancy. I don't mind doing the 12 hours during the day, but I would not be able to sleep at night if I had the oven on!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thank you. And I couldn't wait till a friend and I got together, so I took one of the two little jars of cream and a half batch of scones over to her, then went home and put the kettle on so we could have a cream tea "together" separately! Strange times! 😜

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, I was thinking about getting an induction burner as a sixth burner for big meals, but then the pandemic hit and knocked out entertaining, so I haven't acquired one yet. Let me know how it works for this. I love the oven method, but this will be good for those days when I have other things going on with the oven.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Kitty. And, besides teatime, it has other applications. A "tea" friend I share my clotted cream with enjoys a cup of hot chocolate in the evening with a dollop of clotted cream on top.

Vee said...

Bookmarking this recipe...sounds pretty easy. Would you believe that I have never tasted clotted cream? This needs to change!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Vee! You've never tasted clotted cream?! Yes, that needs to change!

Sherry's Pickings said...

i love clotted cream. definitely brings back memories of doing huge walks in the UK then going for an afternoon tea with scones and cream. i've never thought of making it myself!

Sherry's Pickings said...

not sure if my comment worked. just saying i love clotted cream and how you buy it in wooden boxes! brings back the memories of backpacking in the UK.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sherry, those are great memories! The walking/hiking in the UK is superb with all the trails and footpaths. And tea breaks along the way! Yes, I hope you'll make some clotted cream soon!

April Harris said...

There is nothing like homemade clotted cream! Thank you for sharing this stovetop method, Jean. I must confess, I have never made my own clotted cream as it is easy to buy here in the UK, but I love the idea of homemade as it's fresher and much more bespoke! I will definitely have to give this recipe a try. Thank you for sharing and for being a part of the Hearth and Soul Link Party Community. Take care, and I hope you are having a lovely weekend!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you so much. Do you have a source for organic clotted cream there? I use only organic dairy, so I make this with cream from a regional organic dairy. I've never seen any organic among the imported shelf-stable clotted creams I can occasionally find.

Denise at Forest Manor said...

Hi Jean,

Thanks so much for your visit -- I'm glad to see that you like chicken pies, too!! :) Wow, your clotted cream looks and sounds so delicious! I visited England with my husband back in 1999, as he was over there on a project for work. While there, I wanted to try as many traditional English foods as possible. One day while we were in London, I got a scone with clotted cream at a little shop there. I can barely remember it, so I'd love to try it again. I also ate a beef pie, grilled lambchop, delicious fish and chips, traditional English breakfast, and as many wonderful "puddings" as I could. :D

I enjoy visiting your blog, and thanks so much for all the good recipes you share here. Have a wonderful week!!

Hugs,

Denise

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Denise, thank you so much. AND for sharing culinary highlights of your trip to England. You may have noticed, I do a lot of English cooking and baking! I hope you'll try the clotted cream, whether the stovetop or the oven method, and let me know how it turned out for you. Stay safe and well! Happy Spring!

Marilyn Miller said...

I am almost tempted to try this.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Marilyn, I hope you will! Let me know.

Phil in the Kitchen said...

I know I can buy clotted cream easily enough here but this is a very useful technique. I know quite a few English people who have moved to various parts of Europe in the last decade or two and they'll sometimes list the things they miss about England. Top of the lists will be things like playing darts in a pub with a pint of real ale (which is odd because very few people in England do that these days), fish and chips, British sausages, raised pork pies and clotted cream. The next time that someone wistfully mentions clotted cream, I promise I'll point them in the direction of this method.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Phil, thank you so much. It would be on my list of things I'd miss about England! I'm going to make more tomorrow to take to a friend on Thursday.

ellen b. said...

Thank you for this. I'll have to bookmark this for my enjoy Britain without being able to visit Britain treats!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Ellen. Yes, I think there are a lot of us looking for ways to enjoy Britain right here at home!

Sherry's Pickings said...

clotted cream - ah that brings back the memories of walking all over the UK in our younger days.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Good stuff. And where else in the world are walking trails punctuated by tea stops?!

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