14 April 2022

One-Bowl Guinness Chocolate Cake

Guinness Chocolate Cake - Easy and Has No Eggs or Dairy / www.delightfulrepast.com

Guinness Chocolate Cake can be done as a single 8-inch layer with a simple icing or dusting of powdered sugar or as two 6-inch layers filled and frosted. But unless it's going on the afternoon tea table, I just make the single layer. With whipped cream, above, or a thin layer of icing, below.


Guinness Chocolate Cake - Easy, Egg-Free, Dairy-Free / www.delightfulrepast.com


Made without eggs or butter, Guinness Chocolate Cake also just happens to be vegan. I once saved a piece for four days, just for test purposes, and it was still fresh and fabulous! I had thought it might dry out since it has no eggs.

What does the Guinness add to the cake? What does it taste like? I can't really describe it, but it's different. The Guinness enhances the chocolate flavor and gives it a slightly tangy, malty flavor—a bit of an "edge," you might say.

Another thing you'll love about it is that it is so easy and no-muss-no-fuss. No need for a stand mixer or even a hand mixer. A one-bowl cake that will never wear you out or let you down!


Guinness Chocolate Cake - Easy and Has No Eggs or Dairy / www.delightfulrepast.com

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Guinness Chocolate Cake


(Makes one 8-inch round layer)

1 1/3 dip-and-sweep cups (6.67 ounces/189 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 cup (7 ounces/198 grams) sugar
1/3 packed cup (1 ounce/28 grams) natural unsweetened cocoa
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cup (10 fluid ounces/296 ml) Guinness stout
1/4 cup (2 fluid ounces/59 ml OR 1.875 ounces/53 grams) extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 Grease and flour one 8-inch round 2-inch deep cake pan (Don't even bother with shallow cake pans!). And a circle of parchment paper in the bottom will ensure successful removal from the pan, if you have that concern. Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. 


Note: If you want to get fancy and make a sweet little layer cake (the size I make for an afternoon tea), divide the batter between two 6-inch round 2-inch deep cake pans and bake for 30 to 35 minutes. (I also love, and have several, Fat Daddio's cake pans.)

2 In a 2-quart bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda, and salt. Add Guinness, oil, and vanilla extract. Whisk vigorously for about a minute, or until smooth. Pour into prepared pan. Run a knife through the batter a few times to break up any large air bubbles. Bake for about 35 to 45 minutes, or until it tests done with a toothpick.

Note: When measuring the stout in a 2-cup glass measure, let it stand a minute for the foam to settle and make sure the liquid, not the foam, comes up to the mark.

3 Let cool in pan on wire rack for 10 minutes. Invert onto the rack to cool completely. 


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Jean

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29 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Filled and frosted, please. Oh, yes, this is my mother’s chocolate cake (though I don’t quite get the wizardry that permits eggs and butter to be replaced by Guinness Stout and olive oil). Paired with milk in a saucer, and devoured with the largest spoon in the silverware drawer, I am satiated and inebriated with or without the Guinness. 5 cleavers.

Lynn said...

I have used beer in bread mixes before, but never considered it for sweets. This
sounds tasty and you've shown it keeps well. For only 2 of us here, things must
store well in the fridge or freeze to bake anything "full" size. Lynn and Precious

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sully. Chocolate cake does pair well with milk. I never drink the stuff anymore, but I think I might try a glass with my next slice of cake. Let's raise a glass to alcohol-free inebriation!

TONY said...

Ok Jean. A great Irish Guinness, as drunk in a Kilkenny bar for instance, is poured slowly. Usually the barman will line up half a dozen glasses along the bar top and proceed from the first glass to the last pouring a little into each and then returning to the first glass and so on until each glass is full to the top , topped with a thick creamy layer over a pitch black liquid. It tastes malty, smooth and creamy with a slight bitterness to it. Its' lovely!! One pint goes down smoothly. A second pint goes down smoothly. By your fifth pint you are aglow and able to talk for Ireland, South London or where you live Jean. Guinness has a lot of iron in it. It is great for the blood , the brain and sociability. Your cake takes the biscuit, Jean. Well done.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Lynn! I just store the unfrosted cake, covered tightly, at room temperature. Keeps very well. Hope you'll like it.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Tony! A half pint is my limit, for just about any liquid (except tea), not just Guinness. My mother told me my grandmother was served Guinness in hospital in England. Maybe for the iron.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Guinness and chocolate? Yes, please! LOVE that combo. But I love chocolate. And Guinness! I guess I'm so predictable. :-) Anyway, this looks like an excellent cake. Thanks!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

John, thank you! I love your enthusiasm! Hope you'll try it soon.

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

YUM, that looks scrumptious! Now if I could figure out how to make it without Guinness and sugar :) Thanks so much for linking up at the Crafty Creators Link Party 14. Pinned.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Dee, that IS the tricky bit, isn't it? Thanks so much.

Rustic Pumpkin said...

It was such a good news day when it was announced that Guinness is now appropriate for Vegans. I think this cake is a must try, as Guinness and chocolate are so good together. I often soak fruit in it before making fruit cakes, such as Bara Brith.

Rustic Pumpkin said...

p.s. as a child, my then G.P. prescribed warm stout and milk for my anaemia!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

D, I don't think I could take warm stout and milk, though I'd rather take it than another popular anaemia food, calve's liver! But now you've got me craving Bara Brith. Love it and haven't made it in a while.

Prims By The Water said...

Me loves anything chocolate. TFS Janice

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Janice. AND for teaching me a new SM abbreviation (had to look it up)!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Your tea cake looks delightful, Jean! I like a one bowl method for easy cleanup!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Kitty! And you're so right about the easy cleanup! I appreciate that more and more all the time.

Sherry's Pickings said...

ooh yum how delicious. i like the idea of making it without eggs, just for interest's sake alone. The more icing the better i say :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sherry, thanks. Yes, you must try it, "just for interest's sake alone" (love that)!

David Scott Allen said...

I’ve never had this famous cake — and since I don’t drink beer, this seems the perfect use for one of those bottles left behind by guests. Thanks, and hope you are having a wonderful weekend!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, David. And I hope you'll try my version, which you'll find less sweet. And you'll be amazed at the wonderful texture it has without eggs and butter. And a little Bailey's won't go amiss in the frosting or whipped cream!

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

There are a couple of bottles of Guinness in the fridge, I know just what I'll use one for. My husband particularly likes a simple cake like this.

Phil in the Kitchen said...

That's a fine cake. Beer and chocolate is a lovely combination in my opinion. I find that beer gives chocolate a boost without adding sweetness and I'm sure that this cake would be an excellent combo. I did combine beer and an intense, dark chocolate in a cake a short while ago which worked well for me and for friends who love dark almost bitter chocolate but it didn't go down at all well with those who prefer a sweeter, softer taste.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Karen, thanks. Let me know how you two like it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Phil. I know you make fines cake yourself! I hope you'll try this one and let me know how it compares to the other one.

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

All I need is the stout to make this cake. It looks so tasty

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Gerlinde! Hope you're having a great weekend!

Denise at Forest Manor said...

Hi Jean,

Boy, this cake looks sooo good!!! I like your pretty plate, too. ;D I will certainly have to try this cake -- the sooner the better. I have a list right now of goodies I'm planning to bake, and this is on the list now. There is something so satisfying about adding a new recipe to our repertoire, no? I've already pinned this recipe, Jean, and thank you so much for sharing! I hope you have a great week!

Hugs,

Denise

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Denise, thanks so much. I hope you enjoy it as much as we do. I think you might like what I'm posting on Thursday as well.

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