19 February 2015

How to Make Clotted Cream - Also, a Bit of a Rant

Scone with Clotted Cream and Jam / www.delightfulrepast.com

Before I get to the homemade clotted cream, would you mind if I went off on a bit of a rant about a totally unrelated matter? I didn't think so!


Clotted Cream / www.delightfulrepast.com

The Rant


This has been brewing for a while. The daughter of an avid reader and magazine aficionado, I've been reading magazines since I was four years old. I love magazines. You might have read about my magazine addiction. I even write for magazines. 

But, more and more, I find my enjoyment of magazines being interrupted by annoyances. And then, of course, I annoy my husband and interrupt his reading with my outbursts. "Ha, listen to this!" Followed by my reading the offending phrase, sentence or paragraph aloud in a derisive tone. 

As a writer, one must adapt one's style to that of the publication. So I've written magazine articles that made me chuckle at my own high-flown turn of phrase. I understand that. But there are a couple of overused, misused terms that have no place in the food world. 

Last night I was happily reading along in a popular food mag when I came upon "creating a rule-breaking food scene all their own." When I stopped gagging, I sneeringly read the complete sentence aloud to my husband and proceeded to tell him more than he wanted to know about just why the sentence was ridiculous. 

I kept reading but never found out what rules were being broken by these food producers who harvested and cooked local ingredients. Called "mavericks" by the author, they seemed to be doing what farmers, fishermen and chefs everywhere are doing, working on new ways to make use of local ingredients. 

Yes, do tell me about a place and its food, about those who grow, harvest and cook that food. That's interesting enough in itself without embellishing it with nonsense. 

Second only to "rule-breaking" on my list of food writing peeves is "risk-taking." Oh.My.Goodness! Maybe it's not second after all, maybe it's first, at least tied for first. If you're going to tell me about a chef taking risks, you better be talking about one who is setting speed records chopping blind-folded or deep-frying in the nude. 

With more than 13 percent of the world not having enough food, isn't it time for us all to get over our pretentiousness about food?
"If you're going to tell me about a chef taking risks, you better be talking about one who is setting speed records chopping blind-folded or deep-frying in the nude." ~ Jean | Delightful Repast

The Clotted Cream


Okay, I'm done. On to the clotted cream, which doesn't sound that appealing to the uninitiated. You'll sometimes see it called Devonshire cream just because it sounds better, but it's only Devonshire cream if it is clotted cream made in Devonshire. Cornish cream is clotted cream made in Cornwall. 


Scone with Clotted Cream and Jam / DelightfulRepast.com

Here in the US, imported clotted cream is quite expensive and few tea rooms make their own. So it's usually only seen at the poshest of afternoon teas. Its unique taste and texture take a simple scone to new heights. In Devon, the tradition is to put cream on the scone first, then jam. In Cornwall, it's jam first, then cream. 

Update 08/25/16: Fresh Peach Scones don't need jam, but would be great with a dollop of clotted cream.

Update 12/07/16: For how to throw an afternoon tea party and a roundup of afternoon tea recipes, see Afternoon Tea Party Tips.


Pot of Clotted Cream / www.delightfulrepast.com

There's nothing difficult about making clotted cream. Though it does take time, it's time you actually spend going about your business while the cream does its thing. So I don't know why there are so many "mock" versions out there. 

One popular American television personality and celebrity chef would have you strain cream through a coffee filter and call it clotted cream. Sorry, that's just not the real deal. Others would have you add various things to whipped cream. Again, no, just no. 

Some people prefer to make it with raw cream, but pasteurized cream works just as well. I haven't actually tried it with ultra-pasteurized cream, but I'm told it doesn't work well. Besides having been heated to higher temperatures, ultra-pasteurized creams contain added stabilizers.

Update 09/10/16I have used organic heavy whipping creams minimally pasteurized, pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized; none were homogenized. All worked well. I have yet to try this with a popular organic brand that is both ultra-pasteurized and homogenized.  

There are two ways to make clotted cream in your oven: covered and uncovered. I made it both ways and then conducted an informal blind tasting (also known as serving tea and scones to my husband and friend).


Clotted Cream Two Versions / www.delightfulrepast.com
Left: cream cooked covered / Right: cream cooked uncovered

He preferred the texture of the cream that had been uncovered, but she and I preferred the cream that had been covered. Here is what they looked like just out of the oven:


Clotted Cream Cooked Covered / www.delightfulrepast.com
Clotted Cream Cooked Covered
Clotted Cream Cooked Uncovered / delightfulrepast.com
Clotted Cream Cooked Uncovered

The cream that was cooked covered developed a softer top layer and had a smoother texture. The cream cooked uncovered developed a buttery yellow "crust" and after cooling and stirring had tiny bits of yellow butter throughout the finished cream.

Though we were divided on which we thought was best, we all thought both versions were very good.
  
Since the finished clotted cream only keeps for a few days (some say as long as 2 weeks, but I haven't tested it yet), it's best to make no more than you need. My friend really loves it and has no problem using it up! She says adding a dollop to a mug of hot chocolate is unimaginably good. 

Update 12/09/16: I've found that the clotted cream freezes beautifully, with no loss of quality, and so divide the cream between two 4-ounce jars and pop them into the freezer.

Do let me know if you have any questions or comments about the recipe (or the rant!). And if you like this post, be sure to Pin it and share it on your social media! 


Clotted Cream 



(Makes about 1 cup) 

1 pint (16 fluid ounces, 473 ml) pasteurized organic heavy whipping cream

Note: I like to put it in the oven at 6 a.m. and take it out at 6 p.m., refrigerate it until 6 a.m. the next morning, then scoop it into a container.

1 Preheat oven to 180F/82C. 

2 Pour cream into an 8-inch (20 cm) diameter baking dish (I use a Pyrex). It can be any shape, as long as the cream is about 1/2 to 1 inch (1.25 to 2.5 cm) deep.


Clotted Cream Step One / www.delightfulrepast.com
A pint of organic heavy (40% butterfat) whipping cream in 8-inch baking dish

3 Place foil-covered or uncovered (I prefer to cook it covered--see the comparison above) dish of cream in preheated oven and set timer for 12 hours.

4 Remove from oven, lift foil a bit to vent, and let cool at room temperature for 30 minutes; cover and refrigerate for 12 hours. 

5 Using a flattish spoon, scoop up layer of clotted cream into jar or serving dish. Keeps for about 3 days, covered and refrigerated. Save the leftover liquid in the pan to use in your next batch of scones, pancakes or whatever you happen to be making. I like to make Classic Cream Scones with the leftover cream.

Now put the kettle on and Make a Proper Cup of Tea

76 comments:

Anne said...

Love, love your rant and agree with every word. Clotted cream has been on my "one day I must try this" list for years - maybe this is the nudge I need. It looks divine whether covered or uncovered.

Mike said...

My biggest pet peeve in food blog writing (and a lot of comments under the article) is the inane "it's to die for!"

I'm a fan of exaggeration - Being a Texan, I've used it myself at least a zillion times. -wink- Joking aside, I get so annoyed at that phrase.

To die for? Really? You'd die for creamy fudge/pumpkin pie/rib eye roast/loaded mashed potatoes, etc.? I can think of only two things I'd literally die for: my family and my country and it would have to be a darn good reason for the last. (that's why they send unquestioning young men into battle and not old cynical coots like me)

There, MY rant is over. Sorry 'bout that.

I met a woman from Oxford online several yrs. ago and she came to see me several times. We used to exchange pkgs. and I'd send her those red peanut patties made here in Texas, jerky, dry ranch dressing mix (she'd never had that! Or fried okra and several other things) She'd send me British candy and teas, but the best thing she ever sent was some clotted cream fudge. I couldn't stop eating it and I very nearly died from a sugar OD. It wasn't "to die for" but it was darn delicious.

Amy at love made my home said...

I really like the crusty bits of clotted cream and the non crusty bits of clotted cream! I will eat any clotted cream!!! It is delicious. I had no idea that you could make it yourself though, you are so clever! I am with you on the ridiculous language, I mean if you drill down into the blue sky thinking is the concept really wearing trousers... Need I say more!!! That doesn't even make sense does it and yet these are all jargon phrases that are popular! Stick the cream, that is much nicer! xx

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Anne, thank you! I was a bit worried about posting my rant. You really must try the clotted cream soon. It is sooooo easy!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mike, yes, that's a good one, too! I've never said it myself, not once.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Amy, LOL! You really know how to pack a sentence full of jargon!

Pauline Wiles said...

Hah: I don't scrutinize the wording of food articles too closely, but I agree that language is getting quite strange and standards of editing are definitely slipping. Even my beloved BBC News website has had typos recently.
I've never found the name "clotted" very appealing, but yes, it really does taste great. I'm not sure I've tried it in hot chocolate but will do so at the first opportunity...

Cranberry Morning said...

That's IT??! That's all there is to making clotted cream? Not only did I pin this, but I bookmarked the page, just to be double sure that I can find it again.

Also, agreed with the rant. People can get so weird about food. And I agree with Mike's pet peeve, 'it's to die for.' How ridiculous.

P.S. I'm pretty sure I'd like the 'covered' better than the 'uncovered.'

Christine said...

I am so excited ! I had clotted cream on my one and only trip to England when a blog friend threw a proper tea for me. I love that stuff! I can't wait to make it. Now...have you ever posted a tutorial on scone making?

I couldn't agree more with your rant. :)

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Hello Jean,
Your clotted cream sounds easy enough to make. I've made my own yogurt somewhat like that. I have made "Devonshire cream" and I love it but Hubby doesn't care for it unfortunately, so I seldom make it. Thanks for sharing your recipe and joining me for Tea Time.

Blessings,
Sandi

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pauline, yes, the typos are everywhere--even BBC News. Maybe all the editors were on a tea break!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Judy, yes! That IS all there is to it! Amazing, right? Let me know how it turns out for you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Christine, you *must* let me know when you make the clotted cream. I want to hear all about it! No, I haven't done a tutorial on scones, but if you read my scone recipe carefully, you will pick up lots of tips.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sandi, thank you. Such fun! As my husband always says, "You teabags sure know how to have a good time"!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Can’t wait to try chopping blindfolded or deep frying in the nude. I’m thinking it would cross over from risk-taking to damn-foolhardy to do both at the same time. No need to end a cooking fiasco with a trip to ER. So, does the Captain return the out-loud reading favors, and if so, what does he read? … Dare I hope, that your mention of the bastardized use of whipped cream to create clotted cream means that the latter is somewhat sweet? Looks great in the photo, but combined with the biscuit – I mean scone – I think I would require something sweet to get it down. Yeah, I know – jam. Jury deliberating…

Judith @ Lavender Cottage said...

Thanks for dropping by my post linked to Sandi's tea gathering. My husband figures the Wisteria Tea Room in Ft. Myers is a 15-20 drive from the airport.
I hope you get a chance to visit, the staff is very friendly and accommodating.
I buy a jar of imported Devonshire Cream when I want a special treat, otherwise I just like lemon curd or marmalade on my scones.

Angie Schneider said...

I don't even seen clotted cream over here..didn't know it was this easy to make. Thanks, Jean, for sharing this great recipe.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Funny you should ask that, Sully. Himself had the same thought. And as I said to him, clotted cream has the natural very slight sweetness of cream. Those who like a more pronounced sweetness are invited to, you guessed it, use a bit of jam or lemon curd.

Pom Pom said...

Yummy. I wish someone would make some clotted cream for me!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Judith, thanks for the info. I'll pass it along to people I know in Florida.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pom Pom, it's so easy you can, quite literally, make it in your sleep. It really just makes itself! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Angie, you're so welcome. I thought for sure they'd have it there!

Selma from eclectichomelife.blogspot.com said...

Fabulous post. Couldn't agree more with your rant. Thanks for bringing it to the public forefront. Hopefully it will be seen and noted. Love clotted cream. My problem is I could never decide if I am a Devon or Cornwall woman. So I always eat two, one for each county! Might just give it a go in making my own now though. Again thanks for the share

Jacquelineand.... said...

Your rant is definitely spot-on Jean... and let's not forget that it's historically inaccurate as well. I mean, really, the real risk-takers were the folks who figured out (the hard way) what was edible, and what wasn't.

I'll be surprising my Great Scot with some clotted cream this weekend, thank you for this!

Lucy Corry - The Kitchenmaid said...

I don't know what I like best about this post, the rant or the easy clotted cream!
Thank you, Jean, for such an entertaining read (and useful). My absolute, number one, all-time pet peeve is people who say something is DEVINE. ARGH! Is it so hard to spellcheck and see that it is DIVINE? (Usually, it's used to describe something that looks/sounds anything but, which only makes it worse. Like a news story that starts off with 'it's official' - then goes on to describe nothing of the sort.
I think I need some clotted cream to help me calm down... thanks for the useful tips, I've also seen it made in a slow-cooker, which could be handy (if, unlike me, you had one!)
All best, Lucy
p.s I love Mike's 'to die for' comment above too!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Selma, thank you. And I do hope you'll give it a go. You'll be amazed!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Jacqueline, I'm so glad. Be sure to let me know how it turned out for you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lucy, thanks so much for your "devine" comment. Like Mike's, it was "to die for." :D (Couldn't resist!) But, seriously, I do so appreciate your feedback.

Mary Fisher said...

Mary from Kimball Brook Farm
Hi, It is 26 hours since I started the clotted cream. I am very happy with the results with a few exceptions. I think my oven may be a bit hot. I covered the dish, yet the cream still browned a bit. I have mixed it up and it looks a bit chunky and darker than cream, BUT it is delicious!!! So I am very happy. I will try this again and again with our heavenly Kimball Brook Farm organic heavy cream. I am sure to get the lighter color and texture, even tho the brown, chunky is delicious. I must now make your scones so I have something proper to spread it on.
I am headed to your Cucumber Tea Sandwiches now, because I have a long over due comment for there!
Thank you for the clotted cream recipe, I have been meaning to make it and so glad I have finally begun. Cheers!

Mary Fisher said...

Hi Jean, It's Mary again from Kimball Brook Farm. I can't seem to find your Cucumber Tea Sandwiches. I just wanted to share a little story with you about my time using your recipe, but I hate to do it here under the clotted cream. So if you have a way to hear my story, let me know, I would love to share it.
Thanks again for the clotted cream. I will keep you posted and when I get it photo worthy, I will share it with you on twitter. Cheers!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mary, maybe try turning your oven down 10 degrees and covering your dish with a double layer of foil. Are you using a fairly heavy dish? Maybe set it on a small baking sheet in the oven.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mary, about the cucumber sandwiches, I know I've posted them as a guest blogger, but I thought I'd also posted them here on DR. Well, I will remedy that next week! In the meantime, you can find my email address under my picture in the sidebar.

Susan J Meyerott, M.S. said...

Jean what a delightful rule-breaking rant cooked up with a topping of clotted cream! It's to die for! You took a risk...and boy did you get a great and fun response!

To Mike--the phrase 'It's to die for' is always in good taste in the 'Cereal Murder' Mystery Series...or in 'Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe' (which contains one of my favorite lines--When the French Chef was asked if he had killed of of the chefs he was known to fight with he replied, "Why would I kill him? He was my enemy!).

I have never had clotted cream...but it sure sounds like something I'd like. And how easy is that recipe? The oven does all the work.

Thank you for breaking the rules and showing us how easy it is to make this expensive-if-purchased delight!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, thank you so much! :D Yes, I'm a real to-die-for, risk-taking rule-breaker! LOL I do think you would love clotted cream.

Sippity Sup said...

You are right about the word clotted not being very appealing. Fortunately we know better. GREG

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, Greg, though it's a wonder I ever tried something called "clotted"!

Ruth W said...

I have never liked the "mock" but then I'm from a Brit family & married to a Brit who spent a month in the UK every year for 30 years! Yours is the best recipe I've seen...I usually have used...when I was younger and used to make it...a scalded cream that sat overnight but was very touching and didn't always work quite right. I always liked the top crust best actually! I will be posting a link to your blog recipe posting next Sunday if that's okay with you...So nice to meet you, and thanks for linking to Tuesday Cuppa Tea!
Ruth

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ruth, thank you so much! And I'd be happy to have you link to the post! I look forward to reading your post.

Bonnie said...

I enjoyed reading both your rant and making of clotted cream. I've always want to make the cream, but thought using whipped cream a bit..... wrong. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Enjoy the weekend, Bonnie

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Bonnie, thank you. And I'm glad you liked both rant and recipe!

bj said...

hahhaa....i had to giggle at "one puts cream on, then jelly...and the other,jelly, then cream. That's like some think coffee is better if you put sugar in your cup first, before pouring the coffee.
I've never tried clotted cream...the name itself "turns me off"...(gosh, at all the expressions we use..)
Whipped cream ...now...we're talking. :)
Great instructions for the cream making. I always enjoy your posts.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, BJ! I know, the name IS a real turn-off, but it's soooo good!

Bernideen said...

Such a great instructional posting and very pleased you shared this at Friends Sharing Tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Bernideen, thank you! Like you, I love all things tea!

Yenta Mary said...

Just like with televised food shows, which make the Food Network look like the Game Show Network, and "reality" t.v. look like an episode of "Cops," it's all about the drama now, rather than the food. Admittedly, as someone who also writes about food, there can sometimes be some drudgery, some repetition, some desire to liven things up; and sometimes we really want to convey how really spectacular something is. But terms are so melodramatic and overused that they lose any impact, now ... which, of course, only encourages more of same. Sigh ....

Tony Grant said...

Absolutely love your rant, Jean. You, actually we all, should do it more often.

I think Y|OU were taking some risk making with this absolutely brilliant comment, "setting speed records chopping blind-folded or deep-frying in the nude." Love it. My imagination ran riot!!!Ha! ha! All sorts of very dangerous combinations come to mind.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Mary. I can't even watch those food shows. Revolting! I recently watched The Great British Baking Show on PBS, and it was so civilized. Why can't they do something like that on American television?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, thanks! Not sure, but I think that might have been my first rant on the blog!

Donna (Bountiful Hunter) said...

Great post Jean. Love your rant and I'm with you on the pretentiousness of food. As much as I love the stuff and enjoy writing about it, it has become silly in some instances. Our favourite term in our household is "plating up" a term coined from all the Masterchef and cooking programs here in Australia! As for your clotted cream....love the name and the cream. I'm a Cornish girl at heart..jam first! Memories of travels to the UK when I finished my nursing here in Australia. "Tea" was one of the few meals we could afford as backpackers and the clotted cream stuck to our bones for days! Keep ranting! Ill give the uncovered version a try...

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Donna, thank you! Do let me know how it turns out for you. Your "plating up" reminded me of another one. On shows I've seen in US they don't just "bake" cookies, for example; they "bake off" the cookies.

Swathi Iyer said...

Yes I agree with you. I haven't had clotted cream, since I like milk and its products, sure I will try it for myself. Thanks for introducing a new cream to go with scones. Loved that you shared with Hearth and soul blog hop, pinning, tweeting and sharing in google plus.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Swathi! And I so appreciate the shares on social media.

April J Harris said...

Loved your rant, Jean - I'm still giggling about the 'deep frying in the nude' part :-) You definitely have a point though!!! Thank you for sharing this recipe with us at the Hearth and Soul hop. I didn't realise you could make Clotted Cream at home - it's wonderful to know how! I think both versions look great!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you for "hopping"! Glad you liked my rant as well the clotted cream!

Wilder-Ness said...

I wonder if your clotted cream recipe could be done in a slow-cooker, which easily maintains a steady low temperature for a long time... Has anyone tried it?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, lots of people have done the slow-cooker method, but I prefer the oven. Some slow cookers, even the same model, have different minimum temperatures, possibly not low enough. To me, the oven is just ideal for this.

Mum in Brum said...

Wow this looks incredible Jean - I just want to sink my face into it!:)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Mum in Brum! It really is wonderful. Hope you'll make some soon.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Hi Jean,
It's so nice to meet you! I would love to try the clotted cream recipe. Thank you for sharing both versions.
I appreciate your visit to my blog.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, I was glad I found your delightful blog today! Looking forward to many more visits.

Melanie said...

Loved your rant; the deep frying in the nude image made me laugh out loud - that WOULD be risky.

I had no idea clotted cream was that simple. Will try that the next time I bake your scones.(I made 4 batches of them recently to bring to a work breakfast event; there were none leftover. People asked me for the recipe saying they had no idea scones could be so good.)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Melanie, so good to hear from you! How've you been? Thank you so much, you just made my day!

Kathy said...

Well, darn it! I tried to make up the clotted cream and ended up with, well, cooked cream. That's still runny. I didn't use ultrapasturized cream, I set the oven as best I could (dial that manually turns) and had the cream in there for 12 hours. Was the temperature too hot? Too cold?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Hi Kathy, darn is right! Have you checked your oven temperature? Oven thermometers are very inexpensive and can help you in knowing how to set your temperature for recipes. And it can help you determine whether your oven has hot spots, so you can know where to put stuff. If your oven is way off, you might need to have it re-calibrated. But I know a lot of people who if they find that there oven is x number of degrees off just set it that many degrees lower or higher than a recipe calls for.

Did you cool it at room temperature for 30 minutes, then refrigerate it for 8 to 12 hours? It makes all the difference.

Anonymous said...

My boyfriend is from southern England, I'm surprising him to homemade scones with cream and jam because he told me its "impossible" to find clotted cream around here :) my Granny has always said "the way to a mans heart is through his stomach"

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Anonymous, I'm so excited about this -- your getting to try it out on someone from southern England! Do let me know how it turns out for you. You'll also find a few different scone recipes here, as well as crumpets and English muffins.

Myna Bird said...

Thank you so much! I live in NZ we cannot get raw milk products here so it was always assumed we couldn't make this.
We had elderly neighbours who did lovely tea but always really wanted clotted cream.
I will be making this to test and then so I can offer a nice Devon or Cornish tea for my friends :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Myna Bird, I'm so happy to help! I do hope it turns out well for you, it will be such a treat for your friends! Let me know how it goes. If you have any difficulties, maybe we can put our heads together and sort it out.

Charulie said...

Hi, Jean. What a lovely new recipe! I love the saucier pan I won in the giveaway on my birthday. Thank you, again. Charulie@msn.com

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Julie, thank you. I hope you'll make this. It is shockingly easy, and it's the real deal! So glad you're enjoying the pan. It is just about my favorite pan!

Emma Coles said...

Hi Jean - thanks for the recipe. My family is from Devon, and I moved from the UK 16 years ago so proper clotted cream is something I miss! I'm going to try to make this this week. On the crust vs no-crust debate - in Devon it's not proper clotted cream without a crust!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Emma, I'm so glad you found my recipe! Please let me know how it turns out for you. (BTW I'm a "cream first, then jam" girl!)

Anon said...

Hi! The "buttery crust" is part of the goodness of clotted cream! All Clotted cream in London has it. One does not stir clotted cream one just spoons it out, onto the scone, or biscuit, here in the USA. The scones should not be sweet; one gets the sweetness from the jam or lemon curd. Thank you for posting. I can not find the proper cream, and have suffered many failures...sad

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Hello, Anon. Thank you. Always happy to hear from a clotted cream fan! So many scones are too sweet. Like you, I think the sweetness of the jam or lemon curd is plenty. I hope you'll try this method for clotted cream. Since I experimented and found how well my little pots of clotted cream do in the freezer, I'm going to make double batches. NOT in a larger dish, but in two dishes the same size I used here. I'm not going to mess with something that works so well!

Leah Z said...

Thank you so much for this recipe!
I needed to make a whole lot of cream, but got the last quart of pasteurized heavy cream and needed another. So I followed your advice and tried ultra pasteurized cream as well.
As a side by side comparison (they were in the oven together, then the fridge together) I found that while the ultra pasteurized cream did work, the result was less firm, and when whipped up got quite a bit looser, where as the pasteurized cream was thick and remained thick and creamy even after mixing up. So I put them together and ended up with the perfect consistency. Mine also developed that yellow crust even though I covered it, one was covered with the pyrex lid that came with the dish, and the other with foil. Never the less, the crust mixed in nicely and the yellow bits were hardly noticeable.
I also made your scone with the left over heavy cream - delicious! And I might add, for my last batch, I ran out of the remaining cream, so decided to use milk instead.... this was a mistake. Those scones came out much harder and will have to be toasted or lathered up completely to combat the dryness.
Thanks again!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Leah, thanks so much for sharing your good experience with the recipe! I'm so glad it turned out well for you. Yep, the cream scones must be made with cream. If you just have milk, follow one of my other scone recipes. Isn't clotted cream just the best treat ever?!

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