17 November 2016

Fruitcake - Christmas Cake - Wedding Cake



Fruitcake - Christmas Cake - Traditional English Wedding Cake / www.delightfulrepast.com

Fruitcake is just called fruitcake all year round in the US, but in the UK at this time of year it's also called Christmas cake. If it's made on what is called Stir-Up Sunday (20 November this year), as some have the tradition, it has just over a month to mature (or ripen) before the holiday.

I'm posting my recipe now for those who observe that tradition, but I love fruitcake year round and am as likely to make it at the height of summer as now. And when I say fruitcake, I mean proper fruitcake, not those horrible shop-bought things that double as doorstops, filled with cheap sugary "fruits" that glow in the dark!

If you think you don't like fruitcake, you've probably never had a good one!

I go easy on the spices -- it's not a spice cake, after all -- and use a combination of organic dried fruits and nuts. It's quite a process (but not a lot of work really) -- soaking the fruits, making the cake, feeding it each week and then icing the cake in marzipan and royal icing; but I skip that last step. If I want to get fancy, I'll brush on some warm apricot jam and arrange sliced almonds or pecan halves over the top.

When I was a teenager, my mother and I (we developed the recipe together) would make huge batches of this in assorted sizes. Such fun! There is only one store-bought fruitcake (in the US anyway) that I like: the DeLuxe® Fruitcake from Collin Street Bakery in Corsicana, Texas. (And, no, they didn't pay me to say that; but if they wanted to send me a fruitcake, I wouldn't turn it down!)

It's a bit late now, but I can't think why I didn't have fruitcake as the top tier of our wedding cake. It was once the traditional wedding cake in the UK and a tradition I would have happily carried on.

Since fruitcake is so rich, it is cut into quite small pieces. And you may have noticed how difficult it can be to handle very thin wedges of cake. I've found the easiest way to serve the cake is to cut a 2-inch circle out of the middle and then cut 28 (about 28) 3/4-inch-thick (2 cm) slices from the ring.

I used the Ateco Stainless Steel 2x3-Inch Round Form to cut the 2-inch circle, then later thought, why not just put it in the middle of my pan and hold it steady as I put in the batter? You could turn any pan into a ring mould!

How about you? Are you a fruitcake fan? If not, I bet you would be if you made this one! Other winter traditions you might want to try: Eggnog and Mince Pies.


Fruitcake - Christmas Cake - Traditional English Wedding Cake / www.delightfulrepast.com
Don't forget to Pin it!

Fruitcake


(Makes one 7-inch/18cm cake)

The Fruit 


3/4 packed cup* (3.75 ounces/106 grams) dark raisins or currants
3/4 packed cup* (3.75 ounces/106 grams) sultanas (golden raisins) or diced dried papaya
3/4 packed cup* (3.75 ounces/106 grams) dried cherries or cranberries
3/4 packed cup* (3.75 ounces/106 grams) diced dried pineapple or apricots 

*OR 1 cup (5 ounces/142 grams) each of three dried fruits -- I used currants, cherries and pineapple for this one 

1/2 packed cup (3.75 ounces/106 grams) moist pitted prunes, diced 
1 medium organic or unsprayed and unwaxed orange for zest and juice (about 2 fluid ounces/59 ml)
1/2 medium organic or unsprayed and unwaxed lemon for zest and juice (about 1.5 fluid ounces/44 ml)
1/4 cup (2 fluid ounces/59 ml) brandy 

The Cake 


1 dip-and-sweep cup (5 ounces/142 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 firmly packed cup (1 ounce/28 grams) almond flour (finely ground almonds)

1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon mace or nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt 
2 cups (8 ounces/227 grams) coarsely chopped pecans
1/2 cup (4 ounces/ 113 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/3 packed cup (2.33 ounces/66 grams) dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 large eggs (large eggs US are medium eggs UK) 



Fruitcake - Christmas Cake - Traditional English Wedding Cake / www.delightfulrepast.com


1 About 12 to 24 hours before mixing cake, stir together fruit, zest, juice and brandy in a 1.5-quart bowl. Cover tightly and let stand for about 12 to 24 hours.

2 Prepare baking tin. Butter the inside of 7-inch/18cm springform pan (about 2.75 inches/7cm deep). Line the bottom with a circle of parchment paper; butter the parchment. Set the tin on a quarter sheet pan for baking.

Note: By way of experimenting, I also in one case wrapped the tin in a double layer of parchment that extends above the tin and tied it with string. The idea is to prevent over-cooking during the long bake, but I don't think it was necessary. Another idea I tried with one cake was to put a pan of hot water in the oven with the cake. Again, I don't know that it is at all necessary. I think putting the springform pan on a heavy-duty quarter sheet pan for baking is all you need to do. 

3 Preheat oven to 275F/135C/Gas1. In 1-quart bowl, whisk together flour, almond flour, ground spices and salt. Stir in chopped nuts. 

4 In bowl of stand mixer or in a 2-quart bowl with electric mixer or big spoon, cream together softened butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add vanilla extract and eggs, one at a time; mix well. 

5 By hand, stir in flour mixture, followed by the soaked fruits. This recipe makes about 5 cups of batter. Scrape batter into prepared baking tin, pack it in firmly and smooth the top. 

6 Bake on the baking sheet for 2 1/2 hours, then test. If toothpick inserted in center does not come out clean, check it every 10 minutes. I aim for 200 to 210F/93 to 99C on instant-read thermometer. 


Fruitcake - Christmas Cake - Traditional English Wedding Cake


7 When it is done, take the tin from the baking sheet and place it on a wire rack to cool for 20 minutes. Remove cake from the tin and continue cooling until it is completely cool. The cake is 2 inches high and weighs about 2 pounds 14 ounces (2.875 pounds/1.3 kg). 

8 When completely cool, use a toothpick or fine skewer to prick holes all over the top of the cake about an inch apart. Sprinkle 1 1/2 tablespoons of brandy evenly over the top of the cake. Wrap in parchment and foil; store at room temperature in tightly covered container. Take out and "feed" or "doctor" with 1 tablespoon of brandy once a week. Keep for at least 4 weeks before using to allow the flavour to develop.

93 comments:

Manu said...

I do love this tradition I didn't know!!
Your cake looks delicious1
Love

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Manu, thank you so much. Italy has many wonderful food traditions as well!

Pom Pom said...

Thank you so much, Jean! I think I can do it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Karen, I know you can! No worries! Let me know how it goes.

Angie Schneider said...

That's amazing, Jean. You did an excellent job creating this beautiful holiday cake.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie! The apricot glaze really perked up its appearance!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Umph…puh, puh. Paragraph 3…that’s my autobio in a sentence. Paragraph 4…you line out the single redeeming ingredient. I’ll take your word for it that I’ve never tasted a “good” fruitcake. And, of course, you do have a way of rescuing natural food from commercial glurp. But you are what you eat, and I already like chicken, ham and turkey. Don’t need fruitcake on my resume.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, I laughed when I published this post today, just imagining what you would have to say about the likes of fruitcake! :D Not surprised. If I weren't so lazy about trips to the post office and all things mail, I'd be sending you food all the time just so you could try the "good" version of all the things you hate! :-)

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

I agree with you about not liking fruit cake! If you don't like it, you haven't had a good one. Our recipes are very similar except for a few ingredients. It makes a scrumptious Christmas cake or wedding cake. Mine just happens to be nice served as a pudding too when heated up and a sauce poured over it. It replaces a plum pudding which a couple of my guys don't care for. So, I make this instead. Thanks for sharing your wonderful recipe.

Blessings,
Sandi

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sandi. And *we* are right, of course! :D Yes, I like it warmed as well, with a bit of cold custard sauce.

Pauline Wiles said...

My aunt, who lives in Somerset, got me started in the habit of eating cheddar cheese with fruitcake. Does anyone else do that?

Tony Grant said...

Thanks for reminding me Jean. I will start on our Christmas cake this coming weekend. I baked a chocolate cake last week for my youngest,Abigial's 16th Birthday. Its the best cake I've made so far. Well, I think so anyway Ha! Ha!
As for the above fruit cake, for one moment I thought you had baked a ,"toenail cake," and then looked closer!!!!! I like the glazed look.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pauline, I've never heard of eating cheddar cheese with fruitcake! I'm going to look into it. Thanks for the info.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, so glad your baking is coming along nicely! Eventually I will get to the Dundee cake (I refuse to call it by that other name!), but I just had to do this one first.

Candace Kage said...

Love how you gave us a little history lesson on fruit cake or otherwise known as Christmas Cake. That stir up Sunday is interesting. Thank you for linking up with Blogging Grandmothers link party.

Jeanie said...

Jean, it looks gorgeous! I've had good fruitcake before but never made one. This sounds pretty labor intensive but also quite delicious! We'll see how the schedule goes!

Sue Loncaric said...

I just love fruitcake and can remember helping my mother make our annual Christmas fruitcake. I still have her recipe. Yours looks delicious and has reminded me I need to get cracking on mine. Stopping by from Blogging Grandmothers Link up. x

Grammy said...

Am I a fruitcake fan you ask, no! We always have one in the house during Christmas and no one ever takes a bite of it. I don't know why we even make sure to have one available. The ones you buy in the store have nice ingredients but when you taste them there's just something that makes you not want another bite. Ok, I'll give in a try your recipe :) Thanks so much for joining in on our Blogging Grandmothers Link Party #3. We sure appreciate you partying with us! Looking forward to you joining us again next weekend!

Judith @ Lavender Cottage said...

I too call it Christmas cake and only make it once a year although I could eat fruitcake year round. I made small loaf pans of Dundee cake this week but prefer a darker cake so will likely go back to my old standby. My recipe has a jar of mincemeat in it (no suet) and it's quite moist.

Anonymous said...

Oh my, Jean, this sounds like a wonderful recipe for fruit cake. It looks so pretty! Enjoy yourself!

Oh, you should "stop by" our store now - the fall/winter cookies are being served with coffee at the front door. You know, we really should have a tea set up, too, huh.

Love,
Lily

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Candace, thank you. Glad you found it interesting!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, it sounds like a lot more work than it really is. Once you do it, you'll see what I mean!

Gingi Freeman said...

Wow, this looks absolutely delightful!! Thanks for sharing my dear! <3 - http://www.domesticgeekgirl.com

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sue, yes, it's time to "get cracking"! Thanks!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Grammy, I think you might be surprised. I'm so glad you're going to give it a go! Just had a small afternoon tea party this afternoon, and my guest of honor who does not normally like fruitcake actually liked this one! (And she is someone who would have told me if she didn't like it.)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Judith, I do like a moist fruitcake. I'm planning to make a Dundee cake soon. I like those too, but maybe not quite as much as this.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Dear Lily, thank you. I was just thinking about you yesterday! I would be in heaven there -- cookies and coffee (or, yes, tea!) and hardware all in the same place! Hugs!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Gingi, thanks so much!

PurpleSlob InRecovery said...

Jean, "feeding" the cake??
STir it up Sunday sounds like a fun day!
Nope, don't like fruitcake. But, when my Granny, and Grandma were alive, I did eat theirs, because it was real!
Blogging Grandmothers

Debbie Harris said...

"Glow in the dark fruit" too funny!
Your fruit cake looks amazing, Jean.
I have acquired a taste for fruit cake but it took some time.
While living in Canada I ate plenty of Christmas cake with my dear senior friends who ate it on a regular basis with their red rose tea steeped quite strong I might add. I was thankful for that cup of tea as it gave me something to wash the cake down with. Ha!
Now I enjoy it by itself and appreciate it's strong yet delicious flavor.
I will have to try your recipe sometime.
Thank you for sharing~~

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

PSIR, I'm with you and your Granny and Grandma -- it's gotta be real! :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Debbie, thank you. I love hearing everyone's thoughts on the ever-controversial fruitcake issue!

Marisa Franca @ Allourway said...

I am not a fruitcake fan but I've only had the really bad stuff! Nauseatingly sweet and just fruit that's gummy. I believe fruitcake has the reputation of being the gift that goes from person to person -- it knows no end :-) Now your fruitcake would NOT be passed on. Could you make this cake in an angel food pan? That way the hole would already be there. I'm pinning the recipe! I love the story behind it. Oh! I hope you get a little package from Texas.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marisa. I know what you mean: the ultimate "regifting" item! :D All I have to say is, if my husband (who never liked fruitcake) thinks a fruitcake is good, it must be; and he loves this one! No reason you couldn't make it in an angel food pan; it will just have slanted rather than straight sides.

Susan Elizabeth said...

Here in England Stir Up Sunday is a tradition in my household. But not for the cake - that is made the first Sunday in November. Stir Up is for the Christmas Pudding (plum pudding to you I think?) and not for this year but for next!!! This years puddings have been sitting maturing in a cool dark cupboard since last Stir Up Sunday! Anyone shocked by that? Back on topic. I agree that home made cake is nothing like shop bought and mine is eaten by everyone in the family who generally don't eat fruitcake. Some say I'm a fruitcake for making mine so early, especially the pudding. But no one declines a pudding as a gift for serving at Christmas dinner. Sadly my children and grandchildren are all boys and their wives are not interested in cooking so no one to carry on the tradition or recipes when I'm no longer around.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Susan, thank you for the info. I do love a good plum pudding as well. Such a shame you don't have a (grand) son or (grand) daughter-in-law interested in cooking, but don't despair. Make sure *they* understand that *their* future children or grandchildren might be very interested in old family recipes, so they better hang onto them! My sister had zero interest in cooking or family recipes/traditions; same with her daughter. But I'm fascinated with it. Feel free to email me (delightfulrepast at aol dot com) your Plum Pudding recipe.

Sippity Sup said...

I've always liked fruit cake, maybe I have been lucky enough to always come across versions as good as this. GREG

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Greg. And, really, if you don't feel like making one and no one gives you a nice homemade one, order the DeLuxe from Corsicana; it really is good!

Carol @Comfort Spring Station said...

My mother made fruitcake all during my childhood. Her cakes were so delicious; I miss that. A good fruitcake is unbelievable good. Yous is quite beautiful!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Carol, thank you. I don't get too fancy with the decorating! What a lovely memory of your mother. I miss mine, too!

Clearissa Coward said...

Oh my that brings back childhood memories. My grandmother used to make one every Christmas when all of her children and grandchildren showed up. She baked many cakes and pies but that fruitcake was the best and no one in the family has made it except her nor since her. Your cake looks a lot like my grandma's. Thank you for the recipe as well. My grandma's was in her head and when we lost her, we lost it. Thank you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Clearissa. I'm always glad to hear from someone about childhood food memories and grandma memories -- those are some of my very best memories!

Katrin said...

Mmh I love fruitcake but I have never tried making it actually, I always buy it! Now I really want to give this a go, I bet it's amazing!!!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Katrin! I hope you'll make it soon and let me know how it turned out for you. We had some with our tea this afternoon; it just keeps getting better and better.

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

I'm one of those people who love fruitcake and usually make one each year. I like the idea of using almond flour as one of the ingredients…something I've not done before.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Karen. Always happy to find another fruitcake fan! I love almond flour and think it makes a nice addition.

Linda @ Life and Linda said...

Our neighbor loves fruit cake. Christmas cake sounds lovely. Thanks for sharing the recipe. I hope your weekend is fabulous.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Linda! I hope you'll share the link to my recipe with your neighbor!

Melissa AuClair said...

This was so much fun to read through- goodness, it makes me want to make a fruitcake! I feel a bit intimidated, but I may try it.
Jean, my grandma buys a fruitcake each year and I think it's from the company you mentioned. She loves it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Melissa, thank you! But do make it, don't be intimidated! Since I give every little detail, it may sound more complicated than it is. But if you want to just buy a fruitcake, definitely go for the DeLuxe from Corsicana. I first had it when I was very young because a relative sent it to us (and everyone she knew) every year. It was sooo good!

Marilyn Lesniak said...

This one looks a lot like my mother-in-laws recipe. I need to get that out for Christmas. Thanks for sharing at #ThursdayFavoriteThings.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marilyn, thank you for hosting. See you next time!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

Both Mark and I and big fans of good fruitcake. There are so many good recipes blalnced by all the bad ones, right Jean? Yours looks lovely and - oh my - here it is Stir-Up Sunday and I don't have half the ingredients... but I do have a pain d'├ępices in the oven! Happy Thanksgiving To You!!

Ali said...

This is a beautiful version! I made my first fruitcake last year but made it too boozy - it was great, but really strong on the brandy. Yours uses a more reasonable amount of brandy than the recipe I used, so will be doing this one this year instead - especially since I plan to send a small cake to my mother! :)

Nazneen Hamilton said...

A good fruit cake is amazing! I'm from the UK and I crave fruitcake at this time of the year.
I end up getting some from World Market.
Your cake looks wonderful!
How funny is it that I know the bakery you are talking about in Corsicana?
I always thought about stopping but we never have! I'm going to Texas this Dec, I wlll be stopping!

Nazneen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, you and Mark have good taste! There are so many good foods to eat, sometimes I make something and love it but never make it again, just because there are so many things to make!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ali, thank you. And do let me know how it turns out for you. I think brandy is THE best alcohol to use and, as you mentioned, not too much of it!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Nazneen, how fun! I'd love to go to the bakery. Then if you like the cake as much as we do, you can get it through the mail any time of year! Happy travels!

Kathleen Aherne said...

Jean that is a true Christmas Fruit Cake - awesome. When I was living in the US - my friends did not know anything about a real fruit cake. Like you say if someone does not like it, then they have not tasted a good one like this recipe you are sharing.

Kathleen
Bloggers Pit Stop

All That I'm Eating said...

Such a delicious cake; I've never made one myself you know! I think I should!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kathleen, thank you! I thought you would know "real" fruitcake when you saw it! Some people put fruit in a cake, usually a Bundt cake, and call it fruitcake; but it's not. It might be a delicious cake with fruit in it, but it's not "fruitcake!"

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Caroline, when you do make one, I hope it will be this one! And do let me know how it turned out and how much fun you had with it!

Bernideen said...

Dear Jean:
I will definitely copy and save your recipe in my Fruitcake File. I made some little ones last year and we loved what we had (gave others away). Thanks for sharing and linking your recipe.

Miz Helen said...

Thanks so much for linking up with Full Plate Thursday! We will have an early Thanksgiving Edition on 11-22 -16, hope to see you there!
Wishing you a bountiful Thanksgiving!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Bernideen! Doesn't fruitcake go beautifully with tea?!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Miz Helen! And for telling me about the day change.

3 Little Buttons said...

When I see a list of ingredients that long, I always think there is no way I could do that. It looks great though. Thank you for sharing with the #DreamTeam.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, 3LB! I know it's a long list of ingredients, but you can do it! I know you can!

Frugal in Derbyshire said...

Good recipe!I like your addition of dates. When I make ours I make a huge mix and bake several small cakes for elderly friends and relatives too, who really appreciate it (young people less so)
Just came across your lovely blog I was blogging about and don't remember how I got here, but glad I did.
3 little buttons... yes it is a lot of ingredients but preparing them and getting the family to help and stir and make a wish and think of Christmas is all part of the process!
Gill in the UK

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Gill! I'm having a small slice of it right this minute! It would be lovely if we all had someone in our family in each generation who was interested in keeping the food traditions alive, but ... Oh well ... we're doing our bit!

Tony Grant said...

Jean, I have made our Christmas cake.I followed your recipe as much as I could. I used some mixed fruit along the way.Most of YOUR ingredients are in it!! I have started ,"feeding," it with rum.A friend gave me a bottle of rum as a present two years ago. It added a nice flavour to my last years cake so I am using it again. My cake tin is not spring form but it has a non stick surface and a push up bottom. I greased it with butter. I have discovered, through various cake baking exploits, I don't need to line the bottom with paper. All the best, Tony

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, that's wonderful! I've made two. One we've been eating, and one I'm going to put in the refrigerator or freezer once I'm through feeding it with brandy and "maturing" it. I'd actually rather use a push-up pan like yours, but I just have the springforms.

Julie said...

What a beautiful cake. I grew up eating fruit cake and don't understand why so many think they don't like it. Very interesting that this cake was a wedding cake. I love food history!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Julie, thank you! And I love food history, too!

Candace Kage said...

Reminds me of visiting my grandmother home in Indiana. All the aunts use to gather to have a baking day. Seems like we always at one whole fruitcake before the day was over. Thanks for linking up with Blogging Grandmothers party.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Candace. What a lovely memory! I was in the kitchen a lot with my mother and grandmothers, but not my aunts as well -- that would have been wonderful!

Margie said...

Your description of store-bought fruitcake is too funny! I confess that I'm not usually a fan of fruitcake, but your post has persuaded me to give it another try...Happy Thanksgiving, Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Margie! I'm glad you appreciated my fruitcake humor! If you try it, you'll find it goes down a treat with a nice cuppa tea!

Grammy said...

Looks yummy, definitely going to try it! Thank you for partying with us at #BloggingGrandmothers #LinkParty #4. We've shared your post on Pinterest, Facebook, and Twitter.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Grammy, thank you so much! I so appreciate those social media shares!

Daniela said...

I didn't know this tradition, darling Jean, and I'm sincerely grateful to you for I do learn everything which is new to me with such a joy !

As for the recipe you share today and the cake you suggest us, well, it's simply gorgeous, you're truly an artist, sweet friend of mine !

Hope you're having the best of weeks,
I'm sending blessings of joy on your Thanksgiving Day ahead,
with utmost thankfulness

Xx Dany

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, dear Dany. Yes, it's easy to see from your beautiful blog that you enjoy learning new things. I always learn something new from your posts about historical things.

April J Harris said...

Your Christmas Cake looks lovely, Jean. Your recipe sounds really delicious. I love that you have used so many tasty dried fruits. Many UK recipes just stick to raisins, sultanas and currants - and I really like to add other dried fruit as well. Our whole wedding cake was fruit cake - all 4 layers - and we saved the top layer for the Christening of our first child (another UK tradition). It kept, well wrapped, for two years. Then we returned the top layer to the original baker who stripped the icing and re-iced it with a cute little bear decoration. It actually tasted quite nice - even after all that time! Thank you for sharing your wonderful recipe with us at Hearth and Soul.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you. And thank you for sharing your fruitcake story! I love that you had all four tiers of fruitcake for your wedding; I should have had at least the top tier fruitcake.

handmade by amalia said...

Your cake looks yummy and very festive indeed. A proper fruit cake.
Amalia
xo

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amalia! Be sure to enter the giveaway I just posted if you have someone in the US to mail it to.

Alana - Burnished Chaos said...

I love fruitcake and would happily eat it all year round. I've never had much success with making it (although I do make pretty amazing mince pies) and it always comes out too heavy or dry, I'll have to give this recipe a go and see how I get on x
#DreamTeam

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Alana, I do hope you will give it a try. We have one cake we've been gradually eating over a couple of weeks, and it's delightfully moist and wonderful. And I have a whole cake in a tin that I'm going to feed and mature for another 2 weeks before popping it into the refrigerator or freezer for a later date.

Nikki Frank-Hamilton said...

Jean, I have obviously never had a proper fruit cake! All I remember is the door stop kind from childhood. This recipe sounds delish. I love dried fruits and nuts, and really like that you can add any kind you prefer to the cake. I am pinning to try this, it would make a wonderful Christmas gift for friends and family. Thanks and happy holidays!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Nikki, I'm so happy my recipe appeals to you despite your early exposure to bad fruitcakes! You'll want to make them quite soon because they need time to "mature."

Michele @ The Nest at Finch Rest said...

Jean - your tea time hints and inspiration is perfect - thank you!

Also, thanks so much for your fruitcake recipe - I have never made it - I think perhaps this season is the time I do so!

TYSM for the 3 tier giveaway opportunity! How exciting!
Count me in for sure! Thanks!

As always, thanks so much for your visit and sweet comments. Hugs. ♥

Margo said...

I just may have to try this next Christmas. Thanks for letting me know about your recipe - fruitcake fascinates me because I love long traditions. (Also love the idea of stir-it-up Sunday - we don't have anything like that in the US).

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Margo, happy to share! We are of like minds -- fascinated by foods with long traditions!

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