28 February 2019

Yorkshire Curd Tart

Yorkshire Curd Tart - A British Historical Recipe / www.delightfulrepast.com

Yorkshire Curd Tart is hundreds of years old but only came to my attention in January when I posted Richmond Maids of Honour. Around since the early to middle 17th century, it’s something very likely to have been made by my Yorkshire great grandmother, so I just had to make it.

Not a custard tart, it’s more like a shallow cheesecake. With sweet spices and dried currants, it’s a bit out of the ordinary and goes beautifully with a nice cuppa tea. Some insist only nutmeg or only allspice should be used, so I used a little of each.


Yorkshire Curd Tart - A British Historical Recipe / www.delightfulrepast.com


I came up with my recipe for the filling by adapting from several sources, especially Foods of England and British Food: A History, and used my own favorite tart pastry. And I like to completely prebake the pastry before filling to ensure the crust will stay crisp, “no soggy bottoms.”

I love historical recipes, especially the regional recipes of Britain. Even ones I don't care to make or eat are fun to read. Is that your idea of fun?! 😀 I blame my mother!

Yorkshire Curd Tart - A British Historical Recipe / www.delightfulrepast.com

Yorkshire Curd Tart


(Makes one 9-inch/23cm tart, 8 servings) 


The Pastry - Pâte Sucrée (a sweet shortcrust pastry) 

1 1/4 dip-and-sweep cup (6.25 ounces/177 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 packed cup (1 ounce/28 grams) unsifted powdered sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons (4 ounces/113 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1 large egg 


The Filling 


6 tablespoons (3 ounces/85 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/3 cup (2.33 ounces/66 grams) sugar
8 ounces (227 grams) curd cheese or Neufchatel cheese (also called 1/3 less fat cream cheese), room temperature
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
2 large eggs, beaten
1/3 cup (2.67 fluid ounces/79 ml) milk
1 teaspoon rosewater, optional (I used 1/8 teaspoon almond extract)
1/2 packed cup (2.5 ounces/71 grams) dried currants
1 teaspoon unbleached all-purpose flour

1 Add flour, powdered sugar and salt to work bowl of food processor; turn on for about 3 or 4 seconds to combine. Add chunks of butter; pulse to a crumb texture. Add egg; pulse until the dough starts clumping together. This is to be a crisp, more cookie-like crust, rather than a flaky pastry; so there's not quite the concern about over-processing. Flatten slightly into a 4- to 6-inch round disc, wrap and refrigerate for 30 to 60 minutes. 

2 Lightly butter a 9-inch/23cm tart tin (1-inch deep) and set it on a baking sheet. On lightly floured 12-inch square of aluminum foil, roll out the pastry to a 12-inch circle about 1/8-inch (3 mm) thick. Transfer dough to tart tin, pressing dough (but not stretching it) to fit the tin. Save the foil; you're not done with it. With scissors or knife, trim the overhang to 1/2 inch or so all around. Fold it in and press it to the sides to form a thicker side crust. Trim the edges* by rolling the rolling pin over the top. Press the pastry into the flutes so that it rises a bit above the edge (in case of shrinkage). Pop it in the freezer for 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 375F/190C/Gas5.

* Don't throw away the scraps; they make wonderful cookies (maybe 2 or 3 of them). Just press them out and throw them on the baking sheet next to the tart tin. Save a small piece of raw dough in case your crust needs patching.

3 Cover chilled pastry with reserved piece of foil, clean side up, pressing it to fit well. Spread 2 cups of ceramic pie weights (that's two packages of Mrs. Anderson's ceramic pie weights), also called ceramic baking beans in the UK, over the foil. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove foil and weights; continue baking for 10 minutes, until lightly browned to a pale golden. Let stand to cool completely, about 30 minutes.

4 Toward end of pastry cooling time, preheat oven to 325F/165C/Gas3 and make the filling. In small mixing bowl (I use a 1-quart glass measure), cream well the softened butter and sugar. Mix in the cheese, salt and spices. Beat in the eggs, milk and rosewater or almond extract (if using) until thoroughly combined. In small bowl, mix the currants and flour, making sure all the currants are separated and coated, and stir them into the filling, reserving a tablespoon of them to sprinkle on top of the filling, if you like. I didn’t do it, but I might next time. I think a few floating on top would look nice. 

5 Pour the filling into the cooled prebaked pastry shell. Put on a pie crust shield to prevent the edge of the crust from over-browning. Bake (with tart tin on baking sheet) for about 25 to 30 minutes, until just set and still with a bit of a wobble in the center. Cool to room temperature, about 1 hour. Remove from tin. Serve at room temperature or chilled. Dust with sifted powdered sugar just before serving.


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Jean

62 comments:

Angie Schneider said...

Looks fantastic! I guess a curd cheese is very much like thick yoghurt?

Tony Grant said...

Ey up lass. Ee ba gum this looks reet good.

A bit of Yorkshire dialect for those who think I have gone mad!!
Yes....debatable. Lets move on.

And as for being hundreds of years old, I don't notice any mouldy bits. Its lasted well, Jean.

OK to be serious. It looks great. I would love a slice at this very moment along with a nice cup of Yorkshire tea.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. Hadn't thought of it, but a thick, well-drained full-fat yogurt might work nicely.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, thank you. Love that Yorkshire dialect! And don't forget to wear your flat cap while you're having your Yorkshire curd tart and Yorkshire tea!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Re: “…Yorkshire Curd Tart is hundreds of years old…” Yeah, I’ve had that happen to me when the light bulb in the ‘fridge went out. When I finally replaced it, there was that pesky tart hiding right there behind the thousand-year-old egg I brought home from LeeAnn Chin’s.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, thank you for my first laugh of the day! I've never been able to bring myself to eat one of those hundred-year or thousand-year preserved eggs, even though they're really just a few weeks or a few months old.

ellen b. said...

It looks very good! I've seen that cheese in the stores.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Ellen. I have such fun researching historic foods!

Louca por porcelana said...

Looks YUMMY!I also love your gorgeous dish and silver!Hugs,Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Maristella! We love our dishes and silver, don't we!

Jeanie said...

This looks really delicious, jean, and not too hard. And it's English so of course I will love it. Thanks. Might give this one a try.

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

Love hearing about this tart, Jean. Reading about old recipes is so interesting to me as well. The measurements can get a little tricky, though. ♥

April J Harris said...

Definitely my idea of fun, Jean! I love learning about, researching and making vintage and historic recipes. I had never heard of Yorkshire Curd Tart, but I think it looks wonderful. I hope to give it a try when we get back home! Pinning and sharing. Thank you so much for all your support of the Hearth and Soul Link Party!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Wish I could share a slice of your tart, Jean. I love both allspice and nutmeg, and I'm sure they added a nice warmth spiciness to the recipe. I'll have to try your recipe soon. Thank you for sharing!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thanks. Of course, if I were you, I'd just let the Mister do all the cooking! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Martha. Yes, it's so fun, isn't it? I've gotten pretty good at sorting out the measurements in the old recipes. Some of them are for huge amounts, calling for a dozen eggs, 3 pints of milk, 2 pounds of flour, so they have to be cut down to a normal family size dish!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you so much. (Or should I say, Maholo nui loa?)

Vee said...

It sounds delicious. I like your step of prebaking the crust to avoid a soggy bottom, too.

Lowcarb team member said...

Looks absolutely delicious …

All the best Jan

Stephanie said...

Oh, this looks and sounds delicious, Jean! My dear Grandma Betty from Canada used to always make Yorkshire pudding during the holidays and oh, it was a tasty addition to the meal :)

Thanks for sharing the recipe for this tart. Hugs to you!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Vee. Yes, there's nothing more disappointing than a soggy bottom!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jan, thank you. And just a small sliver satisfies. I don't like to overdo on sugar and starch.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Stephanie. I love Yorkshire pudding! And it always makes me think of my English grandmother.

Lauren @ My Wonderfully Made said...

Looks lovely - I love recipes that are so old and full of history.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lauren, thank you. Glad that you, too, know how to have fun! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, I'd love to give you a slice of tart and a cup of tea any time!

Marilyn Miller said...

This sounds absolutely delicious~ I would love this one.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marilyn. It's very good with tea!

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

What a wonderful recipe, I am glad you are preserving some food history. It looks like a great cake.

Marisa Franca @ Allourway said...

I love finding a recipe with a history. So much fun to make and to write about. This certainly sounds like a wonderful dessert to try. Your crust looks perfect -- flaky and light. I haven't made to many English desserts and this one is going to be the next. Have a great weekend.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Gerlinde. I've always been fascinated by food history.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marisa, thank you. For me, the crust is always the most important part of a pie or tart--I could be happy just eating crust!

Pauline Wiles said...

There's something about the sound of the word "curd" I've never particularly liked, but I'm pretty sure I would really enjoy this tart! Love that it has fruity bits in it too.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pauline, I know what you mean! I think it's because of the word "curdled," which paints such an unappetizing picture.

Marisa G Thermofan said...

Hi, Jean. I didn't know this tart and I love it. Delicious filling.
Have a great weekend.
Regards from Valencia.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Marisa! I just made some more tart pastry and popped it in the fridge, though I'm not making a tart today.

Phil in the Kitchen said...

That looks just great. This is one of my favourite desserts (although I admit that it's a long list of favourites). So many traditional British foods seem to have disappeared but it's still possible to find this one in restaurants and bakeries (at least now and then). One version I came across had a hint of rum (I admit that's not to everyone's taste) but I've yet to manage to get the flavour of that quite right. Which reminds me, speaking of traditional English recipes and rum, I haven't eaten a Cumberland Rum Nicky for many years. Your traditional recipes are making me very nostalgic.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Phil. And now I'm intrigued -- a Cumberland Rum Nicky sounds like something my family in Cumberland must have enjoyed. I'll be looking into it! I like a hint of rum or, more often, brandy in baked goods.

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

This tart sounds like one I know we would like. What is nice is that I usually have most of the ingredients...just need the cheese for this one.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Karen. This is such a different tart, I'm hoping some readers will make it and let me know their thoughts.

Margie said...

Looks great, Jean.

There's a tearoom on my bucket list that serves food from historic recipes. I hope I finally get a chance to visit it this year.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Margie, that's wonderful. Hope to see it on your blog soon!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

Make - not a dessert fan - listened carefully when I told him about this and listed the ingredients. He actually said he looks forward to having this for dessert, and imagines it a wonderful “Christmas pudding!”

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, David. I hope you and Mark enjoy it! Do let me know.

Kippi O'Hern said...

Yum, I just pinned this yummy recipe! Have a great week, Kippi #kippiathome

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Kippi!

Caz Taylor said...

Lovely sounding tart and yes as you say it is reminiscent of a cheesecake filling would be nice to add some berries instead of dried fruit :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Caz, thank you. And, yes, it would be lovely to use berries instead of dried fruit, but I was being "authentic" this time around! :-) Love berries.

Kitchen Riffs said...

This looks excellent! And a bit different. Old recipes are fun, aren't they? This looks like something we'd definitely enjoy -- thanks.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. Yes, I have such fun with old recipes!

Beatrice Euphemie said...

Sounds very delicious. I love custard pie, but not the richness of cheesecake, so this looks like a nice hybrid. The nutmeg is a nice ingredient. I'll try this one! Thank you for the vintage recipe. x Karen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Karen! I like the way you put that - a nice hybrid! Hope you're staying cozy!

Clearissa Coward said...

This is decadent. Looks so yummy. Thank you for sharing with #TheBloggingGrandmotherLinkParty.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Clearissa!

John rieber said...

A terrific looking dish, and thanks for sharing the recipe!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. Historical recipes are such fun.

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Yum! I haven't made these often because my hubby never used to like them but now he does. He will even eat quiche now. So, guess what I have on my list of goodies to bake within the next month?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sandi, that's great. It's funny how our tastes can change. Let me know how it turns out for you.

Regine Karpel said...

❤️

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, RK!

Whiskers & Paws said...

This looks wonderful. Great pictures too!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Whiskers & Paws!

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