28 March 2019

Steamed Jam Sponge Pudding - A British Classic

Steamed Jam Sponge Pudding - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

For some reason, it’s been a few years since I last made a steamed pudding. But it was one of the first things I thought of when I unboxed my Instant Pot in December. But you don't need one of those to steam a pudding.

Steamed Jam Sponge Pudding - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

Steam on Stovetop, in Slow Cooker or in Instant Pot

You can steam this in a slow cooker, using the directions given in my Steamed Pumpkin Pudding post, or on the stovetop, using the directions below. For those with an Instant Pot …

… I’ve gone into great detail with the directions, in case you’re new to steaming puddings in the pressure cooker. So it might look a bit complicated, but it really isn’t. And the total cooking time is just an hour! 

It seems the texture is improved by first pre-steaming without pressure, which makes this a two-stage process—which kind of bugs me, but if that’s what it takes for the best result, well …


Steamed Jam Sponge Pudding - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com
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Steamed Jam Sponge Pudding


(Makes one 6-cup/1.4-litre pudding, 10 servings)

1/2 cup raspberry or strawberry jam
1 1/2 dip-and-sweep cups (7.5 ounces/213 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
14 tablespoons (7 ounces/198 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature and very soft
1 cup (7 ounces/198 grams) sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3 large eggs, room temperature, beaten

1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces/118 ml) milk, room temperature

1 Butter well the inside of a 3-inch-deep 6-inch round cake tin (or other 6-cup/1.4-litre pudding mould that will fit in the Instant Pot, slow cooker or stovetop pot). Put a round of parchment paper in the tin and butter it as well. Spread the jam evenly in the bottom of the tin; place the tin in the freezer while you proceed. This will make it easier to spread the thick batter in the tin without disturbing the layer of jam. 


2 In 1.5-quart bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Whisking vigorously for about 60 seconds “sifts” the dry ingredients.



3 In 2.5-quart bowl, with electric mixer (electric hand whisk), cream butter. Add sugar and vanilla, and continue creaming until light and fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes. While beating, slowly drizzle in beaten eggs, adding about a tablespoon or two of flour to smooth out the mixture. Continue beating until light and fluffy. With large metal spoon, fold in the flour mixture. Stir in the milk. Batter should be rather thick, of a consistency to drop from the spoon.

4 Scrape the batter into the prepared cake tin/pudding mould and cover tightly with foil. Tie a piece of kitchen string tightly below the rim of the tin. (I don't bother to make a "pleat" in the foil because I've formulated the batter to be precisely the right amount to fill the tin to about 1.5 centimeters from the top and to rise to meet the tight foil lid and go no farther. Besides, I don't really think that pleat business works!

Note: If your Instant Pot rack doesn't have handles, or if you are steaming your pudding on the stovetop, you can make a handle with kitchen string to make it easy to put in and take out of the pot.

Note: If using the Instant Pot, skip right to step 5 and carry on. If steaming your pudding stovetop: In a saucepan or stockpot wide enough and deep enough for your pudding mould, place a wire rack or folded tea towel to lift the mould off the bottom of the pan. Place the pudding on the rack and pour in enough hot water to come halfway up the side of the mould. Over medium heat, bring the water to a boil. Cover the pan with a tight-fitting lid, reduce the heat to a gentle simmer, and let steam for about 2 hours, checking the water level every 30 minutes to make sure it doesn't boil dry. Skip to number 9. 

5 Place rack (with its handles up) in bottom of the Instant Pot cooking pot, and add 2 cups of boiling water to the pot. Center the pudding on the rack.

6 Put on the optional Instant Pot glass lid. Plug in the Instant Pot. Press the Saute key to select that program. Press the Saute key as many times as it takes to change the temperature indicator to Less. Press the Plus or Minus key to change the cooking time to 20 minutes to pre-steam the pudding before pressure cooking.

Note: You need to start with hot water because the Instant Pot set on the Saute function starts counting down the minutes right away (and does not display the minutes, just the word “Hot,” so I set a kitchen timer just to be sure!). 

7 When the beep sounds, it turns Off. Remove the optional Instant Pot glass lid and put the pressure cooking lid in place. Turn the steam valve to Sealing. Press the Pressure Cook key. Leave the indicator on High Pressure and change the cooking time to 35 minutes.

Note: Since it is already hot, it only takes about 4 minutes to come up to pressure.

8 When the beep sounds, turn it off by pressing Cancel. Allow the pressure to release naturally for 20 minutes, then do a quick release by turning the steam valve to Venting. Then leave the lid in place for another 10 minutes.

9 Carefully remove the lid. Using potholders or oven gloves and the handles on the rack, carefully lift out the pudding. Remove the foil. The pudding should be slightly pulling away from the edges of the pan.

10 Carefully run a knife around the edge of the pudding. Invert it onto a serving plate. Serve warm with hot or cold Custard Sauce or with whipped cream.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

80 comments:

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

Excellent details on how to prepare the jam sponge pudding. As far as I know, I've never had a steamed pudding. I do know that they are popular though on the "other side of the pond".

roughterrain crane said...

This yellow is very beautiful. It is shining.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Karen. I hope you'll try it! Thanks to my mother and her mother, I grew up with the British classics.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Roughterraincrane, thank you. That yellow is all natural, from the eggs.

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

I volunteer to prepare the jam part. But you’d better have a backup for that just in case – you know – someone steals it or something before it can make it to the cake…

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Okay, Sully, you're on for the jam! Funny, when I make raspberry jam, I feel compelled to make it seedless; but when I buy it, I often buy the kind with seeds and like it just fine that way.

Vee said...

Such a unique dessert...I remember enjoying one long ago when I was a child. It is unlikely that I’ll have an opportunity to try it again. It’s not something I would make for myself. Thanks for sharing this as I would have forgotten that long-ago moment.

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Oh. My. Goodness! Does your pudding ever look good, Jean. The only cake {pudding} I have ever made with raspberry jam on top is chocolate. I buy the frozen raspberries and make a sauce and it is so good. Your pudding is a beautiful colour too. It almost looks like lemon it is so golden from the eggs. I would love some with a hot cup of tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Vee, thank you so much. I love food memories, my own and other's. I think there aren't that many of us in the US who have a childhood memory of a steamed jam sponge pudding! :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sandi. Yes, let's have a hot cup of tea and some warm steamed pudding! I love it with lemon, too.

Maristela Guilherme said...

Parece delicioso!
Pudim remete memórias da casa de vó.
bjs

saints1A said...

Very nice Jean. My mum used to make steamed jam sponge pudding for my brothers and myself.
Perhaps you could try ,”jam rolly poly,” next. Yes it is a real pudding, going back to the 16th century . A famous English classic pudding. Some lovely runny custard to go on top too.
I am impressed with your exploration of English cooking Jean. Keep it up. All the very best, Tony

saints1A said...

Just checked. Probably Jam Rolly Polys were first made in the 19th century. I doubt Queen Victoria would have eaten it. A working class dish.

Angie Schneider said...

What a beautiful steamed cake! The jam makes it even more tempting :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Maristela, thank you so much!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Tony. My English grandmother and mother got me started on English cookery early in life, and I'm keeping the tradition alive.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Angie, thank you. Goes so well with tea. Might be just the thing for one of your workplace tea socials!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

I haven't eaten a steamed jam pudding for many years. It does look really good and makes me nostalgic for the fine puddings that were around when I was young. Although, I do remember some truly terrible steamed puddings dished up at school. They put me off the whole idea of steamed puddings for some years until I realised that they didn't have to be like that.

Margie said...

This is the first time I've seen steamed jam pudding. Looks like it would make a tasty tea time treat.

Re: Oreos, the cookies are my favourite part too.

I have a terrible habit of eating at my desk so the pop-up teas encourage me to take a proper lunch break...and it helps me use up some of my tea stash.

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

This beautiful pudding is a lovely! Your baking expertise always amazes me, Jean. Thank you for sharing it with us all.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Phil, thank you. I have some horrifying memories of school food! In 4th grade we moved, and the new school's food was not as high quality as my old school. I remember being shocked nearly to tears at lunchtime on my first day. I can still see and smell the horrible beef stew that more closely resembled canned dog food than any stew I'd ever eaten. It was served with canned spinach and a half sandwich of peanut butter and honey. Is that not an odd combination of foods?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Margie, probably a lot of people don't know steamed puddings. I am keeping alive British food traditions that are probably dying out there as well. I do hope you'll turn over a new leaf and get into the habit of taking a proper lunch break!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Martha! I do love it and love experimenting. If Christopher Kimball hadn't come up with America's Test Kitchen, I should have! Of course, my mother was the queen of all that and I miss her most when I'm up to my elbows in flour and think how much fun we had cooking up a storm together.

Pauline Wiles said...

Jean, your photos are always lovely, but this time I can almost taste that pudding. You're taking me back to my university days, too. I'm off to check out your slow-cooker pumpkin version...

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pauline, thank you so much. I love evoking good memories with food. I especially like the pumpkin pudding in autumn.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Thank you so much for such detailed instructions, Jean, in using the Instant Pot. I'd love to try this recipe, and I like that it makes a small cake. You're the best!

Healthwealthbridge by Dr. Amrita Basu Misra said...

This is a very useful steamed pudding recipe.Bookmarked this to make later .Visiting from the pitstop

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, thanks so much! I cut it into 10 slices and froze 6 of them in glass storage containers.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amrita. I hope you can try it soon.

Debbie-Dabble Blog and A Debbie-Dabble Christmas said...

Jean,
Thanks so much for stopping by and for taking the time to comment on my post about Blogging!! I think we all need to be true to ourselves even those that choose to advertise or they will lose readers!!
By the way, this looks so yummy!!
Hugs,
Deb

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Deb. I love sharing my recipes with all of you.

Mary said...

Hi, it’s my first time visiting your lovely blog, you mention making puddings in your oven, could you tell me how that is done, please? I don’t have a rack for my slow cooker, or an instapot. This recipe sounds delightful.

Anna of Stuffedveggies said...

I've long wished to try making a steamed pudding - but have never gotten up the courage! Thanks so much for stopping by to visit my blog. I hope we'll see more of each other in the future. (I've subscribed to your RSS - which should help : )

Veronica Lee said...

Yummm! The pudding looks amazing! Pinning this!

Have a great weekend, Jean!

Louca por porcelana said...

It is mouthwatering...Hugs,dear Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Veronica. Think I'll get another couple of slices out of the freezer for this evening.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Maristela! The plate is one my aunt brought me from England years ago.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mary, thank you. AND for your question. It's been a long time since I did this particular type of steamed pudding in the oven, so you will need to experiment with the time. But here's what you do: Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. Put a damp kitchen towel in the bottom of a roasting pan (3 inches deep, but at least 2 inches deep if your pudding mould is 3 inches deep), place pudding mould on towel, fill roasting pan with boiling water to reach halfway up the sides of the pudding mould, steam for 1 to 2 hours, checking water level every half hour and topping it up as needed, and checking the pudding for doneness at 1 hour.

Jeanie said...

I'm impressed with your conversion details. If I do this one, it'll be on the stovetop. It looks beautiful and sounds delicious and I love your presentation. It would be quite a showstopper!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Anna, thanks so much. Once you make one, you'll see how easy it really is!

Amy Johnson said...

Oh my gosh! This looks amazing! TFS!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thank you so much. I hope you will try it and let me know how it worked out for you. You can use any sort of jam or marmalade, but I love the look of the red raspberry jam.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amy. (I'm afraid I don't know what "TFS" means!)

Cocoa and Lavender said...

Jean, with your expert instructions, I think I am ready to make my very first steamed pudding! I am excited to try this.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, that makes me so happy! Do let me know how it turns out for you!

Carol @Comfort Spring Station said...

I've never had steamed pudding though I've heard it's wonderful. You make it sound doable - do I dare?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, Carol, definitely "do dare!" And let me know how it turns out for you.

Fran @ Gday Souffle said...

Jean, this pudding looks lovely! Sometimes I steam dumplings in my wok using a steamer basket, so I could make your pudding using my wok and wire rack. I wonder what the difference would be if I just baked the pudding in the oven-maybe not as moist?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Fran. I love doing them in the oven as well. Just don't cover it and put your pudding tin/dish in a deep pan with boiling water halfway up the sides of the pudding mould. Should come out nice and moist. But I'm intrigued by the clever idea of using the wok!

Michele@liferedesign101.com said...

What a pretty, springy dessert. I don't believe I have ever had a steamed pudding before. I picture it as something they would eat at Downton Abbey!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Michele, thank you. And I love that -- something they'd eat at Downton Abbey! :-)

Lavender and Lime (http://tandysinclair.com) said...

I think this winter I shall have to bite the bullet so to say and try and make this! It looks so good :)

Ann Fraser said...

I remember having this for school dinners 6o years ago in England. I have only ever cooked it in the oven.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tandy, thanks so much. Would go well with an espresso!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Ann, thank you for sharing that memory with me! I like the oven method, too, but am thinking I'll prefer the Instant Pot when hot weather hits.

Pam Richardson said...

Jean, this looks so delicious and I can just imagine a slice with afternoon tea. Thanks for sharing!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Pam. Yes, I do love it with a nice cup of tea in the afternoon. And it's small enough to look cute on the afternoon tea table (and I know you know how important that is!).

Marilyn Miller said...

Yumm! That looks so good.

Mother of 3 said...

I've never heard of this; but it look delicious! Thanks so much for sharing with us at the Welcome Spring party.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marilyn. Perfect with tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Mother of 3. I'm sure you're not alone--lots of people in the US have probably never heard of it.

Kitchen Riffs said...

Fun dish! I sometimes see a steamed pudding in restaurants, but very occasionally (well, except when I'm visiting England -- I've seen them often there, but you knew that already!). And not something I ever make. Neat recipe -- thanks.

Mae said...

This recipe looks very delicious and mouthwatering. Gonna try to make some this Easter I'm pretty sure that my family would love this.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. Who knows, maybe I'm the only person in the US who is into steamed puddings! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Mae. I like it for just about any occasion!

Marilyn @ MountainTopSpice said...

This recipe sounds absolutely easy and delicious! I have never had a steamed pudding, but my, it looks soo good, and how nice to have the jam already layered on the cake when it is done cooking too! I have not made a dessert in my IP yet, but I am eager to try. You share such excellent tips, which I appreciate! Blessings to you :)

Mrs. Chrissy T said...

Looks great and interesting . I must plan to try.

Ron said...

Jean, I have fond memories of eating steamed jam sponge pudding when I used to visit The Midlands. Surely my kind of dessert. I've never made one, but then I'm not a sweets baker. I'm thinking I might be able to handle this one. Thanks for sharing.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marilyn, thank you so much. I really appreciate your thoughtful comments.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Chrissy, I hope you will try it soon and let me know how it turned out for you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Ron. I do hope you will try this one. And thank you for sharing your pudding memories.

Mrs. Sarah Coller said...

Fantastic! This looks great---thank you! I appreciate you linking up at the Homemaking Party!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sarah. It would be a perfect dessert for your large family--no leftovers.

Christie Hawkes said...

Thanks, Jean, for sharing another great recipe on #BloggingGrandmothersLinkParty! I'm sharing on social media.

Lowcarb team member said...

Steamed pudding, a favourite of many especially in cooler days.

All the best Jan

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jan!

Bernideen said...

This looks very yummy Jean!!!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Bernideen. And it looks really nice on the tea table, especially with Old Country Roses! :-)

Thisiswhereitisat said...


I want to lick the screen as this to me is my comfort food X

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Aaw, thanks, TIWIIA! Pure comfort!

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