20 January 2022

Creamy Potato Casserole - also known as Funeral Potatoes

Creamy Potato Casserole - also known as Funeral Potatoes / www.delightfulrepast.com

Versions of this Creamy Potato Casserole have been around since before I was born and seem to enjoy a "revival" or surge in popularity every so many years. In some cultures and regions, the dish is called Funeral Potatoes because they are an absolute must at every funeral reception.

Many recipes call for frozen hash browns, which certainly would be a timesaver, but I've always made them with fresh potatoes. Most recipes call for a can of condensed cream of chicken, or cream of mushroom, soup. That's not something I ever buy, but I always have organic chicken broth on hand and so make up a sauce with that.

Super easy, and open to many variations, it's always a crowd pleaser at any event, not just funeral luncheons. So perhaps a more pleasant name for the dish would be Party Potatoes. But we just call it Potato Casserole. Instead of making it in a 13x9x2-inch baking dish, I used two smaller ones this time.

I meant to make one and freeze one so that I could tell you how well the dish freezes, but we ended up devouring both, so maybe you can tell me how well it freezes!


Creamy Potato Casserole - also known as Funeral Potatoes / www.delightfulrepast.com

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Creamy Potato Casserole


(Serves 12 to 16)

The Potatoes

4 pounds (1.8 kg) russet potatoes

The Sauce

4 tablespoons (2 ounces/57 grams) unsalted butter
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup (1.25 ounces/35 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 cup (8 fluid ounces/237 ml) milk
1 cup (8 fluid ounces/237 ml) chicken broth
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon marjoram
1/4 teaspoon thyme leaves
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

The Assembly

1 8-ounce (227 grams) container sour cream
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
1 packed cup (4 ounces/113 grams) shredded Monterey jack cheese
1 packed cup (4 ounces/113 grams) shredded cheddar cheese


1 In 5- to 6-quart Dutch oven, cook well scrubbed (but not peeled—they are much easier to peel after cooking) potatoes in boiling salted (1 teaspoon salt) water until tender but not overly so, about 30 minutes for large potatoes. Drain, remove from pan, and let cool a bit.

Note: My 5.5-quart Le Creuset enameled cast iron Dutch oven is too heavy for things like this that need draining. A lighter weight stainless steel 6-quart pot makes draining the potatoes so much easier.

2 While potatoes are cooling, make the sauce in the same pan the potatoes were cooked in. Melt the butter, cook the onions for about 5 minutes, stir in the flour, cook the flour for a minute or so. Stir in the milk, broth, and seasonings; cook, stirring frequently, until thickened.

Note: I know that seems like such a tiny amount of onion, but don't be tempted to increase it. It's supposed to add a subtle hint of onion to the dish, not completely take it over.

3 When potatoes are cool enough to handle, peel (or not) and cut into small cubes. Add to the sauce. Stir in the sour cream, salt and pepper, and shredded Monterey jack cheese until well combined. Taste and adjust seasoning. Turn into greased 13x9x2-inch baking dish. Top with shredded cheddar. Refrigerate until 1 hour before serving.

4 Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. Bake uncovered until hot and bubbly, about 55 minutes, if chilled, or 45 minutes, if baking right after preparation.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

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44 comments:

Kitchen Riffs said...

It's been forever since I've had this dish! And not one I've ever made -- I've always eaten it at "functions." Your recipe looks great and I want to try it. Thanks!

Jeanie said...

I've heard these called "Wedding" potatoes (which is a bit cheerier than "Funeral" potatoes. But no matter, they are delicious and your recipe looks like a good step above the canned soup versions I've seen and tried. Either way, a winner!

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Another reason, for me, to not hang out at funerals. Potatoes – any starch-binging staple, in fact – is dead to me. That said, I can appreciate their role in the food chain (hey, I’m Irish). And your preparation has eye appeal, for sure. Apart from all things potato, even your camera work has artful composition. Truth is, I’m not averse to the taste of potatoes, but they just kind of zero out on my taste buds. Nil sets. So, at risk of taking the “fun” out of funerals, I’ll pass the potatoes to the left. Also French fries, potato salad and potato chips. However, I’ll venture that freezing funeral potatoes would work right in there with a cryogenic corpse preservation. One last – and I seem to remember you addressing potato jackets. I do like potato skins, and will sometimes bake a russet potato, remove the insides, and insert a pat of butter. (…but I hate wasting food.)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John! I should have titled it "Function Potatoes." Hope you'll try it soon.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Jeanie. And "Wedding Potatoes" does sound cheerier!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sully. Glad you like the composition anyway! And I'm glad we agree on food waste, something I too hate.

April Harris said...

This sounds delicious, Jean! I much prefer the sound of Party Potatoes, although I have seen versions of this recipe called Funeral Potatoes before. Really like that you have used fresh potatoes and replaced the canned soup! Thank you for sharing and for being a part of the Hearth and Soul Community!

TONY said...

Well. I've never heard of ,"funeral potatoes." I've attended five funerals in the last three years. So many of a certain generation of my family were in their mid to late 90's. A sad few years in one way but so many wonderful memories of rich and well lead lives.They were all important to me in so many ways. At not one funeral did we have , "funeral potatoes," though. Must be American, surely?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thanks so much. Hope the Party Potatoes are a hit with your readers!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, so sorry. We, too, have attended about that many funerals in the same period of time. But since they were on Zoom, "at not one did we have funeral potatoes" either! :D

ellen b. said...

Oh boy, this does sound good, especially with homemade sauce and fresh potatoes. Thanks for the recipe and the tips!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Ellen! I hope your family will enjoy it.

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

Looks yummy! Thanks so much for linking up at the Unlimited Link Party 66. Pinned!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Dee. Much appreciated.

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

Jean, this dish looks really good! My hubby would love it, and I will save your recipe to make it for him. I have made a similar dish but this one sounds much better. Thank you!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Aaw thanks, Sandi! I hope you both enjoy it. It's true comfort food, especially during winter.

Karen said...

Hi Jean, thank you for visiting my blog!
My partner makes delicious scallop potato casserole from scratch too. I love a good potato casserole.

Cheryl said...

This sounds -- and looks -- quite good, Jean! I, too, am averse to the flavor of those "cream of" soups, so I like that you make your own sauce for this recipe.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Karen. A good potato casserole is especially good, and warming, on a nice cold winter day!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Cheryl, thank you. I'm glad I'm not the only one! Those soups just taste "off" to me.

David Scott Allen said...

Oh, I certainly like “party potatoes” more than “funeral potatoes.” I have had these, and can only imagine how much better yours will be using fresh potatoes and no cans of soup. Recipe is saved now for the next time I can go to a party.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, David! I've done pretty well with the limitations of the pandemic, but I soooo miss giving and attending small parties.

Sherry's Pickings said...

this looks wonderfully comforting jean. i confess i would probably have wanted to add more onion. such an interesting name for this dish.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sherry! Probably everyone has that temptation with the onions; then when they try it, they see that it was much better with just the small amount!

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

Visiting again to say thanks so much for linking up at the 25 and Done Link Party 4! 25 entries in 25 hours!! Shared onto Fb, Pn, and Tw!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Dee! That's great.

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

Potato dishes like this are so comforting and your recipe looks so much better than some others. Thanks!

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

CONGRATS! Your post is FEATURED at the 25 and Done Link Party 5! 25 entries in 25 hours!! Entries shared on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Gerlinde, thank you. Of course, *I* think it is! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Dee. SM shares are soooo appreciated.

Amy Johnson said...

Looks so yummy. Yes, I have seen this dish at many a church function!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Amy. Perfect for picnics because it seems to hold its heat for a long time, but then is good at room temperature as well.

Marilyn @ MountainTopSpice said...

I've had this casserole before Jean, and it is soo good! I agree, no leftovers, lol! It is always a treat to enjoy this dish!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Marilyn. I'm so in the mood for it right now, but alas no leftovers!

Tarahlynn said...

Thanks for sharing with us at to Grandma's house we go link party - I'll be featuring you this week when the new party starts!

Pauline Wiles said...

Wonderful comfort food - I had no idea of the funeral connection, but luckily I've not attended many. I'm not generally a fan of tipping canned soup into recipes, so thanks for the alternative!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Tarahlynn! I appreciate that!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pauline, I love the way you put that, "not generally a fan of tipping canned soup into recipes"—of course, you are a writer! And may 2022 be funeral-free!

laurensparks.net said...

Yum! Visiting you from the talent sharing tuesday link up.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Lauren! Nice to meet you!

Carol said...

This potato casserole looks yummy! Shared on Pinterest and Twitter. Thank you for linking up on Talent-Sharing Tuesdays.
Carol
www.scribblingboomer.com

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Carol, thank you! Much appreciated!

Stephanie 139a said...

They look good - though never heard that name before - thanks for joining us at #PoCoLo

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Stephanie, thanks so much!

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