23 April 2015

Pomme Rosti - Hash Browns with an Attitude?


Pomme Rosti - Hash Browns with an Attitude / www.delightfulrepast.com

It's funny, I can't make decent hash browns to save my life; but call them Pomme Rosti, and I have no problem! Does that make me a potato snob?

I hadn't thought about Pomme Rosti in years, then I had on PBS Roku the other day and came across it on something called ChefSteps and, of course, had to make it. But I do it a little differently. (I just found their short video about Pomme Rosti for you on YouTube.)

I don't use nonstick skillets, and I've always had trouble with hash browns or country-fried potatoes sticking to the pan. So when it was time to slide the pomme rosti out of the pan and turn it over, I was very pleasantly surprised (actually, I was shocked) when it slid right out of my stainless steel fry pan without the slightest bit of problem! 

Whatever you want to call the recipe, you need starchy potatoes, like russets or Yukon golds, not waxy potatoes. And yet, after the potatoes are shredded, you will be rinsing away as much starch as you can. Go figure. 

Anyway ... just 20 minutes in the pan and these potatoes are crunchy and brown on the outside, creamy and tender on the inside. And they're not just for breakfast. They are dinner party worthy. 

Aren't potatoes the best? (Especially mashed potatoes. Oh and potato salad.) What's your favorite kind of potatoes? Have you ever made pomme rosti?


Pomme Rosti - Hash Browns with an Attitude / www.delightfulrepast.com


Pomme Rosti - Hash Browns with an Attitude 


(Makes 6 servings) 

1.5 pounds (680 grams) Yukon gold potatoes, unpeeled, coarsely shredded 
7 tablespoons (3.5 ounces/99 grams) unsalted butter, melted 
1/4 + 1/8 teaspoon salt 
1/4 + 1/8 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 

1 Put shredded potatoes (I used the Cuisinart food processor to shred in just a few seconds) into a 2.5-quart bowl of ice water and swish them around. Drain them in your hands as you pull them out by handfuls, spread them on "an impeccably clean towel' (as Julia Child would say), roll up the towel and give it a good squeeze.

2 Preheat 12-inch slope-sided skillet over medium-high heat. Dry the bowl thoroughly and return the shredded potatoes to it. Pour on the melted butter, salt and pepper; mix well. Transfer potatoes to preheated skillet, pressing them down as much as you can.


Pomme-Rosti / www.delightfulrepast.com

In case you're wondering about the foil behind the pan, I put a 30x18-inch piece of heavy-duty foil over the back of the stove whenever I'm frying so I don't get the stove all greasy. But, no, I don't use a new piece of foil every time; I reuse it many times and then recycle it.

3 Cook over medium-high heat until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Slide them onto a plate.* Carefully place the skillet upside down over the potatoes and then flip the whole thing over and cook the other side until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. 

* I used the All-Clad Stainless 12-Inch Fry Pan to cook the potatoes and slid them onto its lid to turn the potatoes. The lid handle stuck down through the grate so it was steady as I slid the potato "pancake" onto it. Then I set the pan upside down over the potatoes and used potholders to flip the whole thing over. Worked like a charm! 

Note: If making this up to an hour ahead, preheat oven to 200F/93C. Leave it whole and place on a wire rack set inside a rimmed baking sheet in preheated oven. When ready to serve, proceed with Step 4. And eat it all; it really loses something when reheated the next day or even just hours later.

4 Slide onto a plate or cutting board. Cut into 6 wedges. Sprinkle on a bit more salt and coarsely ground pepper and garnish with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of fresh dill or your favorite fresh herb. Or with cheese or grilled onions or crispy little pieces of bacon or ...

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44 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Sometimes I wish I had not given up potatoes as too little return for too much of what I don’t want to eat (forgive this ex-patriot, Ireland). Your column sounds good, looks good…I think I can smell the potatoes and they even smell good. As an aside – potatoes are always an aside – the former chemical engineer student in me wants to believe that temperature and quick searing had something to do with the easy slide of your repast out of the pan. Just sayin’.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, Sully, I think that is the key. Potatoes (or meat or anything) are going to stick to the pan if you the temperature is too low or if you start turning or stirring too soon. I waited patiently for the right time with the Pomme Rosti, but I always get in a "short-order cook" hurry with mere hash browns!

Pauline Wiles said...

I've never made these, but have enjoyed the efforts of others.
And, Jean, the photo you posted of your finished dish is one of the most mouth-watering I've ever seen of a potato dish!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Pauline! Potatoes are so wonderful, but they *are* rather "plain Jane" looking!

My Garden Diaries said...

They are the best and they are gorgeous!!! I don't use non stick either so it was good to know that they slid right out! Thank you for the recipe friend...I can always count on you for food inspiration! Nicole xo

Jacquelineand.... said...

Haven't made these... yet. Wonder how they'd turn out in my cast iron skillet, hmmm. Everything you make looks so delicious!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Nicole! I love it when someone says I gave them "food inspiration"!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jacqueline, thank you! I think this would be fine in your cast iron as far as sticking, but it's a little easier sliding something out of a slope-sided skillet than a deeper one with higher sides. But give it a try and let me know how it turns out.

Christine said...

My daughter would love these. I only have a pan with vertical sides, though. Hmmm...
Your tip about foil on the back of the stove is brilliant! How have I never thought of that!?!?

Lulu James said...

A blast from my past which set my mouth salivating. I could, and do at times, live off of potatoes! Yes---hash browns in my book, but I like the attitude. Love to cook---don't do much of it anymore with only me to feed. Thank you for stopping by my place & I'll be back. It is almost as much fun to read the recipes as to cook!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Christine, thank you! I love it when someone appreciates my "brilliant" ideas! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Lulu! Your "It is almost as much fun to read the recipes as to cook!" is soooo true. On days when I'm ill or too tired to cook or something, I fill the desire by reading about food or watching food videos.

Linda Kay said...

Jean, it doesn't matter to me how potatoes are fixed, hash browns, baked, mashed, fries, potato chips....I'm a potato nut.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Linda, we'd get along fine then! It's all potatoes all the time around here!

Sippity Sup said...

These "hash browns" would give anyone a positive attitude. GREG

Brooks said...

Splendid looking potatoes, Jean. I like attitude!

Angie Schneider said...

I MUST make this for my parents in law next time when they visit us. It looks beyond delicious!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Greg! I think it would go great with your spinach stuffed roast salmon!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Brooks, thank you. Yes, a humble potato with attitude!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie! Let me know how they like it!

Jan Fredrik Lockert said...

This looks delicious, Jean. The video is very instructive. We have a long tradition of using potatoes in the Norwegian cuisine. (I didn't mention potato lefsa which I don't like.) Will try this out. Thanks for inspiration!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Jan! I've not heard of that dish, I'll have to look it up. I'm always interested in learning about new (to me) foods.

Katie Clooney said...

Hello dear Jean! I have spent the past half hours perusing your beautiful, delicious posts!! Love the name of your blog too. I sent your link to 3 of my non-blogging friends that love to cook. Have a wonderful weekend, Jean.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Katie, thank you so much! I don't know much about promotion, so I always appreciate it when someone like you spreads the word about Delightful Repast! Now if those three friends tell three friends ... :-)

Choclette Blogger said...

I didn't even know hash browns were the same thing as rosti. Whatever you call them, yours sound very tasty. I haven't made any for years AND I've never made hash browns ;-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Choclette, thanks! I don't know if they're exactly the same thing, but close. I'm going to make some more very soon.

Tony Grant said...

My favourite potatoes are Jersey Royals, Jean. Do you get them in the States? They have a very nice distinctive flavour. The compost used to grow them is made with seaweed gathered from the beaches of Jersey.
During the war, when the Germans occupied the Channel Islands, they took all of Jersey's best root potatoes back to Germany. Centuries of developing the Jersey Royal was lost. The people of Jersey had to start again developing the potato after the war. Jersey had a terrible time in the war.. The people were virtually enslaved and in a way the whole island became a concentration camp. Along with the people of Jersey, prisoners of war were brought over to Jersey to build the enormous concrete defences and gun emplacements the Germans constructed for the their so called Atlantic Wall. Underground hospitals were built too. Jersey is a beautiful island. My parents went there every year for years after the war, on holiday. It has beautiful beaches and rocky cliffs. However its dark past is around every corner. You can visit the underground hospitals and the great German defences to this day. The potatoes are doing well again though!!!! Ha! ha!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, no, we don't have Jersey Royals here. We have other varieties of "waxy" new potatoes, but none that would have the characteristic flavor of the Jersey Royals. sigh

Thank you for sharing Jersey's WWII history. That is not taught in the schools here and I had never heard of it until the British television series Island at War came out here.

My husband got tired of hearing me say "Why were never told about this?!" for weeks afterward. Philip Glenister, well, the entire cast really, were marvelous.

Marilyn Lesniak said...

Jean these look easy and very good! I am going to put some of this flare of yours to work in my kitchen. Thanks for sharing at Anything Goes!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marilyn! Everybody loves a potato!

Sara | Belly Rumbles said...

I don't think any one could be a potato snob, it's just how we are ;) Your hash browns look awesome.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sara! We wouldn't want to be snobs, potato or otherwise! :D

April J Harris said...

Jean, thank you for sharing this recipe with us at the Hearth and Soul hop. I have always wanted to make rosti but felt quite intimidated and was afraid it would all fall apart. Your Rosti look amazing and I can't wait to try the recipe. I'm sorry I'm so late commenting - it was a seriously busy week last week and I came down with a bug this week but I'm on the mend now! Pinning and will share your post. Hope to see you at the Hop again this week :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, I'm so sorry you've been ill. I hope you'll be all well very soon and stay that way! Let me know how the rosti turns out for you.

Michelle Nahom said...

Definitely a big potato fan here! I'm not very patient I must admit though, and usually my potato pancakes turn out mushier than I want. I know these are hash browns (gourmet hash browns), but the concept in making them starts the same. I need to work on this, because I love hash browns and potato pancakes!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Michelle, thank you! What I like about this is that once you pick your pan, pick your heat setting and use the same amount of potatoes, you can actually just set the timer and forget it. And that really helps with the 'getting impatient' part that I'm famous for!

Swathi Iyer said...

Delicious Jean, Hash browns are my favorite, this version sounds interesting.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Swathi! Aren't potatoes the most wonderful and versatile food!

Parsimonious Perfection said...

It's awful, but I've NEVER met a potato I didn't like, and your post had me at Pomme. ;)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, it's awful, PP! Every extra ounce on me is due to potatoes or bread (I'm not all that sweet on sugar)!

Pat said...

Ok I have never been able to make hash browns, fresh or frozen. It comes out a big mess. I'm going to try this recipe and will let you know how it goes.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pat, I'm so glad you're going to try it out and let me know how it goes! I can't wait to hear! Hoping for the best!

Pat said...

OK, I followed the directions on the recipe and everything was going good. Cooking nice and slow but the potatoes didn't brown at all so I tried turning up the heat a little bit. I cook my cornbread the same way, only in a smaller pan. I turn the cornbread out on a dish and flip it over back into the pan. It always comes out good so I figured I could do this too. Then I got distracted in the living room and when I went back to check the potatoes they were stuck in the pan. :( So ... I poured them out on my electric griddle and let them finish cooking. They were yummy and great. Try try again. :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Pat, glad it all worked out in the end! Did you heat your pan really really well, for several minutes, before putting the buttered potatoes in the pan? You should be using *medium-high* heat rather than "nice and slow" or they won't brown. Let me know how your next batch turns out!

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