16 August 2018

Garibaldi Biscuits - Currant Cookies - A British Classic

Garibaldi Biscuits - Currant Cookies - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

I was looking through a catalogue recently and came upon Garibaldi Biscuits and thought, It’s been too long since I’ve made, or even eaten a store-bought, Garibaldi. Of course, you can’t find an organic version, so I prefer to make them myself.

It’s a simple biscuit, invented in 1861 by John Carr (of Carr’s table water crackers fame) while he was working for Peek Freans instead of the family business and, for some reason, named after an Italian general who visited Britain in 1854.

I didn't put enough currants into this batch, just 1/2 cup; you should put in 3/4 cup as listed in the recipe. Since it's a biscuit that's all about the currants, you really can't skimp on the currants!

Garibaldi Biscuits - Currant Cookies - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com


Garibaldi Biscuits – Classic British Currant Cookies


(Makes 24 biscuits)

1 1/2 dip-and-sweep cups (7.5 ounces/213 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 cup (1.75 ounces/50 grams) sugar
1/2 teaspoon non-GMO baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons (2 ounces/grams) unsalted butter
3 tablespoons (1.5 fluid ounces/45 ml) water or milk
1 large egg, beaten
3/4 cup (3.75 ounces/106 grams) dried currants

1 Preheat 350F/180C/Gas4. Tear off a 15x12-inch (38x30 cm) sheet of parchment.

2 In medium mixing bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. With fingers, rub butter into flour mixture until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.

3 In glass measuring cup, whisk together milk and egg. Remove 1 1/2 tablespoons of it to use as an egg wash for the top later. Add the liquid to the flour mixture a little at a time, mixing with your hands, adding only enough to make a slightly crumbly dough. Form it into a disc.

4 Place dough onto lightly floured parchment and with lightly floured rolling pin, roll it into a 12x10-inch (30x25 cm) rectangle. Sprinkle the currants evenly over one half of the dough. Turn the other half of the dough over onto the fruited side. With lightly floured rolling pin, roll out the dough to a 15x8-inch (38x20 cm) rectangle. It will be about as thick as a pie crust.

Garibaldi Biscuits - Currant Cookies - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

5 Place the finished dough, still on its parchment, onto a large baking sheet. Using a fork, dock (poke holes) the dough. Using a plastic pizza wheel, trim the dough to an even 14x7-inch (35x18cm) rectangle (leave the trimmings in place) and cut the dough in half the long way and then into 1.125x3.5-inch (3x9 cm) strips and do not separate them. Bake the biscuits for about 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Cool on wire rack and break apart. 

Garibaldi Biscuits - Currant Cookies - A British Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

Note: That very precise “1.125” or 1 1/8 inches is because that is the width of the 18-inch metal ruler I use in the kitchen, and the ruler makes cutting the dough very easy.

Jean

58 comments:

NanaDiana said...

Sounds so good. Just wondering-do you "plump" the currants first? I know my mother always added a bit of hot water to plump them up and then drained it completely off. I love currants and we used to have bushes full of them when I was a kid.
Thanks for the recipe!!! xo Diana

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Diana! No, for this application, the dried currants don't need plumping. Just use them as is. I think plumped currants would get too squishy because these are rolled out pretty thin.

Cranberry Morning said...

They look wonderful! Can you just mail them to me? ;-)

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

“Currantly” [sic] speaking, I’m into all things cherry this summer, but this is close enough for me to be intrigued. The Italian General must’ve been trying to liven up his hardtack.

My Recipe Treasures said...

I have actually never heard of Garibaldi Biscuits, but these sound really good. Thank you for sharing at To Grandma's House We Go.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Judy! Wish I could just pop over with a batch for you!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Well, Sully, "intrigued" is good. And do feel free to make this with chopped up dried cherries. I use a lot of those, they're wonderful. I never buy more than a pound of fresh organic cherries at a time because I know I'm going to eat them all, by myself, as soon as I get them home!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, MRT. Being an English thing, they are probably not too widely known in lots of places.

Jeanie said...

I haven't heard of Garibaldi biscuits either but this recipe relly looks like a keeper! I even have currants at home!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Jeanie. It's something a little different!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

Your biscuits, which look very lovely and just as they should be by the way, take me back to my childhood. Garibaldi biscuits were one of a select few of favourite biscuits that always put a smile on my face. Of course, they were only called Garibaldis when we asked for them in the shop, everyone called them 'squashed fly' biscuits at home. There was a story that Garibaldi sat down at the end of one of his lectures and accidentally sat on a much thicker, more traditional currant biscuit. The flattened biscuit was said to have been Mr Carr's inspiration. (No of course I don't believe it). Oddly in the early 2000s there was a brief trend for larger, homemade Garibaldis (along with Bourbon biscuits and Jammy Dodgers) to appear in slightly ironic desserts in some trendy restaurants around the UK. Most people seemed to hate the idea but I confess that I rather enjoyed those desserts.

Lorrie said...

These look scrumptious to have with a cup of tea in the afternoon!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Phil, thank you. I'm going to bake them at a slightly higher temperature (or something) next time to increase the browning, but I really like them. The "squashed fly biscuits" sounds like a name that was surely started and carried on by small boys!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lorrie, thanks. Yes, must have them with a cup of tea!

Louca por porcelana said...

They look delicious!Hugs,Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Maristela!

Margie said...

This is the first time I've heard of Garibaldi Biscuits. They look like they're perfect for tea time.

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

My goodness you never disappoint, Jean. Garibaldi biscuit history is so interesting. I've never made them, but thanks to you I will. ♥

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Margie. I'm always happy to introduce something new (but old!). My husband likes them because they're not too sweet.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Martha, that is so sweet, thank you! Do let me know how they turn out for you.

FABBY'S LIVING said...


In your visit to me you said you feel at home with my Onion china, as I can see why dear friend.
Oh my those JG biscuits look delish, my husband's favorite kind of cookie type. Thanks for sharing.
Hugs,
Fabby

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Fabby. We like them a lot because they're not overly sweet and go so well with tea. And, yes, love the Blue Onion!

Angie Schneider said...

These look 10 times better than the storebought one! Love the add of dried currants, Jean.

Pauline Wiles said...

Of course I'm very familiar with Garibaldis but never considered their translation as "currant cookies"! I must say, yours look far nicer than the ones we used to buy.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Angie!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Pauline. I could have been a little neater with them, but was in a bit of a hurry.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

What a wonderful tea time treat, Jean! I never heard about this biscuit, but I'd love to try them. Thanks for sharing another delicious recipe.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Kitty! It's kind of a fun recipe!

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

I've had these before but never knew what they were called. They were no doubt packaged ones I had and home made would be ever so much better. Another fascinating recipe; thank you, Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sandi. I love it that my readers find some of my recipes a bit out of the ordinary!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

I have never had a Garibaldi Biscuit, Jean, but I will be having one soon! Can’t wait to try this recipe... literally, it will probably happen this weekend. (I just checked my currant supply and I am good to go!) Thanks for another treat of which I’d not heard!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Cool! Thanks so much, David. Let me know how they turn out. They're very "plain" and meant to be eaten with a cup of tea.

ellen b. said...

I always enjoy peeking in here to see what you are up to in the kitchen. These are new to me...

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Ellen, thank you! :-)

Debbie-Dabble Blog and A Debbie-Dabble Christmas said...

Looks yummy!!
Thanks so much for stopping by!!
Hugs,
Deb

Bernideen said...

those look so pretty Jean and I love the slender way you cut them. Yummy! Thanks for sharing.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Debbie. And they are from your favorite time, the Victorian era!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Bernideen. And they just happened to fit perfectly in that little tin I've had forever!

Tony Grant said...

Garibaldis and also Bourbons Sigh!!!!!! Do you eat Bourbons in the States too? I have a weakness for Bourbons.If ever you want to tempt me Jean just say, Bourbon!! and I will melt like butter on hot toast. Garibaldis are part of my childhood.When Garibaldi himself came to Britain in June 1864 he landed in Southampton.The British, especially the working classes really took to him. He sorted out Italy anyway. He stayed the night at what is now the Tudor House Museum in the old town near the port. I know you don't usually get into politics, Jean, but America and Britain need a Garibaldi!!!! Is this why you have turned to political themes in cooking now?

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tony, ha! No "political themes in cooking" intended--I just like Garibaldi Biscuits! Yes, Bourbons are available here, but I don't like crème-filled (sandwich) cookies of any kind. Even as a child, if I encountered one I always twisted the cookie apart and scraped off the filling.

Miz Helen said...

Your cookies look so special, I would love to try this recipe! Hope you are having a great day and thanks so much for sharing your post with us at Full Plate Thursday!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Miz Helen! I hope you'll like them as much as we do.

JakiJellz said...

Oh my, I haven't had these in SO long! I love them. My mouth is watering just looking at the photographs! Thanks for sharing with #TriumphantTales, do come back next week!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jaki! They're so easy to make, and kids and adults like them.

Connie said...

Hello Jean, I don't think I have had these before and they look yummy!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Connie, thank you. I hope you'll try them soon. They go beautifully with tea.

Kitchen Riffs said...

These look good! Love currants, and don't use them nearly as often as I should. Really nice recipe -- thanks.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. I really like them because they're not overly sweet even though they're packed with currants.

Tarahlynn said...

Thanks for sharing with us at the To Grandma's House we go link party!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Tarah. I always enjoy seeing what great DIY project you're doing next!

All That I'm Eating said...

Such a classic biscuit, I could really go one now with a cup of tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, ATIE! I'll be making them again soon. So perfect with a cup of tea!

Chickenruby said...

they look really yummy, sadly biscuits give me migraines so i don't eat them, cakes don't though which I find strange #triumphanttales

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Suzanne, I'm really interested in the subject of migraines, so please tell me more about what you've experienced with biscuits and cakes!

Bea Long said...

On my way to make these now. I had lost my mother's recipe and was shocked when I found this one!! Thanks so much. I grew up eating these Sunshine brand cookies and had bought a $3 pack of Crawford the other day, knowing I had to make them again.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Bea, I'm so glad you found this! I hope you have fun making them and eating them!

Bea Long said...

OMG, tastes just like I remember only better!! Thanks so much, this is my 4th yes 4th time now making them. Thank you again Jean, you're my hero.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Bea, thank you so much! You've just made my day. Whatever else happens today, your comment will be a highlight!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...