18 April 2019

Cherry Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Cerises

Cherry Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Cerises - the classic rustic yet elegant French dessert / www.delightfulrepast.com

Cherry Clafoutis (pronounced cla-foo-TEE) is the original clafoutis from the Limousin region of France. Limousin is also the home of the famous oak used in barrels for aging wine and brandy. But that is neither here nor there. We’re talking dessert. One so good it spread from there all over the country in the 19th century.

Throughout winter I was making Cranberry-Apple Clafoutis—I like to eat with the seasons—but now that cherry season is nearly upon us, I could no longer put off the classic Cherry Clafoutis. But the season isn’t quite here, so I used frozen cherries for this one. I have no patience.


Cherry Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Cerises - the classic rustic yet elegant French dessert / www.delightfulrepast.com


The texture of this rustic yet elegant dessert, somewhere between a cake and a custard, needs to be right. Where cooks can go wrong is adding too much flour, making the clafoutis decidedly cakey or at least cakier than it should be. But, to paraphrase Hamlet:

To pit, or not to pit: that is the question. Traditionally the pits are left in, supposedly to allow them to impart a bit of almond-y flavor to the dish; but I think it was because some lazy busy cook decided to skip that step, made up that little story and, voilĂ , people fell for it! You know I love tradition, perhaps more than most, but I’m also fond of my teeth.

Not to mention, Mr Delightful does not like dealing with pits privately, let alone publicly. Nor would he like sitting at the dinner table watching several people dealing with pits simultaneously. And where would they put them, I ask you.


Cherry Clafoutis - Clafoutis aux Cerises - the classic rustic yet elegant French dessert / www.delightfulrepast.com
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Cherry Clafoutis


(Makes 8 servings)

1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 to 2 1/2 cups pitted fresh sweet cherries, (from about 16 ounces/454 grams whole cherries)
OR 1 10-ounce bag frozen organic pitted sweet cherries
1/2 cup (3.5 ounces/99 grams) sugar, divided
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
3 large eggs
1 tablespoon brandy

3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract1/4 teaspoon almond extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 dip-and-sweep cup (2.5 ounces/71 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups (10 fluid ounces/296 ml) milk

Garnish: powdered sugar

1 Preheat oven to 350F/180C/Gas4. Butter a Pyrex Easy Grab 9.5-Inch Deep Dish Pie Plate, not the standard 9-inch pie plate, with the 1/2 tablespoon softened butter. In a small dish, melt the tablespoon of butter and leave to cool slightly.

2 Spread the pitted cherries (if using frozen cherries, there’s no need to thaw) in prepared dish in a single layer. Stir together 1/8 cup sugar and cinnamon; sprinkle evenly over the fruit.

3 In a 1-quart glass measure, whisk together the eggs, all but 1 tablespoon of the remaining sugar (save it to sprinkle on top), melted butter, brandy, vanilla extract, almond extract and salt. Whisk in the flour and then the milk, adding it gradually at first, to make a smooth batter. If it’s not as smooth as it should be, you can hit it with an immersion blender. Don’t drag out your blender for this one; a whisk will get the job done.


4 Pour the batter over the fruit. Sprinkle on the reserved tablespoon of sugar. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until puffed and golden and browning around the edges and pulling away from the edges of the pan. Then it falls; that is perfectly normal.

5 Let stand 10 to 20 minutes before serving warm. Add a dusting of powdered sugar, if you like, just before serving. 

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support.

Jean

58 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

I pit-y the pitted. And you have nice teeth. Dessert looks good enough to eat! And I remember when that Cherry Clapboa…Clapflap…Clapstuff came out. Yup. I was there. Good ol’ 19th C. in my limousine in Limousin. You’ve got the crust perfect too. In those days we didn’t know about the arsenic in cherry pits, another reason to spit your pits.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, but please don't spit them while sitting at the table! I have horrible dining scenes etched into my brain--someone pulling out a little tooth-flossing device at the table when he finished his lunch; oh and even worse, the guy in the fine restaurant who didn't just blow his nose at the table, but used the cloth napkin to do so!

Art and Sand said...

I am picturing a table full of people removing the pits.

As to where to put them, there must be beautiful individual ironstone bowls for the pits. Perhaps they are called pit stops.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Too funny, Carol--pit stops! I would like that ever so much more than a big spittoon in the middle of the table!

Sylvia Graceforagypsy.com said...

Yummy! Thanks for linking up at the #WednesdayAIMLinkParty 35

Louca por porcelana said...

Hummm,love desserts...Yours looks divine!Hugs!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sylvia.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Maristela!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

That's just lovely and perfect for a sunny day (yes, it really was sunny today). You're right to warn against excessive flour use - too much flour really does change this dish into something very different. As for the pits (well, we call them stones in England), I think leaving them in has more to do with appearance than flavour. The cherries can look a little more regular in the window of an expensive patisserie or boulangerie if they're not pitted. I'm not at all convinced that it changes the flavour. Rather than the flavour, I think the main difference is around 10 euros per clafoutis.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Phil. Glad you had a sunny spring day. Funny about the pit/stone thing: in the US, they call cherries, peaches, etc, "stone fruits," but then turn around and use "pits." Either way, I'm for keeping them out of my food! Glad you agree with me about the flour.

Karen @ Beatrice Euphemie said...

This looks so delicious, and has a nice, rustic look. I have cherries in the freezer and a wee bit of rum in the cupboard. I think I'm good to go! Thanks for the recipe and tip about the flour :) x Karen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Karen, I'm glad it appeals to you! Hope you like it.

Mary said...

I love cherry clafoutis, I will have to try your recipe as I have never made it before

Jeanie said...

I've never made clafouti before. I might have to try this one. It looks beautiful and delicious! Happy Easter!

Vee said...

Oh I do love clafoutis. I haven't made one for some time now...I'm thinking a frozen blueberry one would be yummy.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Hi Lea Ann, Angie, Others who commented ~ If you've come back to look for your comment (and my reply) made sometime between last night and this morning, I must apologize. I started working before I was quite awake, I guess, because I hit Delete instead of Publish on several comments (just happen to remember the first two names). I hope I learned my lesson and will never do THAT again!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Mary, I hope you'll like it as much as others you've had!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jeanie. And, after all, Michigan cherries!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Vee, thanks. I think that would be wonderful. I almost made this one with blackberries. Next time.

Lowcarb team member said...

Hello Jean,
Many thanks for sharing another delicious recipe. I always enjoy my visits to your blog.

We also like them, but as husband Eddie is Type 2 diabetic I make a lower carb version:
Fruit and Almond Clafoutis : Low in Carbs and Delicious
https://thelowcarbdiabetic.blogspot.com/2018/02/fruit-and-almond-clafoutis-low-in-carbs.html

Enjoy the Easter weekend.

All the best Jan

Lauren @ My Wonderfully Made said...

Oooooh . . . this looks so good! I've not heard of this so glad you gave the pronunciation! I too would go with 'no pits'. It looks like a simple enough recipe and gives such a beautiful result!

Mariam said...

What a wonderful recipe! Thanks for sharing!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jan. Your lower carb version sounds lovely. I hope your husband can turn his diabetes around soon.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Lauren. Yes, that's what I like about it, quick and easy to put together *and* a rustic yet elegant result.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Mariam!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

I am so glad that you pitted the cherries… The first time I had this in Provence, no one warned me that they leave the pits in. I nearly broke a tooth! That said, it is always been one of my favorite desserts from the region! Thanks for sharing your recipe, and happy Easter!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, David. I'm having a lovely, perfectly relaxing weekend!

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

I'd love to try your recipe, Jean! I'd be using the frozen cherries. Thank you so much for sharing. Happy Easter to you and Mr. Delightful!

Miz Helen said...

Jean, what a beautiful dessert that we will love, can't wait to try it! Thanks so much for sharing your post with us this week and hope you have a very special weekend!
Miz Helen

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

What a lovely dessert, minus the pits, and cherries are so good for you! I remember a number of years ago, I had my family over for dinner and served cherry cheesecake for dessert. My son bit down on a cherry and I could hear the crunch. He never mentioned it, but I hope he didn't have to get a tooth fixed. I double check the cherries now for pits. It still gives me the shivers when I think of it. Hope you're enjoying a wonderful Easter weekend and thank you for sharing this recipe.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Kitty. Hope you like it! When I make it with fresh cherries, I'm going to cut the cherries in half; to me, that's just easier than using a cherry pitter.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Miz Helen. Hope you have a wonderful weekend as well.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Sandi. And I think it's a great idea to double-check the cherries for pits. It says right on the bag that there could be some, but …

Jennifer@MyFlagstaffHome said...

Oooooo, yummy... and pretty! Thanks for sharing at the Weekend Blog Hop at My Flagstaff Home. --Jennifer

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jennifer! And it's easy!

Zaa said...

YUMMY JEAN...
I've never baked with cherries so this will be a first for me... as I do love them. Wishing you a Happy Easter sweet lady ...Hugs

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Zaa, thanks so much! I hope your weekend is going perfectly.

Angie's Recipes said...

Clafotis is always a favourite! I can't wait for the cherry season arrive here so I can make this! Thanks, Jean, for sharing another great recipe!
Happy Easter!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Angie, thank you. I always say, summer fruit is the only thing I like about summer!

Cheryl said...

Hi, this looks totally delicious! My husband's French, and a chef - I'm going to ask him to make this for me! I love cherries! Thank you for the recipe, and I wish you a great week ahead. :-)

Suchot said...

I love clafoutis and haven't made one in a few years - I kinda just forgot about them! Thanks for the yummy reminder :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Cheryl, that's great! My husband is part French-Canadian and NOT a chef! :D Let me know how you like clafoutis.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Suchot. There are so many good things to make, I often make something several times, and then it just gets bumped off the radar by something else, until I'm reminded!

April J Harris said...

That is a beautiful clafoutis, Jean! Your pastry looks wonderful too. I have had cherry clafoutis in restaurants in France and yours looks every bit as good, if not better!

The 'to pit or not to pit' dilemma made me smile. My husband spent a lot of his childhood in France, and on one occasion, he bit into a piece of cherry clafoutis only to discover the pits had not been removed. It honestly (sadly) put him off cherries ever since!

I hope you had a lovely Easter. Thank you so much for your support of Hearth and Soul.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you. AND for sharing your and your husband's clafoutis experiences! Love #HearthAndSoul!

Margie said...

Looks great, Jean! I prefer the pit-less version too.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Margie. We don't need any dental emergencies!

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

Clafoutis is such a wonderful easy to make dessert ! Your cherry clafoutis looks great.

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

I love clafoutis and when using cherries I prefer the pitted version,

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Another vote for pitted! Thanks, Gerlinde. Can't wait to get more cherries and make another.

Cheryl said...

Oh goodness. Your clafoutis is making my mouth water! Daughter Kati, who is getting married in a few weeks, does not like cherries (I cannot imagine) so we seldom have cherry desserts. Maybe I can cheer myself up after the wedding by making cherry clafoutis! Doesn't that sounds like a good plan?! :)

(Sorry to have become an infrequent commenter. After the May wedding and June graduation, I hope to be more present!)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Cheryl, you are so sweet! Hard to believe Kati is getting married--but, yes, cheer yourself up afterward with something she wouldn't like! :D How nice that you'll soon have more time. Thanks for taking the time to stop in here!

Kitchen Riffs said...

Yup, I've read that in the "authentic" version of this classic one shouldn't pit the cherries. I'm with you -- that idea is the pits! We always pit. Never tried this with frozen cherries -- I should, because their quality if often quite good (sometimes better than the fresh ones). Good post -- thanks.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John! And I don't know why I didn't think of "that idea is the pits"--but I know I can always count on you for a good pun! :D

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

This light French dessert has always been a favorite of mine and yes to pitting the cherries. Leaving the pits in reminds me of a flat bread made with grapes that I had in Italy at a vineyard during their harvest. It was good but the grapes had seeds. Not my cup of tea to munch on seeds.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Karen, I so agree. Some of my favorite grapes have seeds, which is fine if I'm just eating some grapes. But I don't want grape seeds in my flat bread!

Lazy Gastronome said...

This looks so good! I want to take a bite. Thank for sharing at the What's for Dinner party - hope to see at next week's party tomorrow!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Lazy Gastronome! Wish I had some right now.

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