02 January 2020

Steamed Persimmon Pudding - Instant Pot or Not

Steamed Persimmon Pudding - Instant Pot or Not / www.delightfulrepast.com

Steamed Persimmon Pudding is one of my favorite comfort food desserts during the cold months of persimmon season. This is the Instant Pot electric pressure cooker version. (Note: A persimmon is known as 'kaki' in some countries.)

If you’d like to make it on the stovetop or in the slow cooker, go to my original Steamed Persimmon Pudding post. There you’ll also find my recipe for Brandy Butter Hard Sauce.

It’s a classic sauce for this, but what I like even more with it is Custard Sauce (Creme Anglaise). Try both with it and let me know which you prefer. A little vanilla ice cream partially melting next to the warm pudding makes a lovely sauce as well.


Steamed Persimmon Pudding - Instant Pot or Not / www.delightfulrepast.com
Couldn't resist doing a little watercolor painting while waiting another day 
for the persimmons to ripen.

Both pudding and sauce can be made ahead. Just reheat the pudding before serving it topped with the cold sauce. I also like it at room temperature with whipped cream.

Be sure your Hachiya persimmons are perfectly ripe and squishy-soft. It’s handy to have a supply of persimmon puree in the freezer. Just cut your squishy-soft persimmons in half, scoop out the pulp and mash it with a fork; you shouldn't even need to use the blender or immersion blender to puree it. Stir in 1 1/2 teaspoons of lemon juice per cup of persimmon. Freeze in glass containers for up to 6 months.

I hate recipes that are vague; as in calling for "2 medium persimmons." First of all, "medium" of one variety of persimmon is not "medium" of another. And who decides what "medium" is? A recent batch of store-bought Hachiya persimmons averaged out to 7.25 ounces/205 grams, so that is my definition of a medium Hachiya persimmon.


Steamed Persimmon Pudding - Instant Pot or Not (with Brandy Butter Hard Sauce, this photo) / www.delightfulrepast.com


Steamed Persimmon Pudding


(Makes 6 servings) 

1/2 cup (2.8 ounces/80 grams) raisins
3 tablespoons (1.5 fluid ounces/44 ml) brandy, rum or hot tea
3/4 cup (6.625 ounces/188 grams) persimmon puree*
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 dip-and-sweep cup (5 ounces/142 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
 
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon cloves
1/4 cup (1.75 ounces/50 grams) sugar
2 tablespoons (1 ounce/28 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 large egg, room temperature
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/3 cup (2.66 fluid ounces/79 ml) milk

1/3 cup (1.33 ounces/38 grams) chopped pecans or walnuts 

* From about 1 1/2 "medium" (7.25 ounces/205 grams) Hachiya persimmons

1 In small bowl, soak raisins in brandy, rum or hot tea for 30 minutes to plump them. Start them off with 15 seconds or so in the microwave, then cover them and let them steam. 

2 Butter well a 2-inch deep 7-inch round cake tin or 3-inch deep 6-inch round cake tin. Put a round of parchment paper in the tin and butter it as well. 

3 Stir baking soda into persimmon puree and let stand 5 minutes while proceeding with recipe.

4 In 1.5-quart bowl, whisk together flour, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves. 

5 In medium bowl with a wooden spoon, cream butter and sugar. Beat in egg, then persimmon puree, followed by the vanilla and milk. Stir in the flour mixture followed by the nuts and raisins. Turn into buttered tin and cover tightly with foil. 

6 Place rack (with its handles up) in bottom of the Instant Pot cooking pot, and add 2 cups of boiling water to the pot. Center the pudding on the rack.

7 Put on the optional Instant Pot glass lid. Plug in the Instant Pot. Press the Saute key to select that program. Press the Saute key as many times as it takes to change the temperature indicator to Less. Press the Plus or Minus key to change the cooking time to 20 minutes to pre-steam the pudding before pressure cooking.

Note: You need to start with hot water because the Instant Pot set on the Saute function starts counting down the minutes right away (and does not display the minutes, just the word “Hot,” so I set a kitchen timer just to be sure!). 



8 When the beep sounds, it turns Off. Remove the optional Instant Pot glass lid and put the pressure cooking lid in place. Turn the steam valve to Sealing. Press the Pressure Cook key. Leave the indicator on High Pressure and change the cooking time to 35 minutes for the 7-inch pan or 40 minutes for the 6-inch pan.


Note: Since it is already hot, it only takes about 4 minutes to come up to pressure.

9 When the beep sounds, it turns Off. Allow the pressure to release naturally for 20 minutes, then do a quick release by turning the steam valve to Venting. Then leave the lid in place for another 10 minutes.

10 Carefully remove the lid and wipe any condensation off the foil covering. Using potholders or oven gloves and the handles on the rack, carefully lift out the pudding and set on wire cooling rack. Remove the foil. The pudding should be slightly pulling away from the edges of the pan. Let stand for 15 minutes before unmolding onto a small platter. Slice and serve warm with whipped cream, brandy butter hard sauce or, my favorite, Custard Sauce.

Note: If making it ahead, even a day or two before, cover and store pudding at room temperature and then reheat before serving. 

11 While pudding is steaming, make Brandy Butter Hard Sauce or Custard Sauce. If you prefer your Custard Sauce cold, make it several hours or up to 2 or 3 days ahead. Hard Sauce can be made way ahead; it needs to be refrigerated at least 2 hours or up to 3 weeks.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

63 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

You got me at “squishy soft,” though your recipe sounds a wee bit like a med school primer for gall bladder surgery. Brandy butter hard sauce starts my mouth watering. Good post-op meal in itself. Squishy soft persimmons, hard brandy butter. I do like contrasts. Happy New Year!

thepaintedapron.com said...

I have never cooked with persimmons! Your watercolor is lovely!
Jenna

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, I've actually been in the operating room observing a gall bladder surgery, and I assure you the resemblance is slight to nonexistent! :D May you enjoy all of life's contrasts.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Jenna! And I hope you'll try this (or something) with persimmons very soon.

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

I have never used persimmons, Jean, but I’d love to taste your steamed pudding. It looks and sound delicious. Happy New Year of cooking and baking!

Natalia said...

Oh yum! That looks so good ☺☺

Tamago said...

Back in my hometown in Japan, there are many persimmon trees in the gardens. We had two at home and I loved eating fresh persimmons. But I never came across persimmon pudding! What a great way to use them! Your pudding looks super yummy :-)

Vee said...

Sounds exotic to me! I am quite sure that I have never eaten a persimmon.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, thank you. I hope you'll get your hands on some persimmons soon and give this, or some yummy baked good, a try. I think you'll like it. Happy cooking and baking to you, too! :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Natalia. I'm making another one soon with the persimmon puree I froze.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Vee, you *have* to try them! You will love them and feel so "exotic" eating them! :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Tamago. I knew the fruit originated in Japan, and it's good to hear there are many persimmon trees in the gardens there. A beautiful sight, I'm sure.

Jeanie said...

A very big yum. I've never made anything with persimmon!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thank you. I hope you'll make something with persimmons soon. You're sure to love it.

TONY said...

I don't think I have ever eaten a persimmon Jean. However I would definitely try this. All fruit is good for you after all. I like trying new (to me) things.

I like your water colour painting. It is a while since we have seen your artistic efforts, apart from the the photography of course. Have you tried painting watercolours of other subjects? Painting and sketching makes you look closely and engages you at a deep level I think. Great for mindfulness and mental wellbeing. However, having said that, some famous artists were insane.
Oh sorry, I am not suggesting anything Jean. Ha! Ha!
Happy New Year to Mr Delightful and yourself.
All the best, Tony

Tante Mali said...

Jean, this recipe is amazing. It's mouthwatering while reading! Have to try it. And you are not only a food artist, your water colour painting is super cute.
Thank you so much for your lovely words on my blog.
All my best from Austria
Happy new year
Elisabeth

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Hi Tony, thank you. I hope you and M have a wonderful 2020 as well. Yes, I paint other things besides fruits and vegetables. Birds and other animals, some little characters, landscapes, trees, whatever occurs to me. As you said, it makes you look closely--I've never looked so closely at a persimmon before! :-) I do hope you'll hunt down some persimmons and give them a try!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Elisabeth, thank you so much. I do like painting fruit as well as cooking with it! If you make the recipe, I hope you'll come back and let me know how it turned out for you. I don't know when persimmons are available in Austria. Hope you have a wonderful 2020.

Unknown said...

That looks amazing, Jean, although I have to admit I have never tasted a persimmon in my life! I guarantee our local market up here wouldn't carry them (their produce section is tiny) but I'll have to keep an eye out for them when I'm off the mountain next. Happy New Year!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Debbie, you're not alone! I'm finding that lots of people have never had a persimmon! Be sure to look for them next time you're off the mountain and let me know what you think!

Pauline Wiles said...

Jean, I'm entering my third under-the-weather week, so comfort food like this looks incredibly appealing at the moment!
And, your persimmon painting is beautiful. You have a really nice foodie collection coming together now.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh Pauline, you are too kind! I'm so sorry you're still under the weather. Hope you're soon back to normal. Wish I could bring you warming comfort food every day until you're better!

Angie's Recipes said...

It sounds and looks incredibly delicious! I would love to taste some too :-))

Gerlinde de Broekert said...

I love persimmons and I am always interested in new recipes. Yours looks great, right up my alley.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. And it goes so beautifully with tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Gerlinde! And are they called 'persimmons' in Germany? Or 'kaki' as in some places, I've just learned?

Victoria Zigler said...

Got to try doing something like this...

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Victoria, I think you'll like it. Let me know if you try it. When shopping for persimmons, you might find they are called 'kaki' as in some countries.

Victoria Zigler said...

Thanks for the heads up on that.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

I just learned that yesterday, Victoria! I should add it to the post.

Marisa said...

That looks so yummy! <3
Happy new year!

https://ahomewithcare.blogspot.com/

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Marisa. Have a wonderful 2020!

Dee | Grammy's Grid said...

Another recipe to try in my Instant Pot! Thanks so much for linking up at the #UnlimitedMonthlyLinkParty 8. Pinned.

Marilyn @ MountainTopSpice said...

I've never tried persimmon, although the recipe looks and sounds quite delicious! I love how you share intricate details of the recipe. I must look for persimmon puree, but I wonder, would any other fruit work as a substitute? Love your watercolor of the persimmon, beautiful work! Blessings :)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Dee! Yes, I'm loving my Instant Pot way more than I ever expected to!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Marilyn, thanks so much. Of course, it's an entirely different flavor, but you can use 3/4 cup pumpkin puree in this recipe and it's delicious. Hope you can find some persimmons. You definitely need to try them.

Jeff the Chef said...

I've never made a steamed Pudding and I've always wanted to.

Lutheran Liar said...

OMG. Now I wish I’d saved all those darned persimmons we used as “weapons” as children. They make excellent projectiles. Persimmons, not children. Well, maybe both.

Ellen Best said...

I came via Esme's new link share and blooming wow! Artistic with food and paint I am so pleased to have virtually met you.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh Jeff, you must! And DO let me know how it turns out for you!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Yes, LL, yes toss the children but keep the persimmons! :D Lots of wonderful things you can make with persimmons.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Ellen! Likewise!

Margie said...

Happy New Year, Jean!

To my knowledge, I haven't had persimmon, but I'd love to try your tasty pudding.

Thanks for the visit and blogiversary wish!

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

I don't believe I have ever tasted persimmons. Your pudding looks amazing and I wish I could try a dish of it. Any pudding that is steamed has got to be delicious! You did a lovely job of the watercolour, Jean. Thank you for sharing it with us.

Jean | Delightful Repast said...

Margie, so many people haven't. You must try it. This goes so beautifully with tea!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Sandi. I'm having a lot of fun with the painting. I hope you'll try this next time you see some persimmons and let me know how you liked them.

April J Harris said...

As you probably know, Jean, steamed puddings are incredibly popular in the UK, especially this time of year. They normally take such a long time to make though - I'm so excited you've made an instant pot version. This may actually be the recipe that gets me to finally buy an instant pot! Your persimmon steamed pudding looks beautiful. I confess I've never tasted persimmon but this looks like a great way to try them. Thank you for being a part of the Hearth and Soul Community. I'm featuring your post at the party this week. Happy New Year!

CRYSTAL, TIGGER & DAISY MAE said...

Thanks for recipe. My name is Crystal and I come to you through Esme's Senior Salon.

Crystal said...

I like your recipe and thanks
Crystal

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you so much! I've recently learned that in many countries a persimmon is known as a 'kaki' and lots of people have never tried them, by any name! I hope you'll give it a try. And, yes, I'd love my Instant Pot even if all it was good for was steamed puddings!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Crystal. I'm glad you found me. I'm looking forward to looking at your photos. *I* rarely take pictures of anything but food!

Cindy said...

This sounds amazing! I’ve never cooked with persimmons so I’m excited to try something new.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Cindy, thank you. And I'm excited FOR you! Do let me know how it turns out for you.

Miz Helen said...

Your persimmon pudding looks so good, we will love it! Thanks so much for sharing with us on Full Plate Thursday,465 and hope you are having a great week!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Miz Helen. I'm making another one tomorrow!

Kitchen Riffs said...

I rarely use persimmons. And never make steamed puddings! But now you have me in the mood for both. :-) Thanks! And Happy New Year!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks! It's high time you and Mrs Riffs stir up a steamed persimmon pudding! I want to see what libation you'll pair it with!

Cocoa and Lavender said...

I will have to go with the traditional method, and am absolutely fascinated by this recipe. First, I have never cooked with persimmons. Second, I have never made a steamed pudding. I will keep my eye out for the persimmons at the market. happy New Year, Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, I hope you can pick up some soon. Not sure when the season is over. I think you are going to fall in love with steamed puddings! Let me know.

Phil in the Kitchen said...

Deliciously different but very traditional at the same time. I love the idea of reviving the steamed pudding - perfect for a winter evening by the fire (OK, central heating radiator). You're right to warn of the difference in size of persimmons. I'm not sure if it's due to the variety or the time of the season or both but there can be a huge difference in the size of the fruit in the shops and markets in this country.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Phil. I love the way you described it! "Deliciously different but very traditional at the same time"--exactly what I was aiming for. Glad you appreciated the size information. Sometimes fruits and vegetables in the shops and markets are entirely different in size from each other and from what people are growing at home.

Lowcarb team member said...

Thanks for sharing the recipe.
Your watercolour is very nice indeed :)

All the best Jan

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Jan. AND for noticing my watercolour!

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