27 February 2020

Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits

Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits - A British West Country Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

A Cornish Split - or Devonshire Split - was the original star of the famous "cream teas": of Cornwall and Devon. Though you'll more often find a cream tea with scones, the split is a classic as well.


Cornish or Devonshire Splits - A British West Country "Cream Tea" Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com


No one appreciates a good scone more than I, but this week I was in the mood for a lovely yeast bun for my cream tea, so here they are! Not a crusty bun, it is neither egg-washed nor well-browned. In fact, a tea towel is spread over them as they cool so as to keep them soft.


Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits - A British West Country Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com
Of course, I had to make a batch of Strawberry Jam and a batch of Clotted Cream 
to fill the splits. But I could spare two berries to "model" for me for this little
watercolor sketch. 


Unlike scones, which are served alongside the accompanying clotted cream and jam (or lemon curd), Splits are served, well, split, and filled with the cream and jam and given a dusting of icing sugar (powdered sugar).

These were so delicious with a pot of Rishi Tea organic loose leaf Earl Grey. Have you ever had Cornish or Devonshire Splits?

Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits - A British West Country Classic / www.delightfulrepast.com

Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits


(Makes 18 buns)

The Buns

3 3/4 dip-and-sweep cups (18.75 ounces/532 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/4 cup (1.75 ounces/50 grams) sugar
2 1/4 teaspoons (1 package/0.25 ounce/7 grams) instant yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons (0.25 ounce/7 grams) salt
6 tablespoons (3 ounces/85 grams) unsalted butter
3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces/177 ml) milk
3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces/177 ml) water

1 large egg (medium in UK), lightly beaten

The Filling

Strawberry Jam 
Clotted Cream

1 In large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, yeast and salt. In small saucepan, heat together butter, milk and water until butter is melted and mixture is very warm, but not more than 130F/54C (a great little thermometer). Line two baking sheets with parchment. I use one half sheet pan and one quarter sheet pan for this recipe. Lightly oil a 2-quart bowl for proofing the dough. I use a 2-quart glass measure, which makes it very easy to tell when the dough has doubled. 

2 With dough whisk or large wooden spoon, stir warm liquid and beaten egg into flour mixture until blended. The dough will be very sticky.

3 Measure out 1/2 dip-and-sweep cup (2.5 ounces/71 grams) of unbleached all-purpose flour to work from while kneading the dough. This will keep you from the common problem of adding too much flour and ruining your dough. Lightly flour the countertop and scrape the dough onto it. Lightly flour the top of the dough and knead for 10 minutes, adding just a bit of flour as needed. You will likely need anywhere from 1/4 cup to slightly less than 1/2 cup.

4 Shape the dough into a smooth ball and place it in a lightly oiled bowl (I use a 2-quart glass measure), cover with lid or plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled, about an hour or so.

5 Deflate the risen dough by pressing your fist into the middle of it. Turn the dough out onto the counter, no need for flour. Divide the dough into 18 equal pieces. I'm pretty particular about my buns and rolls being identical, so I weigh the dough (in this case, my dough was 2 pounds 7 ounces/1106 grams) on my food scale, divide the grams by 18 (in this case, coming out to be about 61 grams per bun), then I weigh each little hunk of dough as I go. Roll the piece of dough between your palms until smooth, then do this to shape it into a nice round bun. Cup your hand over it like a "cage" and move your hand rapidly in an outward motion.



6 Place the buns on the parchment-lined baking sheets and cover with lids or plastic wrap. I don't like using plastic wrap, so I have rimmed baking sheets that come with lids! Let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes or so. During the last 15 minutes, preheat oven to 375F/190C/Gas5.

Cornish Splits - Devonshire Splits - A British West Country Classic (this photo, buns rising on lidded baking sheet) / www.delightfulrepast.com


7 I bake one sheet at a time. Bake for about 15 minutes (you know your oven), until buns are just golden brown and sound hollow when tapped. Transfer to wire cooling rack and cover with a tea towel. Cool completely.


8 When ready to serve, slice the buns diagonally from about a third of the way down in the front to about two-thirds of the way down in the back, but do not slice all the way through. Put in a spoonful of strawberry jam (about 2 level teaspoons works for me) and spread it over both the top and bottom. Then put in a spoonful of clotted cream (about the same amount). Arrange the filled splits on a serving platter or tray, and dust with a little icing sugar.

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon .com and affiliated sites. We are a ThermoWorks affiliate, earning a small commission at no cost to you on purchases made through our links. This helps cover some of the costs of running the blog. Thank you for your support. 

Jean

76 comments:

Thomas "Sully" Sullivan said...

Lately I’ve been overcome with jelly-donut cravings, and Cornish Splits – which I had never heard of – seem like a reasonable facsimile. Soft and sweet, cream texture – yum, yum. When I go to gourmet heaven, I’m quite sure I’ll be rooming with someone who loves tea and hates Cornish Splits! After we are served at tea-time, there will be no crumbs left in Devonshire and no tea ring in the cups.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sully, I love it! I hadn't thought of jelly doughnuts, but yes, these are rather like that but even better! Much as I love them, I would share them with you and drink ALL the tea!

Maya Kuzman said...

Hi Jean!
Thank you for dropping me a visit on my coats refashioning post with such a beautiful comment, though, if I may say, those are not my creations. I was simply sharing inspiration and the credits to all of them are on my board on pinterest (given in the body of the actual post).
It was lovely that you left the link to this mouth watering recipe so that I can return the visit! The pictures do tickle my palate! I am sure it tastes like heaven!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Maya, thank you. So kind! And your creations or not, you made me aware of this whole new-to-me take on refashioning garments--beautiful!

Lorrie said...

These look delicious. I've never had a Cornish/Devonshire Split, but I can certainly see their appeal!

Tamago said...

I've never had Cornish/Devonshire splits though I've had something similar, which is a split bun with cream and jam in between!
They look super yummy. I know I love it if I could taste them :-)

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Lorrie, thank you. I do hope you'll try one soon. They are ever so delicious and satisfying.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Tamago. You can't go wrong with anything filled with cream and jam, right?!

April J Harris said...

I have eaten Cornish splits in Cornwall, and I think yours look nicer than the ones I had there, Jean! The buns look gorgeous and you've added exactly the right amount of cream and jam. Thank you so much for sharing this lovely recipe with the Hearth and Soul Link Party. Have a wonderful Leap Day tomorrow!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

April, thank you so much! I do so like it when food can be pretty, too. Hope you enjoy your "extra" day this month!

Vee said...

Oh my heavens, Jean, those look amazing. 🍓

Angie's Recipes said...

I have never had a Cornish split...love those homemade buns, so soft and tender.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Vee, thank you! I do love them!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Angie. Yes, they are very soft and tender, beautiful texture to go with the clotted cream and jam.

Unknown said...

These look so great! I was just in London for a very short amount of time and i simply adore the food over there, especially all those great things to have with tea, pastries, scones and of course, clotted cream. Visiting from the Country Cottage blog hop. Have a great week!

Linda Holsopple said...

I've gone over your recipe several times and I can't see where the egg is used.

TONY said...

Yes, I have eaten Cornish Splits on many occasions, Jean. Clotted cream and strawberry jam mmmm!!! It’s good to be able to eat them sitting in a pub or tea shop at the side of a Cornish harbour, Polperro or Mevagissy for instance. Have you ever been to Cornwall Jean? You and Mr Delightful would love it.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Unknown. I'm so glad you found me. If you enjoy British food and tea and all that, you're going to find lots of things here you'll want to make!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Linda, look at step two and you'll see where the egg comes in. It gets stirred into the flour along with the milk mixture. Thank you for asking.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Tony. Yes, I'm sure we'd love it, but no, we haven't managed to visit Cornwall yet!

tea lady said...

I like to have Tea parties, and I am sure the gals would love these, I would serve them with jam and lemon curd, could eat one right now

Pauline Wiles said...

My word, Jean, these look amazing. I'm not sure (??) I've ever had a Split but I would dearly love to try these!

Suchot said...

I have never had these before but they look so delicious! I love scones with my tea and I bet I would love these too! I also like that they don't have tons of sugar in the recipe. xx

ellen b. said...

Mouth watering!

Victoria Zigler said...

I had them several times before becoming vegan, though generally not home made. Didn't know that was the proper name for them though.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Tea lady, thank you. I hope these are a huge hit a your tea parties!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Pauline. You definitely need to try these. I know you'll like them.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Suchot, thanks. I put as little sugar as possible in my recipes.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Ellen!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Victoria, you could make these vegan, of course. Just use a vegan fat instead of butter, leave out the egg, and make a vegan "cream" filling.

Victoria Zigler said...

Definitely have to try that!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Super! Let me know how it turns out for you, Victoria.

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

What sweet little buns! I've never heard of them before but they look and sound delicious. I usually have my scone the Cornish way. You always manage to share something wonderful, Jean. Sometimes, like this time, it's a surprise. I love that!

Sandi@ Rose Chintz Cottage said...

PS~ I forgot to mention that I love your watercolour of the berries! My aunt did watercolours for years and made some good money doing it.
I miss painting myself and I really wish my son would take it up again. Now I have a young grandson who sketches just like I did. So proud to see the gift run through the family! Thank you for sharing yours with us.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Sandi, thank you so much! I'm so glad I finally took up painting, had always wanted to do, but never did. I'm having such fun with it. It's wonderful that your grandson is getting an early start. I have my scones the Devon way, cream first, because I use a lot of cream and just a little jam, so the pretty jam wouldn't even show if I did it the Cornish way!

Ellen Hawley said...

Just a quick testimonial: Cornish splits are wonderful. (Sorry, Devon. I'm biased.) In my experience, though, they don't keep well, so eat lots the first day.

Louca por porcelana said...

Delicious recipe!Love your pretty strawberries too!Hugs!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Ellen. (Notice, I put Cornish first!) They must be filled just before serving, in my opinion.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Maristella! Hugs.

Cocoa and Lavender said...

While my ancestors are from Cornwall, I have never had nor heard of a Cornish Split... but I want one so badly now! They are beautiful duns, Jean!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

David, thank you. And, yes, if your ancestors are from Cornwall, well ...

Jeanie said...

I think I need to save this one. I've never had one of these but oh, they look so scrumptious!

Jeanie said...

PS -- Your strawberries are divine. If you jam is half as good, it's terrific!

Phil in the Kitchen said...

These look exactly the way I think they should be and completely delicious. I first heard of Devonshire (or Devon) Splits in the 1980s and, being annoyingly curious, I spent some time wandering about Devon looking for them. At the time I could only find 2 tea shops in the county selling splits among many hundreds selling scones. I think they've become much more common since and quite rightly so. Incidentally, I was also trying to find out at the same time if Chudleighs (or Chudleigh Buns) were the same thing as Splits. Most people say they are but one Devon baker told me they were subtly different. I never did quite get to the bottom of that conundrum.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Jeanie, thank you. AND for noticing my strawberries! I've been wanting to paint more of them, but haven't had time. :-( Must remedy that. Hope you'll try these!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Phil! I do love these. And near as I can tell, a Chudleigh bun is no different. One or two sources mentioned that a Chudleigh bun was a bit smaller than a Cornish split, but I'm sure everyone makes them all different sizes regardless of what they call them. I think mine are the perfect size. I might make a smaller version for an afternoon tea party, but I will still call them Cornish or Devonshire Splits.

handmade by amalia said...

You know the way to my heart, Jean.
Amalia
xo

Menaka Bharathi said...

lOOKS REALLY YUMM! Thanks for joining us in bloggers pit stop - Pit Stop Crew

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Amalia! I have 4 left in the freezer.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Menaka. And YOU will be glad to know they were made with all organic ingredients!

Miz Helen said...

What a beautiful tea time treat! Thanks so much for sharing with us at Full Plate Thursday,473 and hope you are having a great week!
Miz Helen

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks so much, Miz Helen. I froze most of these buns and then thawed, filled and enjoyed one or two every day, so yes, a great week! :D

kitty@ Kitty's Kozy Kitchen said...

Ni Jean, I’ve never had a split, nor heard of them. Thank you so much for sharing them with us. I’d love to have one with a cup of tea! Happy baking!!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kitty, thank you. I know you would love these. Wish you could come over for tea today--I have just two buns left in the freezer.

Shelbee on the Edge said...

Oh my word, my mouth is watering! I have never had anything like this, but I want to. Like right now! This looks so scrumptious! Thanks for sharing and linking up with me!

Shelbee
www.shelbeeontheedge.com

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

Oh but those do look scrumptious!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Oh, Shelbee, that's what I like to hear! :-) I always recommend making yeast breads by hand because it is soooo therapeutic.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Karen, thank you so much!

Margie said...

I've never had Cornish or Devonshire splits before. I didn't know what was missing in my my life until I saw this post!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Margie. This is definitely one you need to make for one of your tea socials!

Kitchen Riffs said...

I'm pretty sure I've had a Cornish Split or two in my life (served as part of a cream tea, of course), but I've never made them. Nor knew how they were made. Such a nice recipe! Kinda sorta like cream puffs, but better. Thanks!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, John. They ARE a delightful treat. Hope you get to have another cream tea soon!

Laurie said...

I truly don’t need my eyes to know this is delicous! A winner all the way!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Laurie! And you don't need them to paint pictures with words as you do so beautifully. I hope everyone will read your post about the northern lights. Very moving, evocative.

Lazy Gastronome said...

These look amazing!! Making me hungry.

Kim Carberry said...

Ohh! Yum! This looks so delicious!
Scones are nice but these are a real treat! x

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Helen. That's the idea! :D

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Kim, thank you! Yes, I agree. I do love a good scone, but ... :-)

Jenni said...

These look lovely, you can’t beat a cream tea #sundaysnapshot

Susan Mann said...

Now that looks amazing. So tasty xx #sundaysnapshot

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks Jenni. I made another batch of clotted cream the other day and will make the splits again very soon!

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you, Susan. I do loads of British baking!

Julie's Creative Lifestyle said...

Your dessert looks so good and I bet tastes great with tea. Thanks for sharing this recipe with us.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thanks, Julie. Yes, tea and a split is a perfect pairing.

Lazy Gastronome said...

Oh this looks so decadent and delicious! Thanks for sharing at the What's for Dinner party. Have a great week.

Jean | DelightfulRepast.com said...

Thank you so much, Helen. Wish I had one right this minute!

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